Amadas

Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion

Medieval English chivalric romance, one of the rare ones for which there is neither a known nor a conjectured French original, like Sir Eglamour of Artois.

- Amadas

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Chivalric romance

Type of prose and verse narrative that was popular in the noble courts of High Medieval and Early Modern Europe.

Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion
Holger Danske, or Ogier the Dane, from the Matter of France
A knight rescues a lady from a dragon.

In reality, a number of "non-cyclical" romances were written without any such connection; these include such romances as King Horn, Robert the Devil, Ipomadon, Emaré, Havelok the Dane,Roswall and Lillian, Le Bone Florence of Rome, and Amadas.

Sir Cleges

Medieval English verse chivalric romance written in tail-rhyme stanzas in the late fourteenth or early fifteenth century.

Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion

The figure of the Spendthrift Knight shows probable influence of the romance Amadas.

Grateful dead (folklore)

Both a motif and a group of related folktales present in many cultures throughout the world.

Netherlandish Proverbs by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1559

The chivalric romance Amadas has the title knight pay his last coins for such a burial.

Sir Launfal

1045-line Middle English romance or Breton lay written by Thomas Chestre dating from the late 14th century.

A knight who, through his own generosity, falls into debt and poverty, and consequent misery, is depicted in at least two other late medieval Middle English works, Sir Amadace, and Sir Cleges.

Tail rhyme

Family of stanzaic verse forms used in poetry in French and especially English during and since the Middle Ages, and probably derived from models in medieval Latin versification.

The Parnassus (1511) by Raphael: famous poets recite alongside the nine Muses atop Mount Parnassus.

A non-exhaustive list of examples includes The Wedding of Sir Gawain and Dame Ragnelle and part of Beves of Hamtoun in six-line tail rhyme stanzas; one version of the Middle English Octavian, in what would go on to be called the "Burns stanza"; Sir Amadace, Sir Gowther Sir Isumbras, The King of Tars and one version of Ipomadon in twelve-line tail rhyme stanzas; and Sir Degrevant and, as noted above, Sir Perceval of Galles in sixteen-line stanzas.

The Avowing of Arthur

Anonymous Middle English romance in 16-line tail-rhyme stanzas telling of the adventures of its four heroes in and around Carlisle and Inglewood Forest.

This manuscript, probably indited around the middle of the 15th century in Lancashire, also contains two other romances, The Awntyrs off Arthure and Sir Amadace.