Alt.religion.scientology

alt.religion.scientology controversycritics of ScientologyInternet-based critic
The newsgroup alt.religion.scientology (often abbreviated a.r.s or ARS) is a Usenet newsgroup started in 1991 to discuss the controversial beliefs of Scientology, as well as the activities of the Church of Scientology, which claims exclusive intellectual property rights thereto and is viewed by many as a dangerous cult.wikipedia
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Scientology and the Internet

Scientology versus the InternetDennis ErlichZenon Panoussis
The newsgroup has become the focal point of an aggressive battle known as Scientology versus the Internet, which has taken place both online and in the courts.
Scott Goehring set up the newsgroup alt.religion.scientology in 1991, partly as a joke, partly for the purpose of informing the public about Scientology.

Scientology

ScientologistScientologistsInternational Association of Scientologists
The newsgroup alt.religion.scientology (often abbreviated a.r.s or ARS) is a Usenet newsgroup started in 1991 to discuss the controversial beliefs of Scientology, as well as the activities of the Church of Scientology, which claims exclusive intellectual property rights thereto and is viewed by many as a dangerous cult.
In January 1995, church lawyer Helena Kobrin attempted to shut down the newsgroup alt.religion.scientology by sending a control message instructing Usenet servers to delete the group.

Cult of the Dead Cow

cDcDrunkfuxCult of the Dead Cow, Goolag campaign
It also led to a declaration of war by hacker group Cult of the Dead Cow.
The cDc declared war on the Church of Scientology in 1995 during the alt.religion.scientology controversy, stating We believe that El Ron Hubbard [sic] is actually none other than Heinrich Himmler of the SS, who fled to Argentina and is now responsible for the stealing of babies from hospitals and raising them as 'super-soldiers' for the purpose of overthrowing the U.S. Fed. Govt.

Church of Scientology

ScientologistScientologyScientologists
The newsgroup alt.religion.scientology (often abbreviated a.r.s or ARS) is a Usenet newsgroup started in 1991 to discuss the controversial beliefs of Scientology, as well as the activities of the Church of Scientology, which claims exclusive intellectual property rights thereto and is viewed by many as a dangerous cult.

Moxon & Kobrin

Helena KobrinBowles & MoxonBowles and Moxon
The online "war" first came to the attention of Internet users in general when Scientology lawyer Helena Kobrin attempted to remove the entire newsgroup from Usenet.
She caused controversy on usenet in the mid-1990s when she tried to get the newsgroup alt.religion.scientology shut down, and later e-mailed legal warnings to participants who had quoted as few as six lines of Scientology texts.

Control message

Cancel messagenewgroup messagermgroup message
The original Usenet newgroup message used to create the newsgroup was formatted in a manner to disguise the actual identity of the poster.
In 1995 the Church of Scientology attempted to silence criticism by sending mass "rmgroup" messages to Usenet servers targeting alt.religion.scientology, an example of the church's continuing efforts to suppress material critical of Scientology on the Internet.

Newsgroup spam

spamspammingspammed
In parallel with this, floods of articles containing excerpts of publicly available Church of Scientology material were spammed to the newsgroup.
A prominent example occurred in alt.religion.scientology.

Scieno Sitter

As evidence, they point to the software package sometimes dubbed "Scieno Sitter" by critics.
Other keywords on notable topics which are blocked by the program include the names of several notable critics of Scientology, including Robert Vaughn Young and Keith Henson, as well as several hundred other frequent participants in the alt.religion.scientology newsgroup, together with terms like Suppressive Person, and Lisa McPherson.

Sporgery

sporgers
The word sporgery was coined in the newsgroup alt.religion.scientology, an Internet newsgroup where people discuss the controversial belief system of Scientology.

Alt.* hierarchy

altalt.*'' hierarchyalt.usage.english
The newsgroup alt.religion.scientology (often abbreviated a.r.s or ARS) is a Usenet newsgroup started in 1991 to discuss the controversial beliefs of Scientology, as well as the activities of the Church of Scientology, which claims exclusive intellectual property rights thereto and is viewed by many as a dangerous cult.

Usenet

netnewsnewsnewsgroup
The newsgroup alt.religion.scientology (often abbreviated a.r.s or ARS) is a Usenet newsgroup started in 1991 to discuss the controversial beliefs of Scientology, as well as the activities of the Church of Scientology, which claims exclusive intellectual property rights thereto and is viewed by many as a dangerous cult.

Intellectual property

intellectual property rightsIPintellectual property law
The newsgroup alt.religion.scientology (often abbreviated a.r.s or ARS) is a Usenet newsgroup started in 1991 to discuss the controversial beliefs of Scientology, as well as the activities of the Church of Scientology, which claims exclusive intellectual property rights thereto and is viewed by many as a dangerous cult.

Cult

cultsreligious cultdestructive cult
The newsgroup alt.religion.scientology (often abbreviated a.r.s or ARS) is a Usenet newsgroup started in 1991 to discuss the controversial beliefs of Scientology, as well as the activities of the Church of Scientology, which claims exclusive intellectual property rights thereto and is viewed by many as a dangerous cult.

Newsday

New York NewsdayLong Island NewsdayNewsday.com
Newsday inaccurately reported that Goehring started the newsgroup to demonstrate the behaviour of Scientologists to his girlfriend.

David Miscavige

MiscavigeMiscavige
A bogus email address, "miscaviage@flag.sea.org" (a misspelling of "David Miscavige", the current head of Scientology's Religious Technology Center), was inserted into the newsgroup creation message.

Security hacker

hackerhackinghackers
It also led to a declaration of war by hacker group Cult of the Dead Cow.

Streisand effect

backfiredreuploaded by his fansThe Streisand Effect
Rather than being removed from Usenet, the newsgroup exploded in popularity.

Cancelbot

Starting in 1995, large numbers of rogue cancels were posted to the newsgroup by a cancelbot dubbed "Cancelbunny", mainly against critical articles containing portions of the "Advanced Technology" documents.

Google Groups

Google GroupDeja NewsDeja.com
The total number of readers is unknown, but Google reports over 8,800 subscribers to the newsgroup through Google Groups.

Content-control software

content filteringfilteringWeb filtering
This software package, described as an "Internet filter", was part of a "Web starter kit" distributed by the Church.

Project Chanology

Chanologyleaked video interview of him promoting ScientologyOperation Reconnect
In 1995, attorneys for the Church of Scientology attempted to get the newsgroup alt.religion.scientology (a.r.s.) removed from Usenet.

Tilman Hausherr

Hausherr is well-known among critics of Scientology for his frequent Usenet posts and for maintaining a website critical of Scientology.

Scientology controversies

Scientology controversyDead Agentingdead agent
The "Religious Freedom Watch" site is often cited by alt.religion.scientology users as a contemporary example of "dead agenting".