Amarna letters

AmarnaAmarna letterAmarna correspondenceAmarna TabletsformulaMitanni letter7 and 7Akkadian Amarna lettersAmarna CanaaniteAmarna series of diplomatic correspondence
The Amarna letters (sometimes referred to as the Amarna correspondence or Amarna tablets, and cited with the abbreviation EA) are an archive, written on clay tablets, primarily consisting of diplomatic correspondence between the Egyptian administration and its representatives in Canaan and Amurru during the New Kingdom, between c.wikipedia
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Canaan

Canaaniteland of CanaanCanaanites
The Amarna letters (sometimes referred to as the Amarna correspondence or Amarna tablets, and cited with the abbreviation EA) are an archive, written on clay tablets, primarily consisting of diplomatic correspondence between the Egyptian administration and its representatives in Canaan and Amurru during the New Kingdom, between c. 1360-1332 BC (see here for dates). These tablets shed much light on Egyptian relations with Babylonia, Assyria, Syria, Canaan, and Alashiya (Cyprus) as well as relations with the Mitanni, and the Hittites.
It appears as 𒆳𒆠𒈾𒄴𒈾 ( KUR ki-na-ah-na) in the Amarna letters (14th century BC), and knʿn is found on coins from Phoenicia in the last half of the 1st millennium.

Byblos

GebalGibeletGubla
Other rulers involved in the letters include Tushratta of Mitanni, Lib'ayu of Shechem, Abdi-Heba of Jerusalem, and the quarrelsome king, Rib-Hadda, of Byblos, who, in over 58 letters, continuously pleads for Egyptian military help.
Byblos appears as Kebny in Egyptian hieroglyphic records going back to the 4th-dynasty pharaoh Sneferu (BC) and as Gubla in the Akkadian cuneiform Amarna letters to the 18th-dynasty pharaohs Amenhotep III and IV.

Amarna letter EA 2

EA 2EA# 2EA2
Amarna Letter EA2 is the letter of the Amarna series of inscriptions designated EA2, which is inscribed with cuneiform writing showing the continuation of a correspondence between Kadašman-Enlil I and Amenḥotep III, from EA1.

Amarna letter EA 15

EA 15EA# 15
Amarna letter EA 15, from Ashur-uballit I; see also Amarna letter EA 153.
Amarna letter EA 15, titled: "Assyria Joins the International Scene" is a shorter-length clay tablet Amarna letter from Ashur-uballit I of the "Land of Assyria", (line 3 of EA 15).

British Museum

the British MuseumBrit. Mus.British
Either 202 or 203 tablets are at the Vorderasiatisches Museum in Berlin; 99 are at the British Museum in London; 49 or 50 are at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo; 7 at the Louvre in Paris; 3 at the Pushkin Museum in Moscow; and 1 in the collection of the Oriental Institute in Chicago.
Amarna Tablets, 99 out of 382 tablets found, second greatest collection in the world after the Vorderasiatisches Museum, Berlin (203 tablets), (1350 BC)

Amarna letter EA 26

EA 2626EA# 26
Amarna letter EA 26, titled: "To the Queen Mother: Some Missing Gold Statues" is a shorter-length clay tablet Amarna letter from Tushratta of Mittani.

Amarna letter EA 10

EA 10EA10EA# 10
Amarna Letter EA10 (see here: ) is the letter of the Amarna series of diplomatic correspondence designated EA 10, which is written in cuneiform writing showing the continuation of a correspondence between Burna-Buriash II (otherwise known as Burra-Buriyaš) an ancient king of Babylon (named Karduniaš in the 1350BC Amarna timeperiod), and Akhenaten (also known as Amenophis III), an ancient pharaoh of Egypt.

Kadashman-Enlil I

Kadašman-Enlil IKadashman-EnlilKadašman-Enlil
Letters from the Babylonian king, Kadashman-Enlil I, anchor the timeframe of Akhenaten's reign to the mid-14th century BC. They also contain the first mention of a Near Eastern group known as the Habiru, whose possible connection with the Hebrews — due to the similarity of the words and their geographic location — remains debated.
He is known to have been a contemporary of Amenhotep III of Egypt, with whom he corresponded (Amarna letters).

Amarna

EAAkhetatenel-Amarna
The letters were found in Upper Egypt at el-Amarna, the modern name for the ancient Egyptian capital of Akhetaten, founded by pharaoh Akhenaten (1350s – 1330s BC) during the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt.
Located behind the Royal Residence was the Bureau of Correspondence of Pharaoh, where the Amarna Letters were found.

