Alleyn's College

Alleyn's College of God's Giftcollegethe College of God's Gift
Alleyn's College of God's Gift is a historic charity in England, founded in 1619 by the Elizabethan actor and businessman Edward Alleyn who endowed it with the ancient Manor of Dulwich in south London.wikipedia
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Dulwich Picture Gallery

Dulwich Art GalleryDulwich GalleryBritain's first public art gallery
Dulwich Picture Gallery became independent and ceased to be a beneficiary in 1995.
Until this time the gallery was part of Alleyn's College of God's Gift, a charitable foundation established by the actor, entrepreneur and philanthropist Edward Alleyn in the early-17th century.

Dulwich Estate

The Dulwich EstateThe Dulwich CharitiesThe Old College and Almshouses
The Dulwich Estate is the successor charity which owns the remaining freehold land of the manor of Dulwich.
The Dulwich Estate is a registered charity in England, one of the successors to the historic charity Alleyn's College of God's Gift that was founded in 1619.

Central Foundation Boys' School

Central Foundation SchoolCentral FoundationCentral Foundation Boys School
The Foundation is also required to support from its endowment, as originally required by Alleyn, the Central Foundation Schools of London, which benefits Central Foundation Boys' School and Central Foundation Girls' School, and St Olave's & St Saviour's Schools Foundation, which benefits St Olave's Grammar School and St Saviour's and St Olave's Church of England School which are beneficiaries but wholly independent and indeed older foundations than that at Dulwich.
Both schools are beneficiaries of the charity Central Foundation Schools of London, which in turn is a beneficiary of The Dulwich Estate, successor to the historic Alleyn's College charity.

Dulwich

Dulwich, LondonNorth DulwichDulwich Grove
Alleyn's College of God's Gift is a historic charity in England, founded in 1619 by the Elizabethan actor and businessman Edward Alleyn who endowed it with the ancient Manor of Dulwich in south London. On 21 June 1619 the letters patent were signed by James I authorising Edward Alleyn to establish a college in Dulwich to be called the College of God's Gift, in Dulwich in Surrey.
He vested his wealth in a charitable foundation, Alleyn's College of God's Gift, established in 1619.

Alleyn's School

AlleynAlleyn's Boys' SchoolAlleyn's Junior School
The Upper School became Dulwich College (officially for the first time) and the Lower became Alleyn's School.
It is a registered charity and was originally part of the Alleyn's College of God's Gift charitable foundation, which also included James Allen's Girls' School (JAGS), Dulwich College and their affiliate schools (JAPS and Alleyn's Junior School).

Dulwich College

DulwichOld AlleynianDulwich College Boat Club
The Upper School became Dulwich College (officially for the first time) and the Lower became Alleyn's School.
Founder's Day at Dulwich College is celebrated at the end of the Summer Term to commemorate the signing of the letters patent by James I on 21 June 1619 authorising Edward Alleyn to establish a college in Dulwich to be called 'the College of God's Gift, in Dulwich in Surrey'.

St Saviour's and St Olave's Church of England School

St Saviour's and St Olave's Grammar School for GirlsSt Saviour's and St Olave's School
The Foundation is also required to support from its endowment, as originally required by Alleyn, the Central Foundation Schools of London, which benefits Central Foundation Boys' School and Central Foundation Girls' School, and St Olave's & St Saviour's Schools Foundation, which benefits St Olave's Grammar School and St Saviour's and St Olave's Church of England School which are beneficiaries but wholly independent and indeed older foundations than that at Dulwich.
Both schools are beneficiaries of the charitable St Olave's and St Saviour's Schools Foundation, which in turn is a beneficiary of The Dulwich Estate, successor to the historic Alleyn's College charity.

Central Foundation Girls' School

The Foundation is also required to support from its endowment, as originally required by Alleyn, the Central Foundation Schools of London, which benefits Central Foundation Boys' School and Central Foundation Girls' School, and St Olave's & St Saviour's Schools Foundation, which benefits St Olave's Grammar School and St Saviour's and St Olave's Church of England School which are beneficiaries but wholly independent and indeed older foundations than that at Dulwich.
Both schools are beneficiaries of the charity Central Foundation Schools of London, which in turn is a beneficiary of The Dulwich Estate, successor to the historic Alleyn's College charity.

James Allen's Girls' School

Some notable Masters did preside over the College in this time including James Allen (the first Master to drop the 'y' from his surname) who in 1741 made over to the college six houses in Kensington, the rents of which were to be used in the establishment of two little schools in Dulwich, one for boys from the village, the other for girls to read and sew, from which James Allen's Girls' School arose.

