Amazon rainforest

AmazonAmazoniaAmazon jungleAmazonianAmazon ForestAmazon rain forestAmazonian forestAmazôniaEcuadorian AmazonAmazonian rainforest
The Amazon rainforest, also known in English as Amazonia or the Amazon Jungle, is a moist broadleaf tropical rainforest in the Amazon biome that covers most of the Amazon basin of South America.wikipedia
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Amazon biome

AmazonAmazoniaAmazonian
The Amazon rainforest, also known in English as Amazonia or the Amazon Jungle, is a moist broadleaf tropical rainforest in the Amazon biome that covers most of the Amazon basin of South America.
The Amazon biome (Bioma Amazônia) contains the Amazon rainforest, an area of tropical rainforest, and other ecoregions that cover most of the Amazon basin and some adjacent areas to the north and east.

Peruvian Amazonia

Peruvian AmazonAmazonian PeruAmazon
The majority of the forest is contained within Brazil, with 60% of the rainforest, followed by Peru with 13%, Colombia with 10%, and with minor amounts in Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia, Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana.
Peruvian Amazonia (Amazonía del Perú) is the area of the Amazon rainforest included within the country of Peru, from east of the Andes to the borders with Ecuador, Colombia, Brazil and Bolivia.

Guiana Amazonian Park

Four nations have "Amazonas" as the name of one of their first-level administrative regions and France uses the name "Guiana Amazonian Park" for its rainforest protected area.
Guiana Amazonian Park (Parc amazonien de Guyane) is the largest National Park of France, aiming at protecting part of the Amazonian forest located in French Guiana which covers 41% of the region.

Yanomami

YanomamoYa̧nomamöYanomami people
The accounts of missionaries to the area in the borderlands between Brazil and Venezuela have recounted constant infighting in the Yanomami tribes.
The Yanomami, also spelled Yąnomamö or Yanomama, are a group of approximately 35,000 indigenous people who live in some 200–250 villages in the Amazon rainforest on the border between Venezuela and Brazil.

Shrunken head

shrunken headshead shrinkinghead-shrinking
Several tribes of the Jivaroan group, including the Shuar, practised headhunting for trophies and headshrinking.
Headhunting has occurred in many regions of the world, but the practice of headshrinking has only been documented in the northwestern region of the Amazon rainforest.

Rainforest

rain forestrainforestsemergent
The Amazon rainforest, also known in English as Amazonia or the Amazon Jungle, is a moist broadleaf tropical rainforest in the Amazon biome that covers most of the Amazon basin of South America.
Tropical rainforests exist in Southeast Asia (from Myanmar (Burma)) to the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and Sri Lanka; also in Sub-Saharan Africa from the Cameroon to the Congo (Congo Rainforest), South America (e.g. the Amazon rainforest), Central America (e.g. Bosawás, the southern Yucatán Peninsula-El Peten-Belize-Calakmul), Australia, and on Pacific Islands (such as Hawaii).

Amazon natural region

Colombian AmazonAmazon RegionAmazon Region of Colombia
The majority of the forest is contained within Brazil, with 60% of the rainforest, followed by Peru with 13%, Colombia with 10%, and with minor amounts in Venezuela, Ecuador, Bolivia, Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana.
The region is mostly covered by tropical rainforest, or jungle, which is a part of the massive Amazon rainforest.

Amazon rubber boom

rubber boomrubberrubber baron
During the Amazon rubber boom it is estimated that diseases brought by immigrants, such as typhus and malaria, killed 40,000 native Amazonians.
The Amerindians in the Amazon rainforest developed ways to extract rubber from the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), a member of the family Euphorbiaceae.

Amazon basin

AmazonAmazon regionAmazonian
The Amazon rainforest, also known in English as Amazonia or the Amazon Jungle, is a moist broadleaf tropical rainforest in the Amazon biome that covers most of the Amazon basin of South America.
Most of the basin is covered by the Amazon Rainforest, also known as Amazonia.

Bodélé Depression

BodeleBodéléDjourab Depression
More than 56% of the dust fertilizing the Amazon rainforest comes from the Bodélé depression in Northern Chad in the Sahara desert.
The dry endorheic basin is a major source of fertile dust essential for the Amazon rainforest.

Deforestation in Brazil

deforestationBrazilDeforestation in the Brazilian Amazon
Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon rose more than 88% in June 2019 compared with the same month in 2018.
Since 1970, over 700,000 km2 of the Amazon rainforest have been destroyed.

