American Basketball Association

ABAAmerican Basketball Association (ABA)1969–70 ABA season1970 ABA DraftABA ChampionshipsABA Draftsrival leaguethe ABA
The original American Basketball Association (ABA) was a men's professional basketball league, from 1967 to 1976.wikipedia
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ABA–NBA merger

mergedboth leagues mergedmerger
The ABA ceased to exist with the American Basketball Association–National Basketball Association merger in 1976, leading to several teams joining the National Basketball Association and to the introduction of the 3-point shot in the NBA.
The merger of the American Basketball Association (ABA) with the National Basketball Association (NBA), after multiple attempts over several years, occurred in 1976.

Major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada

major leaguemajor professional sports leaguemajor professional sports leagues
The ABA was conceived at a time stretching from 1960 through the mid-1970s when numerous upstart leagues were challenging, with varying degrees of success, the established major professional sports leagues in the United States.
Four teams from the rival American Basketball Association joined the NBA with the ABA–NBA merger in 1976.

Earl Strom

The ABA also went after four of the best referees in the NBA: Earl Strom, John Vanak, Norm Drucker and Joe Gushue, getting them to "jump" leagues by offering them far more in money and benefits.
Earl "Yogi" Strom (December 15, 1927 – July 10, 1994) was an American professional basketball referee for 29 years in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and for three years in the American Basketball Association (ABA).

Carolina Cougars

CougarsCarolinaThe Carolina Cougars
The ABA also had several "regional" franchises, such as the Virginia Squires and Carolina Cougars, that played "home" games in several cities.
The Carolina Cougars were a basketball franchise in the former American Basketball Association that existed from late 1969 through 1974.

John Vanak

The ABA also went after four of the best referees in the NBA: Earl Strom, John Vanak, Norm Drucker and Joe Gushue, getting them to "jump" leagues by offering them far more in money and benefits.
John Joseph Vanak (1933-November 26, 2016) was a referee in the American Basketball Association and the National Basketball Association.

National Basketball Association

NBABasketball Association of AmericaNational Basketball Association (NBA)
The ABA ceased to exist with the American Basketball Association–National Basketball Association merger in 1976, leading to several teams joining the National Basketball Association and to the introduction of the 3-point shot in the NBA.
In 1967, the league faced a new external threat with the formation of the American Basketball Association (ABA).

Joe Gushue

The ABA also went after four of the best referees in the NBA: Earl Strom, John Vanak, Norm Drucker and Joe Gushue, getting them to "jump" leagues by offering them far more in money and benefits.
Joseph J. "Joe" Gushue was a highly respected referee in the American Basketball Association and the National Basketball Association (NBA).

Indiana Pacers

IndianaPacersIndiana Pacer
Four ABA teams were absorbed into the older league: the New York Nets, Denver Nuggets, Indiana Pacers, and San Antonio Spurs.
The Pacers were first established in 1967 as a member of the American Basketball Association (ABA) and became a member of the NBA in 1976 as a result of the ABA–NBA merger.

San Antonio Spurs

San AntonioSpursDallas/Texas Chaparrals
Four ABA teams were absorbed into the older league: the New York Nets, Denver Nuggets, Indiana Pacers, and San Antonio Spurs.
The Spurs are one of four former American Basketball Association (ABA) teams to remain intact in the NBA after the 1976 ABA–NBA merger and the only former ABA team to have won an NBA championship.

Julius Erving

Julius "Dr. J" ErvingDr. JJulius "Doctor J" Erving
The Nets had to settle for an arena in Piscataway, New Jersey and, to meet expenses, were forced to sell the contract of star Julius Erving to the Philadelphia 76ers. The dunk contest was held at halftime of the All-Star game and the contestants were Artis Gilmore, George Gervin, David Thompson, Larry Kenon, and Julius Erving.
Erving helped legitimize the American Basketball Association (ABA) and was the best-known player in that league when it merged with the National Basketball Association (NBA) after the 1975–76 season.

Kentucky Colonels

ColonelsKentuckyKentucky (basketball, defunct)
Two other clubs, the Kentucky Colonels and the Spirits of St. Louis, were disbanded upon the merger, with each getting a buyout: the Colonels received a one-time buyout that owner John Y. Brown, Jr. used to purchase the NBA's Buffalo Braves, while the Spirits owners negotiated a cut of the other ABA teams' television revenues in perpetuity.
The Kentucky Colonels were a member of the American Basketball Association for all of the league's nine years.

1976 NBA draft

19761976 draftABA Dispersal Draft
As part of the merger agreement, the four teams were not permitted to participate in the 1976 NBA Draft.
The 76ers, the Golden State Warriors and the Buffalo Braves also forfeited their second, third and fourth-round picks respectively due to their participation in 1975 supplementary draft American Basketball Association (ABA) players who had never been drafted in the NBA.

Spirits of St. Louis

St Louis SpiritsSt. Louis Spirits
Two other clubs, the Kentucky Colonels and the Spirits of St. Louis, were disbanded upon the merger, with each getting a buyout: the Colonels received a one-time buyout that owner John Y. Brown, Jr. used to purchase the NBA's Buffalo Braves, while the Spirits owners negotiated a cut of the other ABA teams' television revenues in perpetuity.
The Spirits of St. Louis were one of two teams still in existence at the end of the American Basketball Association (ABA) that did not survive the ABA–NBA merger.

