Alvin Dark

Al Dark
Alvin Ralph Dark (January 7, 1922 – November 13, 2014), nicknamed "Blackie" and "The Swamp Fox", was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) shortstop and manager.wikipedia
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Major League Baseball Rookie of the Year Award

Rookie of the YearRookie of the Year AwardAL Rookie of the Year
Dark was named the major leagues' Rookie of the Year after batting .322 for the Boston Braves.

Ernie Banks

Banks
His .411 career slugging average was the seventh highest by an NL shortstop at his retirement, and his 126 home runs placed him behind only Ernie Banks and Travis Jackson.
Seeing that Musial was running to second, third baseman Alvin Dark ran to the backstop to retrieve the ball.

Lou Gehrig Memorial Award

Lou Gehrig Award
In he was awarded the first Lou Gehrig Memorial Award, given to the player who best exemplified Gehrig's character and integrity both on and off the field.
The inaugural winner was Alvin Dark.

1945 NFL Draft

19451940s NFL footballer1945 draft
This led to his getting drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in the 1945 NFL Draft.

Comanche, Oklahoma

Comanche
Dark was born in Comanche, Oklahoma.
*Alvin Dark, MLB player and manager

1951 World Series

1951World Series1951 World Series champion Yankees
In he batted .303 with 114 runs and a league-leading 41 doubles as the Giants won their first pennant since 1937; he hit .417 in the World Series against the New York Yankees, including a three-run home run in Game 1, though the Giants lost in six games.
The scored remained that way until the sixth when Alvin Dark's three-run home run gave the Giants a commanding 5–1 lead.

History of the New York Giants (baseball)

New York GiantsNew York GothamsGiants
He hit .300 or more three times while playing for the New York Giants, and became the first NL shortstop to hit 20 home runs more than once.
In addition to Bobby Thomson and Willie Mays, other memorable New York Giants of the 1950s include Hall of Fame manager Leo Durocher, coach Herman Franks, Hall of Fame outfielder Monte Irvin, outfielder and runner-up for the 1954 NL batting championship (won by Willie Mays) Don Mueller, Hall of Fame knuckleball relief pitcher Hoyt Wilhelm, starting pitchers Larry Jansen, Sal Maglie, Jim Hearn, Marv Grissom, Dave Koslo, Don Liddle, Max Lanier, Rubén Gómez, Al Worthington, and Johnny Antonelli, catcher Wes Westrum, catchers Ray Katt and Sal Yvars, shortstop Alvin Dark, third baseman Hank Thompson, first baseman Whitey Lockman, second basemen Davey Williams and Eddie Stanky, outfielder-pitcher Clint Hartung and utility men Johnny Mize, Bill Rigney, Daryl Spencer, Bobby Hofman, Joey Amalfitano, Tookie Gilbert, and 1954 Series hero Dusty Rhodes, among others.

Tony Taylor (baseball)

Tony Taylor
Anderson finally noticed that Musial was trying for second, took the new ball, and threw it to second baseman Tony Taylor.
Seeing that Musial was running to second, third baseman Alvin Dark ran to the backstop to retrieve the ball.

1954 World Series

1954World Seriesworld championship
In he batted .293 with 20 home runs and was fifth in the MVP voting as the Giants won another pennant; in the World Series against the heavily favored Indians, he batted .412 with a hit in every game, and the Giants pulled off an astonishing sweep to win their first championship since 1933.
Willie Mays (.345, 41 HRs 110 RBIs) led an offense that also featured Don Meuller (.342), Alvin Dark (.293, 98 runs), Hank Thompson (26 HRs, 86 RBIs) and pinch-hitter extraordinaire Dusty Rhodes (.341).

Ken Harrelson

Ken "Hawk" HarrelsonKen "The Hawk" HarrelsonHawk Harrelson
(Finley also released first baseman Ken Harrelson, who had been quoted as saying that Finley was a menace to the sport.)
His time with the Athletics ended abruptly in when Harrelson was quoted in a Washington newspaper calling team owner Charlie Finley "a menace to baseball" following the dismissal of manager Alvin Dark.

Stan Musial

MusialStan "The Man" MusialStan The Man
Stan Musial was at the plate, with a count of 3-1.
Seeing that Musial was trying for second, Alvin Dark ran to the backstop to retrieve the ball.

Willie Mays

MaysWillie[Willie] Mays
He responded that he had been severely misquoted; Willie Mays, whom he had named as team captain, came to his defense and calmed the team, and Jackie Robinson further noted, "I have found Dark to be a gentleman and, above all, unbiased. Our relationship has not only been on the ballfield but off it."
Alvin Dark was hired to manage the Giants before the start of the 1961 season and named Mays team captain.

Sammy Taylor (baseball)

Sammy Taylor
Bob Anderson's next pitch was errant, evading catcher Sammy Taylor and rolling all the way to the backstop.
Seeing that Musial was trying for second, Alvin Dark ran to the backstop to retrieve the ball.

1975 Oakland Athletics season

1975Oakland AthleticsOakland A
After the Athletics' victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1974 World Series under Alvin Dark, pitcher Catfish Hunter filed a grievance.

History of the Oakland Athletics

Kansas City AthleticsKansas City APhiladelphia Athletics
After serving one year as a coach for the Cubs, Dark was hired as an assistant to Kansas City Athletics owner Charlie Finley at season's end.
After the Athletics' victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1974 Series (under Alvin Dark), pitcher Catfish Hunter filed a grievance, claiming that the team had violated its contract with Hunter by failing to make timely payment on an insurance policy during the 1974 season as called for.

St. Louis Cardinals

St. Louis BrownsCardinalsSt. Louis
In June 1956 he was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals in a nine-player deal; he continued to hit well, and led the NL in putouts and double plays for the third time in 1957.

Vic Delmore

Umpire Vic Delmore called ball four, but Anderson and Taylor contended that Musial foul tipped the ball.
Seeing that Musial was trying for second, third baseman Alvin Dark ran to the backstop to retrieve the ball.

Pat Pieper

The ball wound up in the hands of field announcer Pat Pieper, but Dark ended up getting it back anyway.
Seeing that Musial was trying for second, third baseman Alvin Dark ran to the backstop to retrieve the ball.

1961 San Francisco Giants season

1961San Francisco GiantsGiants
The Giants were managed by Alvin Dark.

Bob Anderson (baseball)

Bob Anderson
Bob Anderson's next pitch was errant, evading catcher Sammy Taylor and rolling all the way to the backstop.
Seeing that Musial was breaking for second, Cubs third baseman Alvin Dark ran to the backstop to retrieve the ball, however that ball wound up in the hands of field announcer Pat Pieper, but Dark ended up getting it back anyway.

1962 World Series

1962World SeriesWorld Champions
Dark quickly became a successful manager, winning a pennant with the Giants in, but losing the 1962 World Series in seven games to the Yankees.

Dick Williams

In the meantime, the Athletics had moved to Oakland, and after manager Dick Williams resigned following consecutive World Series triumphs in 1972-73, Finley rehired Dark.
The change in management, though, did not alter the fortunes of the Angels, as they finished in last place, 22 games behind the A's, who would win their third straight World Championship under Williams' replacement, Alvin Dark.

Horace Stoneham

Dark weathered the imbroglio, but Giants owner Horace Stoneham fired him during the sixth inning of the last game of the season, with the team about to finish in fourth place.
He also hired as his manager from 1961–64 Alvin Dark, who had a brilliant baseball mind but a poor relationship with at least some of his minority players.