Geoglyph

geoglyphs
Since the 1970s, numerous geoglyphs have been discovered on deforested land dating between AD 1–1250, furthering claims about Pre-Columbian civilizations.
Since the 1970s, numerous geoglyphs have been discovered on deforested land in the Amazon rainforest, Brazil, leading to claims about Pre-Columbian civilizations.

Varig Flight 254

flight 254
On 3 September 1989, Varig Flight 254 crashed into the Amazon, killing 13 out of the 54 people on board.
Prior to takeoff from Marabá, the crew entered an incorrect heading into the flight computer, flying deep into a remote area of the Amazon jungle.

Tropics

tropicaltropictropical zone
The Amazon rainforest, also known in English as Amazonia or the Amazon Jungle, is a moist broadleaf tropical rainforest in the Amazon biome that covers most of the Amazon basin of South America.
Some examples of important biodiversity and high endemism ecosystems are El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico, Costa Rican and Nicaraguan rainforests, Amazon Rainforest territories of several South American countries, Madagascar dry deciduous forests, the Waterberg Biosphere of South Africa, and eastern Madagascar rainforests.

Amazon insects

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The region is home to about 2.5 million insect species, tens of thousands of plants, and some 2,000 birds and mammals.
The Amazon Rainforest and surrounding region is the most biodiverse on earth and no life form is more diverse than the insects of the Amazon.

Brazil

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Scientists have described between 96,660 and 128,843 invertebrate species in Brazil alone.
Its Amazon River basin includes a vast tropical forest, home to diverse wildlife, a variety of ecological systems, and extensive natural resources spanning numerous protected habitats.

Amazonas

Amazonas (disambiguation)
Four nations have "Amazonas" as the name of one of their first-level administrative regions and France uses the name "Guiana Amazonian Park" for its rainforest protected area.

Acre (state)

AcreAcre stateAC
Ondemar Dias is accredited with first discovering the geoglyphs in 1977, and Alceu Ranzi is credited with furthering their discovery after flying over Acre.
The Amazon Rainforest covers all of the state territory.

Unnatural Histories

The BBC's Unnatural Histories presents evidence that Orellana, rather than exaggerating his claims as previously thought, was correct in his observations that a complex civilization was flourishing along the Amazon in the 1540s.
The final episode looks at the Amazon rainforest - billed as the world's last great wilderness.

Tropical rainforest

tropical rain foresttropical rainforeststropical rain forests
The Amazon represents over half of the planet's remaining rainforests, and comprises the largest and most biodiverse tract of tropical rainforest in the world, with an estimated 390 billion individual trees divided into 16,000 species.
The moisture from the forests is important to the rainfall in Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina Deforestation in the Amazon rainforest region was one of the main reason that cause the severe Drought of 2014-2015 in Brazil

Amazon River

AmazonRiver AmazonUpper Amazon
The first European to travel the length of the Amazon River was Francisco de Orellana in 1542.
The low river banks are interrupted by only a few hills, and the river enters the enormous Amazon rainforest.

Trans-Amazonian Highway

BR-230Trans-Amazon HighwayConstruction of the Trans-Amazonian Highway
In the 1970s, construction began on the Trans-Amazonian highway.
It runs through the Amazon forest and the Brazilian states of Paraíba, Ceará, Piaui, Maranhão, Tocantins, Pará and Amazonas, from the proximities of Saboeiro up until the town of Lábrea.

Tree

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The total number of tree species in the region is estimated at 16,000.
In tropical regions with a monsoon or monsoon-like climate, where a drier part of the year alternates with a wet period as in the Amazon rainforest, different species of broad-leaved trees dominate the forest, some of them being deciduous.

Deforestation

deforestedland clearingforest clearing
Deforestation is the conversion of forested areas to non-forested areas.
An area the size of a football pitch is cleared from the Amazon rainforest every minute, with 136 e6acre of rainforest cleared for animal agriculture overall.

Pre-Columbian era

pre-Columbianpre-Hispanicprehispanic
Since the 1970s, numerous geoglyphs have been discovered on deforested land dating between AD 1–1250, furthering claims about Pre-Columbian civilizations.
From the 1970s, numerous geoglyphs have been discovered on deforested land in the Amazon rainforest, Brazil, supporting Spanish accounts of a complex, possibly ancient Amazonian civilization.