Edward Alleyn

AlleynNed Alleynhere
Alleyn's College of God's Gift is a historic charity in England, founded in 1619 by the Elizabethan actor and businessman Edward Alleyn who endowed it with the ancient Manor of Dulwich in south London. On 21 June 1619 the letters patent were signed by James I authorising Edward Alleyn to establish a college in Dulwich to be called the College of God's Gift, in Dulwich in Surrey.

St Olave's Grammar School

St Olave's and St Saviour's Grammar SchoolSt. Olave's Grammar SchoolSaint Olave's Grammar School
The Foundation is also required to support from its endowment, as originally required by Alleyn, the Central Foundation Schools of London, which benefits Central Foundation Boys' School and Central Foundation Girls' School, and St Olave's & St Saviour's Schools Foundation, which benefits St Olave's Grammar School and St Saviour's and St Olave's Church of England School which are beneficiaries but wholly independent and indeed older foundations than that at Dulwich.

Letters patent

commissionpatentroyal patent
On 21 June 1619 the letters patent were signed by James I authorising Edward Alleyn to establish a college in Dulwich to be called the College of God's Gift, in Dulwich in Surrey.

James VI and I

James IJames VIJames I of England
On 21 June 1619 the letters patent were signed by James I authorising Edward Alleyn to establish a college in Dulwich to be called the College of God's Gift, in Dulwich in Surrey.

Colloquialism

colloquialcolloquiallycolloq.
The term Dulwich College was used colloquially from that date, such as in 1675 when John Evelyn described his visit to "Dulwich College" in his Diary.

John Evelyn

EvelynMary EvelynSir John Evelyn
The term Dulwich College was used colloquially from that date, such as in 1675 when John Evelyn described his visit to "Dulwich College" in his Diary.

John Evelyn's Diary

DiaryEvelyn's DiaryDiary of John Evelyn
The term Dulwich College was used colloquially from that date, such as in 1675 when John Evelyn described his visit to "Dulwich College" in his Diary.

George Augustus Sala

George Augustus Henry SalaGeorge SalaAugustus Sala
All of these ventures were legitimate at the time and rumours that Alleyn turned his attention towards charitable pursuits out of fear for his moral well-being have been traced to the journalist George Sala and discredited.

Manorialism

manormanorsmanorial
Since 1605, Alleyn had owned the manorial estate of Dulwich, and it may have been around this time that he first had the idea of establishing a college or hospital for poor people and the education of poor boys.

George Abbot (bishop)

George AbbotArchbishop AbbotArchbishop of Canterbury
On 1 September 1616 the chapel was consecrated by the Archbishop of Canterbury who became the official Visitor.

Francis Bacon

Sir Francis BaconBaconLord Bacon
However, Edward Alleyn faced objections from Francis Bacon, the Lord Chancellor, in getting the patent of incorporation that was necessary to secure the Foundation's status as a college.

Lord Chancellor

Lord High Chancellor of Great BritainLord Chancellor of EnglandChancellor
However, Edward Alleyn faced objections from Francis Bacon, the Lord Chancellor, in getting the patent of incorporation that was necessary to secure the Foundation's status as a college.

Winchester College

WinchesterWinchester SchoolOld Wykehamists
Alleyn drew upon the experience of other similar establishments in order to formulate the statutes and ordinances of the College (including borrowing the statutes of the already ancient Winchester College and visiting the more contemporary establishments of Sutton's Hospital (now Charterhouse School) and Croydon's Hospital (now Whitgift School)).

Charterhouse School

CharterhouseCarthusianCharter House
Alleyn drew upon the experience of other similar establishments in order to formulate the statutes and ordinances of the College (including borrowing the statutes of the already ancient Winchester College and visiting the more contemporary establishments of Sutton's Hospital (now Charterhouse School) and Croydon's Hospital (now Whitgift School)).

Whitgift School

Whitgift Grammar SchoolWhitgiftWhitgift School, Croydon
Alleyn drew upon the experience of other similar establishments in order to formulate the statutes and ordinances of the College (including borrowing the statutes of the already ancient Winchester College and visiting the more contemporary establishments of Sutton's Hospital (now Charterhouse School) and Croydon's Hospital (now Whitgift School)).

James Allen (educator)

James AllenJames Allen (formerly Alleyn)James Alleyn
Some notable Masters did preside over the College in this time including James Allen (the first Master to drop the 'y' from his surname) who in 1741 made over to the college six houses in Kensington, the rents of which were to be used in the establishment of two little schools in Dulwich, one for boys from the village, the other for girls to read and sew, from which James Allen's Girls' School arose.