Clockwise from top: Battle of Gettysburg

Union Captain John Tidball's artillery

Confederate prisoners

ironclad USS Atlanta (1861)

Ruins of Richmond, Virginia

Battle of Franklin
The "Dictator" siege mortar at Petersburg. In the foreground, the figure on the right is Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, chief of artillery of the Army of the Potomac.
Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe, aroused public opinion about the evils of slavery. According to legend, when Lincoln was introduced to her at the White House, his first words were, "So this is the little lady who started this Great War."
Fredericksburg, Virginia; May 1863. Soldiers in the trenches. Trench warfare would appear again more infamously in World War I
Frederick Douglass, a former slave, was a leading abolitionist
A portion of the 4th USCT Infantry
Marais des Cygnes massacre of anti-slavery Kansans, May 19, 1858
Siege of Petersburg, assaults on June 15–18
Mathew Brady, Portrait of Abraham Lincoln, 1860
Siege of Petersburg, movements against the railroads and A.P. Hill's counterattack, June 21–22
The first published imprint of secession, a broadside issued by the Charleston Mercury, December 20, 1860
Wilson–Kautz Raid, June 22 – July 1
Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America (1861–1865)
"Dictator" siege mortar on the U.S. Military Railroad at Petersburg
Bombardment of the Fort by the Confederates
First Battle of Deep Bottom, July 27–29
Rioters attacking a building during the New York anti-draft riots of 1863
Siege of Petersburg, Battle of the Crater, July 30
Clashes on the rivers were melees of ironclads, cottonclads, gunboats and rams, complicated by naval mines and fire rafts.
Sketch of the explosion seen from the Union line.
Battle between the USS Monitor and USS Merrimack (1855)
Second Battle of Deep Bottom, August 14–20
General Scott's "Anaconda Plan" 1861. Tightening naval blockade, forcing rebels out of Missouri along the Mississippi River, Kentucky Unionists sit on the fence, idled cotton industry illustrated in Georgia.
Siege of Petersburg, capture of the Weldon Railroad, August 18–19
Gunline of nine Union ironclads. South Atlantic Blockading Squadron off Charleston. Continuous blockade of all major ports was sustained by North's overwhelming war production.
Siege of Petersburg, actions on October 27
A December 1861 cartoon in Punch magazine in London ridicules American aggressiveness in the Trent Affair. John Bull, at right, warns Uncle Sam, "You do what's right, my son, or I'll blow you out of the water."
Siege of Petersburg, actions preceding Five Forks
County map of Civil War battles by theater and year
Grant's final assaults and Lee's retreat (start of the Appomattox Campaign)
Robert E. Lee
<center>Lt. Gen.
"Stonewall" Jackson got his nickname at Bull Run.
<center>Maj. Gen.
George B. McClellan
<center>Maj. Gen.
The Battle of Antietam, the Civil War's deadliest one-day fight.
<center>Gen.
Confederate dead overrun at Marye's Heights, reoccupied next day May 4, 1863
<center>Gen.
Pickett's Charge
<center>Lt. Gen.
Ulysses S. Grant
<center>Lt. Gen.
Albert Sidney Johnston died at Shiloh
<center>Lt. Gen.
By 1863, the Union controlled large portions of the Western Theater, especially areas surrounding the Mississippi River
<center>Lt. Gen.
The Battle of Chickamauga, the highest two-day losses
<center>Brig. Gen. James H. Wilson</center>
Nathaniel Lyon secured St. Louis docks and arsenal, led Union forces to expel Missouri Confederate forces and government.
<center>Brig. Gen. August Kautz</center>
New Orleans captured
Fascine Trench Breastworks, Petersburg, Va. – NARA – 524792. Although identified as Confederate Trenches this is actually Union Fort Sedgwick aka "Fort Hell" which was opposite Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damnation"<ref>Civil War talk Forum</ref>
William Tecumseh Sherman
Union Army 9th Corps attacking Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damanation" sketch by Alfred Ward.
These dead soldiers—from Ewell's May 1864 attack at Spotsylvania—delayed Grant's advance on Richmond in the Overland Campaign.
Confederate artilleryman killed during the final Union assault against the trenches at Petersburg. Photo by Thomas C. Roche, April 3, 1865.<ref>Frassanito, p. 360.</ref><ref>See website Petersburg Project on location of Many of the Roche photographs at Petersburg April 1865</ref> Although prints of this picture list it as being taken at Ft Mahone, historians at the "Petersburg Project" believe it was taken at Confederate Battery 25<ref>Dead Artilleryman comments Petersburg Project</ref>
Philip Sheridan
Smoke is still rising from the ruins of Richmond, Virginia after surrendering on April 3, 1865 following the Union victory at the siege of Petersburg. Union cavalry mounts with carbines visible are hitched in the foreground.
Map of Confederate territory losses year by year
Richmond–Petersburg Theater, fall 1864
Confederate
Union
Burying Union dead on the Antietam battlefield, 1862
Through the supervision of the Freedmen's Bureau, northern teachers traveled into the South to provide education and training for the newly freed population.
Beginning in 1961 the U.S. Post Office released commemorative stamps for five famous battles, each issued on the 100th anniversary of the respective battle.
The Battle of Fort Sumter, as depicted by Currier and Ives.
Slave states that seceded before April 15, 1861 Slave states that seceded after April 15, 1861 Union states that permitted slavery (border states) Union states that banned slavery
Territories
US Secession map. The Union vs. the Confederacy.
Union states
Union territories not permitting slavery
Border Union states, permitting slavery (One of these states, West Virginia was created in 1863)
Confederate states
Union territories that permitted slavery (claimed by Confederacy) at the start of the war, but where slavery was outlawed by the U.S. in 1862
The Battle of Antietam, the Civil War's deadliest one-day fight.
Abolition of slavery in the various states of the United States over time:Abolition of slavery during or shortly after the American Revolution
The Northwest Ordinance, 1787
Gradual emancipation in New York (starting 1799, completed 1827) and New Jersey (starting 1804, completed by Thirteenth Amendment, 1865)
The Missouri Compromise, 1821
Effective abolition of slavery by Mexican or joint US/British authority
Abolition of slavery by Congressional action, 1861
Abolition of slavery by Congressional action, 1862
Emancipation Proclamation as originally issued, January 1, 1863
Subsequent operation of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863
Abolition of slavery by state action during the Civil War
Operation of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1864
Operation of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1865
Thirteenth Amendment to the US constitution, December 18, 1865
Territory incorporated into the US after the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment
Oath to defend the Constitution of the United States and, among other promises, to "abide by and faithfully support all acts of Congress passed during the . . . rebellion having reference to slaves . . . ," signed by former Confederate officer Samuel M. Kennard on June 27, 1865

