Diagram of a typical drupe (peach), showing both fruit and seed
Almond in shell, shell cracked open, unshelled and blanched seed
The development sequence of a typical drupe, a smooth-skinned (nectarine) type of peach (Prunus persica) over a 7 1⁄2-month period, from bud formation in early winter to fruit ripening in midsummer
Occasionally two seeds occur
Assorted drupes
Persian miniature depiction of the almond harvest at Qand-i Badam, Fergana Valley (16th century)
The peach is a typical drupe (stone fruit)
Almond tree with blossoming flowers, Valley of Elah, Israel
'Elena', a freestone prune plum
Flowering (sweet) almond tree
The pit of a nectarine
Blossoming of bitter almond tree
Unripe drupes of black pepper
Almond cream cake covered in slivered almonds
'Black Butte' blackberry, a bramble fruit of aggregated drupelets
Colomba di Pasqua, traditional Italian Easter bread
A ripe areca nut
Danish cream cake covered with marzipan
Ginkgo "fruits", often noted as drupe-like
Almond oil
Green almonds
Almond shell
Blanched almonds
A grove of almond trees
Almond blossoms
Young almond fruit
Mature almond fruit
An almond shaker before and during a harvest of a tree

The fruit of the almond is a drupe, consisting of an outer hull and a hard shell with the seed, which is not a true nut.

- Almond

Flowering plants that produce drupes include coffee, jujube, mango, olive, most palms (including açaí, date, sabal, coconut and oil palms), pistachio, white sapote, cashew, and all members of the genus Prunus, including the almond, apricot, cherry, damson, peach, nectarine, and plum.

- Drupe

5 related topics

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Seeds of various plants. Row 1: poppy, red pepper, strawberry, apple tree, blackberry, rice, carum, Row 2: mustard, eggplant, physalis, grapes, raspberries, red rice, patchouli, Row 3: figs, lycium barbarum, beets, blueberries, golden kiwifruit, rosehip, basil, Row 4: pink pepper, tomato, radish, carrot, matthiola, dill, coriander, Row 5: black pepper, white cabbage, napa cabbage, seabuckthorn, parsley, dandelion, capsella bursa-pastoris, Row 6: cauliflower, radish, kiwifruit, grenadilla, passion fruit, melissa, tagetes erecta.

Seed

Embryonic plant enclosed in a protective outer covering, along with a food reserve.

Embryonic plant enclosed in a protective outer covering, along with a food reserve.

Seeds of various plants. Row 1: poppy, red pepper, strawberry, apple tree, blackberry, rice, carum, Row 2: mustard, eggplant, physalis, grapes, raspberries, red rice, patchouli, Row 3: figs, lycium barbarum, beets, blueberries, golden kiwifruit, rosehip, basil, Row 4: pink pepper, tomato, radish, carrot, matthiola, dill, coriander, Row 5: black pepper, white cabbage, napa cabbage, seabuckthorn, parsley, dandelion, capsella bursa-pastoris, Row 6: cauliflower, radish, kiwifruit, grenadilla, passion fruit, melissa, tagetes erecta.
Plant ovules: Gymnosperm ovule on left, angiosperm ovule (inside ovary) on right
The inside of a Ginkgo seed, showing a well-developed embryo, nutritive tissue (megagametophyte), and a bit of the surrounding seed coat
The parts of an avocado seed (a dicot), showing the seed coat and embryo
Diagram of the internal structure of a dicot seed and embryo: (a) seed coat, (b) endosperm, (c) cotyledon, (d) hypocotyl
Diagram of a generalized dicot seed (1) versus a generalized monocot seed (2). A. Scutellum B. Cotyledon C. Hilum D. Plumule E. Radicle F. Endosperm
Comparison of monocotyledons and dicotyledons
Seed coat of pomegranate
A collection of various vegetable and herb seeds
Dandelion seeds are contained within achenes, which can be carried long distances by the wind.
The seed pod of milkweed (Asclepias syriaca)
Germinating sunflower seedlings
Microbial transmission from seed to seedling
Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean or green bean) seeds are diverse in size, shape, and color.
The massive fruit of the coco de mer

Different groups of plants have other modifications, the so-called stone fruits (such as the peach) have a hardened fruit layer (the endocarp) fused to and surrounding the actual seed.