Amarna letter EA 34

EA 34EA# 34
Amarna letter EA 34, titled: "The Pharaoh's Reproach Answered" is a moderately tall clay tablet Amarna letter from the King of Alashiya.

Amarna letter EA 38

EA 38EA# 38
One identifier of many of the Amarna letters, is the use of paragraphing.

Amarna letter EA 39

EA 39EA# 39
The Amarna letters, about 300, numbered up to EA 382, are a mid 14th century BC, about 1350 BC and 20–25 years later, correspondence.

Amenhotep III

Amenḥotep IIINapḫurureyaAmenhotep III the Magnificent
It includes correspondence from Akhenaten's reign (Akhenaten who was also titled Amenhotep IV), as well as his predecessor Amenhotep III's reign.
Proof of this is shown by the diplomatic correspondence from the rulers of Assyria, Mitanni, Babylon, and Hatti which is preserved in the archive of Amarna Letters; these letters document frequent requests by these rulers for gold and numerous other gifts from the pharaoh.

Canaano-Akkadian language

227–380 Canaan (written mostly in the Canaano-Akkadian language).
Canaano-Akkadian is an ancient Semitic language which was the written language of the Amarna letters from Canaan.

Akhenaten

AkhnatonAmenhotep IVIV
The letters were found in Upper Egypt at el-Amarna, the modern name for the ancient Egyptian capital of Akhetaten, founded by pharaoh Akhenaten (1350s – 1330s BC) during the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt. It includes correspondence from Akhenaten's reign (Akhenaten who was also titled Amenhotep IV), as well as his predecessor Amenhotep III's reign.
The Amarna Letters, a cache of diplomatic correspondence discovered in modern times at el-Amarna (the modern designation of the site of Akhetaten), have provided important evidence about Akhenaten's reign and foreign policy.

Amarna letter EA 1

EA 1EA# 1EA1
These tablets were discovered in el-Amarna and are therefore known as the Amarna letters.

Amarna letter EA 59

EA 59EA# 58
Amarna letter EA 59, titled: "From the Citizens of Tunip" is a short-, to moderate-length clay tablet Amarna letter from the city-state of Tunip, written to the Pharaoh of Egypt.

Alashiya

AlashijaAlašiyaAncient state Alashiya
These tablets shed much light on Egyptian relations with Babylonia, Assyria, Syria, Canaan, and Alashiya (Cyprus) as well as relations with the Mitanni, and the Hittites.
Some of the Amarna letters are from the king or the ministers of Alashiya.

Burna-Buriash II

Burna-Buriaš IIKara-ḫardašNazi-Bugaš
The diplomatic correspondence between Burna-Buriaš and the pharaohs is preserved in nine of the Amarna letters, designated EA (for El Amarna) 6 to 14. The relationship between Babylon and Egypt during his reign was friendly at the start, and a marriage alliance was in the making.

Rib-Hadda

Rib-HaddiRib-HadiKing Rib-Hadda
Other rulers involved in the letters include Tushratta of Mitanni, Lib'ayu of Shechem, Abdi-Heba of Jerusalem, and the quarrelsome king, Rib-Hadda, of Byblos, who, in over 58 letters, continuously pleads for Egyptian military help.
He is the author of some sixty of the Amarna letters all to Akhenaten.

Amarna letter EA 100

EA 100EA#100
Amarna letter EA 100, titled: "The City of Irqata to the King" is a short-, to moderate-length clay tablet Amarna letter from the city-state of Irqata, (modern Arqa), written to the Pharaoh of Egypt.

Tunip

Tunip was a city-state in western Syria in 1350–1335 BC, the period of the Amarna letters.

Beirut

Beirut, LebanonBerytusBayrūt
The first historical mention of Beirut is found in the Amarna letters from the New Kingdom of Egypt, which date to the 15th century BC.

Amarna letter EA 147

EA 147EA#147
Amarna letter EA 147, titled: "A Hymn to the Pharaoh" is a moderate length clay tablet Amarna letter (mid 14th century BC) from Abimilku of Tyre-(called Ṣurru in the Abimilku letters, and an island, until the time of Alexander the Great, 330 BC).

Amarna letter EA 149

EA 149EA#149
Amarna letter EA 149, titled: "Neither Water nor Wood" is a moderate- to extended-length clay tablet Amarna letter (mid 14th century BC) from Abimilku of Tyre-(called Ṣurru in the letters), written to the Pharaoh of Egypt.