Amber Road

Amber RouteAmberamber tradeAmber TrailAmber Pathamber routesamber trade routeBaltic amberBaltic amber trade routeBernsteinstraße
The Amber Road was an ancient trade route for the transfer of amber from coastal areas of the North Sea and the Baltic Sea to the Mediterranean Sea.wikipedia
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Trade route

trade routesexport goodtrading route
The Amber Road was an ancient trade route for the transfer of amber from coastal areas of the North Sea and the Baltic Sea to the Mediterranean Sea.
Among notable trade routes was the Amber Road, which served as a dependable network for long-distance trade.

Lithuania

LTURepublic of LithuaniaLithuanian
In Roman times, a main route ran south from the Baltic coast (modern Lithuania) through the land of the Boii (modern Czech Republic and Slovakia) to the head of the Adriatic Sea (Aquileia by the modern Gulf of Venice).
The Baltic tribes did not maintain close cultural or political contacts with the Roman Empire, but they did maintain trade contacts (see Amber Road).

Dnieper

Dnieper RiverDnieprDniepr River
As an important commodity, sometimes dubbed "the gold of the north", amber was transported from the North Sea and Baltic Sea coasts overland by way of the Vistula and Dnieper rivers to Italy, Greece, the Black Sea, Syria and Egypt over a period of thousands of years.
In antiquity, the river was known to the Greeks as the Borysthenes and was part of the Amber Road.

Truso

The Old Prussian towns of Kaup and Truso on the Baltic were the starting points of the route to the south.
It was one of the trading posts on the Amber Road, and is thought to be the antecedent of the city of Elbląg (Elbing).

Amber

Burmese amberamber fossilresinite
The Amber Road was an ancient trade route for the transfer of amber from coastal areas of the North Sea and the Baltic Sea to the Mediterranean Sea.
It is assumed that there were well-established trade routes for amber connecting the Baltic with the Mediterranean (known as the "Amber Road").

Palanga Amber Museum

Palanga Botanical GardenAmber MuseumLithuania
The shortest (and possibly oldest) road avoids alpine areas and led from the Baltic coastline (nowadays Lithuania and Poland), through Biskupin, Milicz, Wrocław, passed the Moravian Gate, followed the river Morava, crossed the Danube near Carnuntum in the Noricum Province, headed southwest past Poetovio, Celeia, Emona, Nauportus, and reached Patavium and Aquileia at the Adriatic coast.
The Baltic Sea coast has been a source of Eurasian amber trade since prehistoric times (see Amber Road).

Wrocław

BreslauWroclawBreslau (Wrocław)
The shortest (and possibly oldest) road avoids alpine areas and led from the Baltic coastline (nowadays Lithuania and Poland), through Biskupin, Milicz, Wrocław, passed the Moravian Gate, followed the river Morava, crossed the Danube near Carnuntum in the Noricum Province, headed southwest past Poetovio, Celeia, Emona, Nauportus, and reached Patavium and Aquileia at the Adriatic coast.
Wrocław originated at the intersection of two trade routes, the Via Regia and the Amber Road.

Milicz

MilitschLandkreis Militsch
The shortest (and possibly oldest) road avoids alpine areas and led from the Baltic coastline (nowadays Lithuania and Poland), through Biskupin, Milicz, Wrocław, passed the Moravian Gate, followed the river Morava, crossed the Danube near Carnuntum in the Noricum Province, headed southwest past Poetovio, Celeia, Emona, Nauportus, and reached Patavium and Aquileia at the Adriatic coast.
Milicz developed as route of the ancient Amber Trade Route known as the Amber Road.

Slovakia

SlovakSVKSlovak Republic
In Roman times, a main route ran south from the Baltic coast (modern Lithuania) through the land of the Boii (modern Czech Republic and Slovakia) to the head of the Adriatic Sea (Aquileia by the modern Gulf of Venice).
Various ancient trade routes, such as the Amber Road and the Danube waterway, have crossed territory of present-day Bratislava.

Moravian Gate

The shortest (and possibly oldest) road avoids alpine areas and led from the Baltic coastline (nowadays Lithuania and Poland), through Biskupin, Milicz, Wrocław, passed the Moravian Gate, followed the river Morava, crossed the Danube near Carnuntum in the Noricum Province, headed southwest past Poetovio, Celeia, Emona, Nauportus, and reached Patavium and Aquileia at the Adriatic coast.
Here ran the most important trade routes, such as the Amber Road from the Baltic to the Adriatic coast, as well as roads from the Czech lands to Upper Silesia and Lesser Poland.