In addition, seeds containing amygdalin – apple, apricot, bitter almond, peach, plum, cherry, quince, and others – when consumed in sufficient amounts, may cause cyanide poisoning.

Red cherries with stems

Cherry

"Cherry tree" and "cherry wood" redirect here.

"Cherry tree" and "cherry wood" redirect here.

Red cherries with stems
Prunus avium, sweet cherry (a true cherry species)
Prunus cerasus, sour cherry (a true cherry species)
Prunus tomentosa, Nanking cherry (a bush cherry species)
Prunus ilicifolia, hollyleaf cherry (a cherry laurel species)
Prunus serotina, black cherry (a bird cherry species)
The Cherry Seller, by Sara Troost (18th Century Netherlands)
Salvatore Postiglione Cherry time
Cherries with Monilinia laxa
Rainier cherries from the state of Washington, USA
Ripe sweet cherries in Tehran
Fresh Michigan cherries in a basket
Cherrywood desk of drawers
Germersdorfer variety cherry tree in blossom

A cherry is the fruit of many plants of the genus Prunus, and is a fleshy drupe (stone fruit).

The name 'cherry' also refers to the cherry tree and its wood, and is sometimes applied to almonds and visually similar flowering trees in the genus Prunus, as in "ornamental cherry" or "cherry blossom".

Prunus

Japanese cherry (Prunus serrulata) blossoms
Tibetan cherry (Prunus serrula) bark
Black cherry (Prunus serotina) in bloom
The development sequence of a nectarine (P. persica) over a 7.5-month period, from bud formation in early winter to fruit ripening in midsummer
Cherries are prone to gummosis.

Prunus is a genus of trees and shrubs, which includes (among many others) the fruits plums, cherries, peaches, nectarines, apricots, and almonds.

Prunus fruit are drupes, or stone fruits.

Chestnuts are both botanical and culinary nuts.

Nut (fruit)

Fruit consisting of a hard or tough nutshell protecting a kernel which is usually edible.

Fruit consisting of a hard or tough nutshell protecting a kernel which is usually edible.

Chestnuts are both botanical and culinary nuts.
Some common "culinary nuts": hazelnuts, which are also botanical nuts; Brazil nuts, which are not botanical nuts, but rather the seeds of a capsule; and walnuts, pecans, and almonds (which are not botanical nuts, but rather the seeds of drupes)
Nuts being sold in a market
Raw mixed nuts, sold as a snack food.

The general and original usage of the term is less restrictive, and many nuts (in the culinary sense), such as almonds, pecans, pistachios, walnuts, and Brazil nuts, are not nuts in a botanical sense.

Also widely known as nuts are dry drupes, which include pecans (Carya illinoensis), almonds (Prunus amygdalus), macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia), candlenut (Aleurites moluccanus), water caltrop (Trapa bicornis) and walnuts (Juglans regia).

Peach

Deciduous tree first domesticated and cultivated in Zhejiang province of Eastern China.

Deciduous tree first domesticated and cultivated in Zhejiang province of Eastern China.

Peach flowers
Dried date, peach, apricot, and stones from Lahun, Fayum, Egypt, Late Middle Kingdom, Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, London
A peach flower with a bee pollinating it
White peach of the clingstone variety
White nectarines, whole and cut open
The developmental sequence of a nectarine over a 7 1⁄2-month period, from bud formation in early winter to fruit ripening in midsummer
Pierre-Auguste Renoir, A Still Life Painting of Peaches, 1881–82
A peach tree in blossom
Peach blossoms
Incipient fruit development
Peach (cultivar 'Berry') – watercolour, 1895
Claude Monet, A Jar of Peaches, {{circa|1866}}
Girl with Peaches
Still Life Basket of Peaches
Portrait of Isabella and John Stewart
Prunus persica - MHNT
Momotarō emerges from a peach.

It belongs to the genus Prunus, which includes the cherry, apricot, almond, and plum, in the rose family.

Peaches, along with cherries, plums, and apricots, are stone fruits (drupes).