The Richmond–Petersburg campaign was a series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 9, 1864, to March 25, 1865, during the American Civil War.

- Siege of Petersburg

The last significant battles raged around the ten-month Siege of Petersburg, gateway to the Confederate capital of Richmond.

- American Civil War
Clockwise from top: Battle of Gettysburg

Union Captain John Tidball's artillery

Confederate prisoners

ironclad USS Atlanta (1861)

Ruins of Richmond, Virginia

Battle of Franklin

22 related topics with Alpha

Overall

USCT recruiting poster

United States Colored Troops

0 links

The United States Colored Troops (USCT) were regiments in the United States Army composed primarily of African-American (colored) soldiers, although members of other minority groups also served within the units.

The United States Colored Troops (USCT) were regiments in the United States Army composed primarily of African-American (colored) soldiers, although members of other minority groups also served within the units.

USCT recruiting poster
USCT soldiers at an abandoned farmhouse in Dutch Gap, Virginia, 1864
Colored Troops singing "John Brown's Body" as they marched into Charleston, South Carolina, in February 1865. Note the attitude of the local population, and the white officers.
Union soldier in uniform with family; he has been identified as Sgt. Samuel Smith of the 119th USCT
250x250px
Escaped slave, Gordon (also called "Whipped Peter"), in USCT uniform
Captain Francis Jackson Meriam, 3rd South Carolina Colored Infantry
U.S. Colored Troops medal issued by General Benjamin Butler
African-American corporal (United States Colored Troops)outside 8 Whitehall Street, Atlanta, a slave auction house; Fall 1864
Printed broadside, calling all men of color to arms, 1863
Sgt Major Christian Fleetwood. Civil War, Medal of Honor recipient
3rd US Colored Troops banner {obverse}
22th US Colored Troops banner
24th US Colored Troops banner
26th US Colored Troops banner
27th US Colored Troops banner
45th US Colored Troops banner
Harriet Tubman with family and ex-slaves; sitting at left is Tubmans 2nd husband Nelson Davis (8th USCT veteran)

They were first recruited during the American Civil War, and by the end of the war in 1865, the 175 USCT regiments constituted about one-tenth of the manpower of the Union Army.

The most famous USCT action took place at the Battle of the Crater during the Siege of Petersburg.

XXV Corps badge

XXV Corps (Union Army)

0 links

XXV Corps badge
Union Army 1st Division Badge, XXV Corps
Union Army 2nd Division Badge, XXV Corps
Union Army 3rd Division Badge, XXV Corps

XXV Corps was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War.

The new XXV Corps served with distinction during the waning days of the Petersburg Campaign.