Ambroise Thomas

Thomas by Wilhelm Benque, c. 1895
Thomas in 1834 by Jean-Hippolyte Flandrin
Le caïd, 1849
Jean-Baptiste Faure as Hamlet, painted by Manet
Thomas, about 1865
Statue of Thomas in Paris.

French composer and teacher, best known for his operas Mignon (1866) and Hamlet (1868).

- Ambroise Thomas
Thomas by Wilhelm Benque, c. 1895

33 related topics

Alpha

Prologue scene from the premiere production where Virgil and Dante first encounter Francesca and her lover Paolo in Hell

Françoise de Rimini

Opera in four acts with a prologue and an epilogue.

Opera in four acts with a prologue and an epilogue.

Prologue scene from the premiere production where Virgil and Dante first encounter Francesca and her lover Paolo in Hell
Thomas in a January 1896 by Toulouse-Lautrec which shows him seated behind the conductor listening to the rehearsal of a concert where the opera's Prologue was performed.

The last opera composed by Ambroise Thomas, it sets a French libretto by Michel Carré and Jules Barbier which is based on an episode from Dante's Divine Comedy.

Adolf Schrödter: Falstaff and his page

John Falstaff

Fictional character who appears in three plays by William Shakespeare and is eulogised in a fourth.

Fictional character who appears in three plays by William Shakespeare and is eulogised in a fourth.

Adolf Schrödter: Falstaff and his page
Mistress Page and Falstaff in The Merry Wives of Windsor, staged by Pacific Repertory Theatre at the Golden Bough Playhouse in Carmel, CA, in 1999
An 1829 watercolor by Johann Heinrich Ramberg of Act II, Scene iv: Falstaff enacts the part of the king.
Falstaff with Doll Tearsheet in the Boar's Head tavern, illustration to Act 2, Scene 4 of the play by Eduard von Grützner
Falstaff rebuked, Robert Smirke, c. 1795
Falstaff at Herne's Oak, from "The Merry Wives of Windsor," Act V, Scene v, James Stephanoff, 1832
Eduard von Grützner: Falstaff mit großer Weinkanne und Becher (1896) (Falstaff with big wine jar and cup, 1896)
Falstaff, part of Ronald Gower's Shakespeare memorial in Stratford-upon-Avon
Stephen Kemble, "the best Sir John Falstaff which the British stage ever saw."

Le songe d'une nuit d'été (1850), an opera by Ambroise Thomas in which Shakespeare and Falstaff meet.

Clockwise from top: overview of city center (with Cathedral of Saint Stephen), Imperial Quarter, Temple Neuf, Germans' Gate, Opéra-Théâtre (place de la Comédie)

Metz

City in northeast France located at the confluence of the Moselle and the Seille rivers.

City in northeast France located at the confluence of the Moselle and the Seille rivers.

Clockwise from top: overview of city center (with Cathedral of Saint Stephen), Imperial Quarter, Temple Neuf, Germans' Gate, Opéra-Théâtre (place de la Comédie)
Henry II of France entering Metz in 1552, putting an end to the Republic of Metz.
Paul Verlaine by Edmond Aman-Jean, 1892, oil on canvas, Golden Courtyard museums
The city hall on the Place d'Armes.
Street in old city
The Centre Pompidou-Metz, a symbol of modern Metz
The Music Box, a high-quality concert and recording studio venue dedicated to the modern forms of art music, in the Borny District. The venue has been erected in a cité HLM as an urban renewal effort
Water games on the Islands District
The Germans' Gate from the 13th century, one of the last medieval bridge castles found in France. Today, an exhibition hall
Rue Serpenoise, in the main pedestrian area.
Some of the cultural venues in Metz, clockwise from top: the Arsenal, the Golden Courtyard, the Opera House, and the Saint-Jacques square
The Museum of the 1870 War and of the Annexion, the only museum in Europe dedicated to the Franco-Prussian War
The choir of the Saint Stephen's Cathedral with its extensive stained glass windows, including works of Marc Chagall
Basilica of Saint-Pierre-aux-Nonnains, the oldest church in France and cradle of the Gregorian Chant
The Covered Market, home to traditional local food producers and retailers
Fireworks on the town square for the celebrations of Saint Nicholas, the Lorraine's patron saint
Stade Saint-Symphorien
Georgia Tech Lorraine campus.
The Mettis hybrid bi-articulated bus
The Station Palace in the Imperial District, built 1905-1908 during German rule.
The iconic Protestant church Temple Neuf on the Moselle river

Renowned Messins include poet Paul Verlaine, composer Ambroise Thomas and mathematician Jean-Victor Poncelet; numerous well-known German figures were also born in Metz notably during the annexation periods.

Mary Garden

Mary Garden

Scottish-born American operatic soprano with a substantial career in France and America in the first third of the 20th century.

Scottish-born American operatic soprano with a substantial career in France and America in the first third of the 20th century.

Mary Garden
Mary Garden, 1908
Mary Garden as Mélisande in Debussy's Pelléas et Mélisande
Mary Garden in the opera Thaïs
Mary Garden as Natoma
Mary Garden as Cleopatra from Massenet's Cléopâtre (1921)
(1887–1945) and Mary Garden in 1918
Mary Garden featured on an advertisement for the autopiano, 1910s
Mary Garden in 1954

She sang there for one season, notably portraying Ophelia in Ambroise Thomas's Hamlet (1908) and the title part in Henry Février's Monna Vanna (1909) among other roles.

Battistini in the 1910s

Mattia Battistini

Italian operatic baritone.

Italian operatic baritone.

Battistini in the 1910s
Battistini in the 1910s
Battistini contemplates Yorick's skull as Ambroise Thomas's Hamlet. Photographed in 1911.

Mattia Battistini: a recital of arias by Mozart, Flotow, Donizetti, Gounod, Verdi, Ambroise Thomas, Preiser—Lebendige Vergangenheit (Austria).

Galli-Marié was the original Carmen; photo by Atelier Nadar

Célestine Galli-Marié

French mezzo-soprano who is most famous for creating the title role in the opera Carmen.

French mezzo-soprano who is most famous for creating the title role in the opera Carmen.

Galli-Marié was the original Carmen; photo by Atelier Nadar
Galli-Marié premiered the rôle of Mignon in 1866.
Célestine Galli-Marié in Carmen, by Henri Lucien Doucet (1884), musée de Marseille, Marseilles

Her most famous roles were in Thomas's Mignon (1866) and Bizet's Carmen (1875).

Le Joaillier de Saint-James at the l'Opéra-Comique, L'Illustration, 17 February 1862

Adolphe de Leuven

French theatre director and a librettist.

French theatre director and a librettist.

Le Joaillier de Saint-James at the l'Opéra-Comique, L'Illustration, 17 February 1862

He produced over 170 plays and librettos, with operatic settings by Adam including Le postillon de Lonjumeau, Clapisson, Félicien David (Le Saphir) and Thomas.

List of operas by Ambroise Thomas

This is a list of the complete operas of the French opera composer Ambroise Thomas (1811–1896).

Gaston Serpette

Gaston Serpette

French composer, best known for his operettas.

French composer, best known for his operettas.

Gaston Serpette
Serpette: a 1904 press photograph

In 1868 he entered the composition class of Ambroise Thomas at the Paris Conservatoire, and in 1871 won France's top musical prize, the Prix de Rome, previously won by Berlioz, Thomas, Gounod, Bizet and Massenet, among others.

Auguste Barbereau

French composer and music theorist.

French composer and music theorist.

Among his disciples are Ambroise Thomas, Ernest Guiraud, and Charles Delioux.