A report on Geneva and Allobroges

A view of Geneva by Frances Elizabeth Wynne, 4 August 1858
Territory of the Allobroges during the Roman period (dark green).
L'Escalade is what Genevans call the failed surprise attack of 12 December 1602 by troops sent by Charles Emmanuel I, Duke of Savoy, to take Geneva. This imaginative image was drawn by Matthias Quad, or the workshop of Frans Hogenberg, around 1603. Invaders are pictured crossing the moat in the center left while reinforcements are entering Plainpalais at the bottom. A column of defenders is in the center, headed toward the Savoyards. Lake Léman is at center top.
Roman temple in Vienna.
Aerial view (1966)
Hannibal crossing the Alps into Italy.
Satellite view of Geneva; Cointrin Airport is centre left.
Allobrogian denarius from the 1st century BC.
The Geneva area seen from the Salève in France. The Jura mountains are on the horizon.
Confluence of the Rhône and the Arve
Average temperature and precipitation 1961–1990
Coat of arms of Geneva as part of the pavement in front of the Reformation Wall, 2013
The Flowered Clock at the Quai du Général-Guisan (English Garden), during the 2012 Geneva Festival
Rue Pierre-Fatio in Geneva
Apartment buildings in the Quartier des Grottes
Geneva, with Lake Geneva in the background
Reformation Wall in Geneva; from left to right: William Farel, John Calvin, Theodore Beza, and John Knox
Fireworks at the Fêtes de Genève, 2012
Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
The University of Geneva.
Geneva railway station
TCMC (Tramway Cornavin – Meyrin – CERN)
Geneva Sécheron railway station
TOSA Bus at PALEXPO Flash bus stops
The World Intellectual Property Organization.
The assembly hall of the Palace of Nations.
Gustave Ador
Christiane Brunner
John Calvin, c. 1550
Isaac Casaubon
Michel Decastel, 2012
Jean Henri Dunant, 1901
Kat Graham, 2017
Francois Huber
Paul Lachenal, 1939
Lenin in Switzerland, 1916
Amelie Mauresmo, 2014
Liliane Maury Pasquier, 2007
Pierre Prévost
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Ferdinand de Saussure
Michael Schade, 2012
Michel Simon, 1964
Johann Vogel, 2006
Voltaire
St. Pierre Cathedral
Collège Calvin
International Committee of the Red Cross (CICR)
Conservatory and Botanical Garden of the City of Geneva
Notre-Dame Church
Russian Orthodox Church
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
Hôtel de Ville and the Tour Baudet
Institut et Musée Voltaire
Mallet House and Museum international de la Réforme
Tavel House
Brunswick Monument
Musée d'Art et d'Histoire
The Villa La Grange

By the mid-1st century BC, they also possessed a piece of land north of the Rhône river, between modern Lyon and Geneva, whose later status remains uncertain.

- Allobroges

Geneva was an Allobrogian border town, fortified against the Helvetii tribe, when the Romans took it in 121 BC. It became Christian under the Late Roman Empire, and acquired its first bishop in the 5th century, having been connected to the Bishopric of Vienne in the 4th.

- Geneva
A view of Geneva by Frances Elizabeth Wynne, 4 August 1858

3 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Map of the Roman province Maxima Sequanorum (c. 300 AD), which comprised the territories of a part of the Helvetii, Sequani and several smaller tribes. The relative locations of the Helvetian pagi Tigurini and Verbigeni, though indicated on the map, remain unknown.

Helvetii

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The Helvetii (Helvētiī, Gaulish: *Heluētī), anglicized as Helvetians, were a Celtic tribe or tribal confederation occupying most of the Swiss plateau at the time of their contact with the Roman Republic in the 1st century BC. According to Julius Caesar, the Helvetians were divided into four subgroups or pagi. Of these, Caesar names only the Verbigeni and the Tigurini, while Posidonius mentions the Tigurini and the Tougeni (Τωυγενοί).

The Helvetii (Helvētiī, Gaulish: *Heluētī), anglicized as Helvetians, were a Celtic tribe or tribal confederation occupying most of the Swiss plateau at the time of their contact with the Roman Republic in the 1st century BC. According to Julius Caesar, the Helvetians were divided into four subgroups or pagi. Of these, Caesar names only the Verbigeni and the Tigurini, while Posidonius mentions the Tigurini and the Tougeni (Τωυγενοί).

Map of the Roman province Maxima Sequanorum (c. 300 AD), which comprised the territories of a part of the Helvetii, Sequani and several smaller tribes. The relative locations of the Helvetian pagi Tigurini and Verbigeni, though indicated on the map, remain unknown.
«Die Helvetier zwingen die Römer unter dem Joch hindurch» ("The Helvetians force the Romans to pass under the yoke"). Romantic painting by Charles Gleyre (19th century) celebrating the Helvetian victory over the Romans at Agen (107 BC) under Divico's command.
Julius Caesar and Divico parley after the battle at the Saône. Historic painting of the 19th century by Karl Jauslin.
Roman provinces in AD 14
Celtic (orange) and Raetic (green) settlements in Switzerland

When they reached the boundaries of the Allobroges, the northernmost tribe of the Provincia, they found that Caesar had already dismantled the bridge of Geneva to stop their advance.

Rhône

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Major river in France and Switzerland, rising in the Alps and flowing west and south through Lake Geneva and southeastern France before discharging into the Mediterranean Sea.

Major river in France and Switzerland, rising in the Alps and flowing west and south through Lake Geneva and southeastern France before discharging into the Mediterranean Sea.

The source of the Rhône, at the foot of the Rhône Glacier, above Oberwald.
The Rhône flowing through the valleys of the Swiss Alps and arriving into Lake Geneva, in Switzerland.
Mouth of the Rhone
Pont du Mont-Blanc in Geneva, marking the outflow from Lake Geneva (right)
The Rhône in Lyon under the old Boucle's Bridge
The Rhône at Avignon
Almost all tributaries more than 36 km long. The portion of the Rhône above Brig-Glis is labelled by its native Walliser German name, Rotten

Lake Geneva ends in the city of Geneva, where the lake level is controlled by the.

Celtic tribes living near the Rhône included the Seduni, Sequani, Segobriges, Allobroges, Segusiavi, Helvetii, Vocontii and Volcae Arecomici.

Savoy

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Cultural-historical region in the Western Alps.

Cultural-historical region in the Western Alps.

Alpine landscape of Les Saisies, as seen from Mont Bisanne.
Duchy of Savoy (red) and other Italian states in 1494.
Map of Savoy in the 16th century. White lines are modern borders
Map of Savoy in the 18th century and other Italian states in 1796.
People of Chambéry with French flags celebrating the annexation in 1860.
Map of Savoy in the 19th century and other Italian states in 1843.
French annexation in 1860 (black) after the signing of the Treaty of Turin and a regional referendum in favor of the attachment to France (French)
The Château de Chambéry, seat of government, was given a grand new façade following annexation

The region was occupied by the Allobroges, a Gaulish people that the Roman Republic subdued in 121 BC.

It acquired the County of Nice in 1388, and in 1401 added the County of Geneva, the area of Geneva except for the city proper, which was ruled by its prince-bishop, nominally under the duke's rule: the bishops of Geneva, by unspoken agreement, came from the House of Savoy until 1533.