Basketball

basketball playerhigh school basketballmen's basketball
The original American Basketball Association (ABA) was a men's professional basketball league, from 1967 to 1976.
An upstart organization, the American Basketball Association, emerged in 1967 and briefly threatened the NBA's dominance until the ABA-NBA merger in 1976.

Three-point field goal

three-pointersthree-pointthree-pointer
The ABA ceased to exist with the American Basketball Association–National Basketball Association merger in 1976, leading to several teams joining the National Basketball Association and to the introduction of the 3-point shot in the NBA. The ABA distinguished itself from its older counterpart with a more wide-open, flashy style of offensive play, as well as differences in rules—a 30-second shot clock (as opposed to the NBA's 24-second clock, though the ABA did switch to the 24 second shot clock for the 1975–76 season) and use of a three-point field goal arc, pioneered in the earlier ABL.
The three-point shot later became popularized by the American Basketball Association (ABA), introduced in its inaugural 1967–68 season.

John Y. Brown Jr.

John Y. BrownJohn BrownJohn Y. Brown, Jr.
Two other clubs, the Kentucky Colonels and the Spirits of St. Louis, were disbanded upon the merger, with each getting a buyout: the Colonels received a one-time buyout that owner John Y. Brown, Jr. used to purchase the NBA's Buffalo Braves, while the Spirits owners negotiated a cut of the other ABA teams' television revenues in perpetuity.
During the 1970s, he also owned, at various times, three professional basketball teams – the American Basketball Association's Kentucky Colonels, and the National Basketball Association's Boston Celtics and Buffalo Braves (currently the Los Angeles Clippers).

Virginia Squires

Washington CapitalsWashington CapsOakland Oaks
The seventh remaining team, the Virginia Squires, received nothing, as they had ceased operations shortly before the merger.
They were members of the American Basketball Association from 1970 to 1976.

Philadelphia 76ers

Philadelphia76ersSyracuse
The Nets had to settle for an arena in Piscataway, New Jersey and, to meet expenses, were forced to sell the contract of star Julius Erving to the Philadelphia 76ers.
Chamberlain was making noises about jumping to the American Basketball Association, and general manager Jack Ramsay did not want to risk letting Chamberlain walk away for nothing.

Mike Storen

Mike Storen 1973–74
Mike Storen is an American sports executive, perhaps best known for his tenure as commissioner of the American Basketball Association.

Norm Drucker

The ABA also went after four of the best referees in the NBA: Earl Strom, John Vanak, Norm Drucker and Joe Gushue, getting them to "jump" leagues by offering them far more in money and benefits.
In 1969, when the two-year-old American Basketball Association was raiding the NBA for talent, he took the risk, along with three other NBA "lead" referees — Joe Gushue, Earl Strom and John Vanak — and jumped to the financially uncertain ABA.

Shot clock

30-second shooting clockshot-clock24-second clock
The ABA distinguished itself from its older counterpart with a more wide-open, flashy style of offensive play, as well as differences in rules—a 30-second shot clock (as opposed to the NBA's 24-second clock, though the ABA did switch to the 24 second shot clock for the 1975–76 season) and use of a three-point field goal arc, pioneered in the earlier ABL.
The American Basketball Association also adopted a 30-second clock when it launched in 1967–68, switching to the NBA's 24-second length for its final season (1975–76).

George Mikan

George "Mr. Basketball" Mikan
George Mikan 1967–1969
After his playing career, Mikan became one of the founders of the American Basketball Association (ABA), serving as commissioner of the league.

George McGinnis

McGinnis
While the NBA and NCAA initially contested the rule, after the courts ruled in favor of Haywood playing in the ABA, the NBA followed suit and relaxed the four year rule to allow for players to enter the league if they qualified as a hardship on the basis of “financial condition…family, [or] academic record.” Haywood paved the way for other players to enter the ABA before they had completed their collegiate careers such as George McGinnis and Julius Erving.
George F. McGinnis (born August 12, 1950) is an American retired professional basketball player who played 11 seasons in the American Basketball Association (ABA) and National Basketball Association (NBA).

Artis Gilmore

The dunk contest was held at halftime of the All-Star game and the contestants were Artis Gilmore, George Gervin, David Thompson, Larry Kenon, and Julius Erving.
Artis Gilmore (born September 21, 1949) is an American retired basketball player who played in the American Basketball Association (ABA) and National Basketball Association (NBA).

George Gervin

George "The Iceman" Gervin
The dunk contest was held at halftime of the All-Star game and the contestants were Artis Gilmore, George Gervin, David Thompson, Larry Kenon, and Julius Erving.
George Gervin (born April 27, 1952), nicknamed "The Iceman", is an American retired professional basketball player who played in both the American Basketball Association (ABA) and National Basketball Association (NBA) for the Virginia Squires, San Antonio Spurs, and Chicago Bulls.