Carnuntum

Archaeological Park CarnuntumHeidentorHeidentor (Pagan gate)
The shortest (and possibly oldest) road avoids alpine areas and led from the Baltic coastline (nowadays Lithuania and Poland), through Biskupin, Milicz, Wrocław, passed the Moravian Gate, followed the river Morava, crossed the Danube near Carnuntum in the Noricum Province, headed southwest past Poetovio, Celeia, Emona, Nauportus, and reached Patavium and Aquileia at the Adriatic coast.
In Roman times Carnuntum had a history as a major trading centre for amber, brought from the north to traders who sold it in Italy; the main arm of the Amber Road crossed the Danube at Carnuntum.

Gulf of Venice

Northern Adriatic
In Roman times, a main route ran south from the Baltic coast (modern Lithuania) through the land of the Boii (modern Czech Republic and Slovakia) to the head of the Adriatic Sea (Aquileia by the modern Gulf of Venice).
In antiquity the gulf was southern terminus of Amber Road.

Palanga

PolangenPalanga (Polangen)Palanga, Lithuania
Situated upon the trail of the ancient Amber Road, it became a center of trade and crafts.

Latvia

Republic of LatviaLatvianLAT
There is a tourist route stretching along the Baltic coast from Kaliningrad to Latvia called "Amber Road".
This led to the development of the Amber Road.

North Sea

Norththe North SeaNorthern Sea
The Amber Road was an ancient trade route for the transfer of amber from coastal areas of the North Sea and the Baltic Sea to the Mediterranean Sea.

Baltic Sea

BalticBaltic coastthe Baltic
The Amber Road was an ancient trade route for the transfer of amber from coastal areas of the North Sea and the Baltic Sea to the Mediterranean Sea.

Mediterranean Sea

MediterraneanMediterranean coastWestern Mediterranean
The Amber Road was an ancient trade route for the transfer of amber from coastal areas of the North Sea and the Baltic Sea to the Mediterranean Sea.

Vistula

Vistula RiverRiver VistulaVistula delta
As an important commodity, sometimes dubbed "the gold of the north", amber was transported from the North Sea and Baltic Sea coasts overland by way of the Vistula and Dnieper rivers to Italy, Greece, the Black Sea, Syria and Egypt over a period of thousands of years.
The Baltic Sea– Vistula– Dnieper– Black Sea route with its rivers was one of the most ancient trade routes, the Amber Road, on which amber and other items were traded from Northern Europe to Greece, Asia, Egypt, and elsewhere.

Italy

ItalianITAItalia
As an important commodity, sometimes dubbed "the gold of the north", amber was transported from the North Sea and Baltic Sea coasts overland by way of the Vistula and Dnieper rivers to Italy, Greece, the Black Sea, Syria and Egypt over a period of thousands of years.

Greece

GreekHellenic RepublicGreeks
As an important commodity, sometimes dubbed "the gold of the north", amber was transported from the North Sea and Baltic Sea coasts overland by way of the Vistula and Dnieper rivers to Italy, Greece, the Black Sea, Syria and Egypt over a period of thousands of years.

Black Sea

BlackEuxinePontus Euxinus
As an important commodity, sometimes dubbed "the gold of the north", amber was transported from the North Sea and Baltic Sea coasts overland by way of the Vistula and Dnieper rivers to Italy, Greece, the Black Sea, Syria and Egypt over a period of thousands of years.

Syria

Syrian Arab RepublicSyrianEtymology of Syria
As an important commodity, sometimes dubbed "the gold of the north", amber was transported from the North Sea and Baltic Sea coasts overland by way of the Vistula and Dnieper rivers to Italy, Greece, the Black Sea, Syria and Egypt over a period of thousands of years.

Egypt

EgyptianEGYArab Republic of Egypt
As an important commodity, sometimes dubbed "the gold of the north", amber was transported from the North Sea and Baltic Sea coasts overland by way of the Vistula and Dnieper rivers to Italy, Greece, the Black Sea, Syria and Egypt over a period of thousands of years.

Tutankhamun

TutankhamenKing TutKing Tutankhamun
The breast ornament of the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamen (c.

Heinrich Schliemann

SchliemannHeinrich SchliemanHeinrich-Schliemann
Heinrich Schliemann found Baltic amber beads at Mycenae, as shown by spectroscopic investigation.