Ambroise Thomas

Thomas by Wilhelm Benque, c. 1895
Thomas in 1834 by Jean-Hippolyte Flandrin
Le caïd, 1849
Jean-Baptiste Faure as Hamlet, painted by Manet
Thomas, about 1865
Statue of Thomas in Paris.

French composer and teacher, best known for his operas Mignon (1866) and Hamlet (1868).

- Ambroise Thomas
Thomas by Wilhelm Benque, c. 1895

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Poster for the premiere, by Jules Chéret

Mignon

Poster for the premiere, by Jules Chéret
Célestine Galli-Marié created the role of Mignon at the première.
Marie Cabel as Philine
Mignon verlangende naar haar vaderland, by Ary Scheffer, 1836 (Dordrechts Museum)

Mignon is an 1866 opéra comique (or opera in its second version) in three acts by Ambroise Thomas.

Poster for the premiere

Hamlet (Thomas)

Poster for the premiere
Harriet Smithson as Ophelia (1827)
Alexandre Dumas, père
Cover of the piano-vocal score of Thomas' Hamlet (1868)
Jean-Baptiste Faure as Hamlet; by Édouard Manet in 1877
Christine Nilsson as Ophélie
Rehearsal for the 1875 revival at the Palais Garnier
Act 2, scene 2: setting by Charles-Antoine Cambon for the original production at the Paris Opéra (Salle Le Peletier)
Nellie Melba as Ophélie, by Henri Gervex
Mignon Nevada as Ophélie

Hamlet is a grand opera in five acts of 1868 by the French composer Ambroise Thomas, with a libretto by Michel Carré and Jules Barbier based on a French adaptation by Alexandre Dumas, père, and Paul Meurice of William Shakespeare's play Hamlet.

Current home of the CNSMDP

Conservatoire de Paris

College of music and dance founded in 1795.

College of music and dance founded in 1795.

Current home of the CNSMDP
Former Conservatoire building (until 1911) in the 9th arrondissement of Paris, which now houses the CNSAD (48.87307°N, 2.347°W)
Site plan (1836) of the Menus-Plaisirs, the Concert Hall, and the Conservatoire
A concert in March 1843
Library, 1895
Camille Urso
Piano class of Charles de Bériot in 1895 with Maurice Ravel on the left
Fauré in the Director's Office at the Conservatoire, 1918
The CNSMDP new building at the Cité de la Musique.

Under Auber, composition teachers included Adolphe Adam, Halévy, and Ambroise Thomas; piano teachers, Louise Farrenc, Henri Herz, and Antoine François Marmontel; violin teachers, Jean-Delphin Alard and Charles Dancla; and cello teachers, Pierre Chevillard and Auguste Franchomme.

Massenet photographed by Pierre Petit, 1880

Jules Massenet

French composer of the Romantic era best known for his operas, of which he wrote more than thirty.

French composer of the Romantic era best known for his operas, of which he wrote more than thirty.

Massenet photographed by Pierre Petit, 1880
Massenet's birthplace in Montaud, photographed c. 1908
Massenet in the early 1860s
Auditorium of the Opéra-Comique
Poster for the première of Don César de Bazan by Célestin Nanteuil
Design by Philippe Chaperon for Le roi de Lahore, 1877
"M. Massenet's bland pâtisserie and Mlle. Sanderson's sugar-candy notes" baked in "the National Musical Oven". Caricature from La Silhouette, March 1894.
Poster for the first French production of Werther.
Mary Garden in the title role of Chérubin, 1905
Poster by Georges Rochegrosse for the 1912 Paris première of Roma.
Poster by Jean de Paleologu for ''Sapho, 1897
Poster by Georges Rochegrosse for Don Quichotte, 1910
Among Massenet's interpreters, clockwise from top left: Pierre Monteux, Renée Fleming, Roberto Alagna and Victoria de los Ángeles
Massenet in his later years

There he studied under Ambroise Thomas, whom he greatly admired.

Portrait of Daniel Auber, 1827, by Hortense Haudebourt-Lescot

Daniel Auber

French composer and director of the Paris Conservatoire.

French composer and director of the Paris Conservatoire.

Portrait of Daniel Auber, 1827, by Hortense Haudebourt-Lescot
Auber's father, c. 1806
Auber, c. 1830
Eugène Scribe, Auber's principal librettist from 1822 to 1860
Le Cheval de bronze, 1835
Auber by Nadar, late 1860s
Le premier jour de bonheur (1868)
La Muette de Portici, 1828
Opening of Benedictus No 2, for voice, harp and organ, c. 1855

During his 42 years as a member he was joined by composers including Adolphe Adam, Hector Berlioz, Charles Gounod and Ambroise Thomas.

Melba, c. 1907

Nellie Melba

Australian operatic soprano.

Australian operatic soprano.

Melba, c. 1907
Melba, drawn by Frank Haviland
Melba in costume for Lucia di Lammermoor, 1888 (photo by Nadar)
Philippe, Duke of Orléans
Melba as Marguerite in Faust
Melba in 1904
Melba in 1913
Melba with the Metropolitan Opera
Newspaper advertisement
HMV advertisement for Melba recordings (1904)
Statue of Melba at Waterfront City, Melbourne Docklands

She then went to Paris to study with the leading teacher Mathilde Marchesi, who instantly recognised the young singer's potential: she exclaimed, "J'ai enfin une étoile! ("I have a star at last!"). Melba made such rapid progress that she was allowed to sing the "Mad Scene" from Ambroise Thomas's Hamlet at a matinée musicale in Marchesi's house in December the same year, in the presence of the composer.

Dubois in 1896, the year he became director of the Paris Conservatoire

Théodore Dubois

French Romantic composer, organist, and music teacher.

French Romantic composer, organist, and music teacher.

Dubois in 1896, the year he became director of the Paris Conservatoire
Villa de Medici, Rome
Dubois' colleagues in the Société nationale de musique: clockwise from top left: Romain Bussine, Camille Saint-Saëns, Gabriel Fauré, César Franck
1902 caricature of Dubois by Aroun-al-Rascid
Dubois in 1905

He became an organist and choirmaster at several well-known churches in Paris, and at the same time was a professor at the Conservatoire, teaching harmony from 1871 to 1891 and composition from 1891 to 1896, when he succeeded Ambroise Thomas as the Conservatoire's director.

Fauré in 1907

Gabriel Fauré

French composer, organist, pianist and teacher.

French composer, organist, pianist and teacher.

Fauré in 1907
Fauré as a student, 1864
Staff and students of the École Niedermeyer, 1871. Fauré in front row second from left; André Messager in middle row second from right
Fauré in 1875
Fauré by John Singer Sargent, 1889
Fauré and Marie in 1889
Emma Bardac
Clockwise from top left: Saint-Saëns, Thomas, Massenet, Dubois
Maurice Ravel
Fauré at the turn of the century
National hommage to Fauré, 1922. Fauré and President Millerand are in the box between the statues
Manuscript page of the Requiem

The faculty of the Conservatoire regarded Fauré as dangerously modern, and its head, Ambroise Thomas, blocked the appointment, declaring, "Fauré? Never! If he's appointed, I resign."

Clockwise from top: overview of city center (with Cathedral of Saint Stephen), Imperial Quarter, Temple Neuf, Germans' Gate, Opéra-Théâtre (place de la Comédie)

Metz

City in northeast France located at the confluence of the Moselle and the Seille rivers.

City in northeast France located at the confluence of the Moselle and the Seille rivers.

Clockwise from top: overview of city center (with Cathedral of Saint Stephen), Imperial Quarter, Temple Neuf, Germans' Gate, Opéra-Théâtre (place de la Comédie)
Henry II of France entering Metz in 1552, putting an end to the Republic of Metz.
Paul Verlaine by Edmond Aman-Jean, 1892, oil on canvas, Golden Courtyard museums
The city hall on the Place d'Armes.
Street in old city
The Centre Pompidou-Metz, a symbol of modern Metz
The Music Box, a high-quality concert and recording studio venue dedicated to the modern forms of art music, in the Borny District. The venue has been erected in a cité HLM as an urban renewal effort
Water games on the Islands District
The Germans' Gate from the 13th century, one of the last medieval bridge castles found in France. Today, an exhibition hall
Rue Serpenoise, in the main pedestrian area.
Some of the cultural venues in Metz, clockwise from top: the Arsenal, the Golden Courtyard, the Opera House, and the Saint-Jacques square
The Museum of the 1870 War and of the Annexion, the only museum in Europe dedicated to the Franco-Prussian War
The choir of the Saint Stephen's Cathedral with its extensive stained glass windows, including works of Marc Chagall
Basilica of Saint-Pierre-aux-Nonnains, the oldest church in France and cradle of the Gregorian Chant
The Covered Market, home to traditional local food producers and retailers
Fireworks on the town square for the celebrations of Saint Nicholas, the Lorraine's patron saint
Stade Saint-Symphorien
Georgia Tech Lorraine campus.
The Mettis hybrid bi-articulated bus
The Station Palace in the Imperial District, built 1905-1908 during German rule.
The iconic Protestant church Temple Neuf on the Moselle river

Renowned Messins include poet Paul Verlaine, composer Ambroise Thomas and mathematician Jean-Victor Poncelet; numerous well-known German figures were also born in Metz notably during the annexation periods.

Adolf Schrödter: Falstaff and his page

John Falstaff

Fictional character who appears in three plays by William Shakespeare and is eulogised in a fourth.

Fictional character who appears in three plays by William Shakespeare and is eulogised in a fourth.

Adolf Schrödter: Falstaff and his page
Mistress Page and Falstaff in The Merry Wives of Windsor, staged by Pacific Repertory Theatre at the Golden Bough Playhouse in Carmel, CA, in 1999
An 1829 watercolor by Johann Heinrich Ramberg of Act II, Scene iv: Falstaff enacts the part of the king.
Falstaff with Doll Tearsheet in the Boar's Head tavern, illustration to Act 2, Scene 4 of the play by Eduard von Grützner
Falstaff rebuked, Robert Smirke, c. 1795
Falstaff at Herne's Oak, from "The Merry Wives of Windsor," Act V, Scene v, James Stephanoff, 1832
Eduard von Grützner: Falstaff mit großer Weinkanne und Becher (1896) (Falstaff with big wine jar and cup, 1896)
Falstaff, part of Ronald Gower's Shakespeare memorial in Stratford-upon-Avon
Stephen Kemble, "the best Sir John Falstaff which the British stage ever saw."

Le songe d'une nuit d'été (1850), an opera by Ambroise Thomas in which Shakespeare and Falstaff meet.