American Dialect Society

The American Dialect Society (ADS), founded in 1889, is a learned society "dedicated to the study of the English language in North America, and of other languages, or dialects of other languages, influencing it or influenced by it." The Society publishes the academic journal, American Speech.wikipedia
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American Speech

The Society publishes the academic journal, American Speech.
American Speech is a quarterly academic journal of the American Dialect Society, established in 1925 and published by Duke University Press.

Word of the year

Word of the Twentieth Centurywords of the yearOxford Dictionaries' Word of the Year
Since 1991, the American Dialect Society has designated one or more words or terms to be the word of the year.
The American Dialect Society's Word of the Year is the oldest English-language version, and the only one that is announced after the end of the calendar year, determined by a vote of independent linguists, and not tied to commercial interest.

Jazz (word)

jazzJassjazz band
In addition, the ADS has chosen its "Word of the 1990s" ('web'), "Word of the 20th Century" ('jazz'), and "Word of the Past Millennium" ('she').
The word's intrinsic interest – the American Dialect Society named it the Word of the Twentieth Century – has resulted in considerable research and its history is well documented.

She (pronoun)

shefemale pronounsher
In addition, the ADS has chosen its "Word of the 1990s" ('web'), "Word of the 20th Century" ('jazz'), and "Word of the Past Millennium" ('she').
In 1999, the American Dialect Society chose she as the word of the past millennium.

Dictionary of American Regional English

The organization was founded as part of an effort to create a comprehensive American dialect dictionary, a near century-long undertaking that culminated in the publication of the Dictionary of American Regional English.
In 1889, when Joseph Wright began editing the English Dialect Dictionary, a group of American philologists founded the American Dialect Society with the ultimate purpose of producing a similar work for the United States.

Lists of Merriam-Webster's Words of the Year

Merriam-Webster's Words of the Year
A number of words chosen by the ADS are also on the lists of Merriam-Webster's Words of the Year.
Hurricane Katrina, the bird flu, and the death of Pope John Paul II renewed public interest in words such as refugee, tsunami, pandemic, conclave, and levee. The word refugee was also a candidate for the American Dialect Society's Word of the Year; according to Morse, the term gained notoriety as the entire country debated with how to describe people affected by Hurricane Katrina.

Snowclone

mother of allcatchphraseidiomatic expression
The American Dialect Society declared "the mother of all" the 1991 Word of the Year.

Truthiness

bemoaning the failure
Truthiness was named Word of the Year for 2005 by the American Dialect Society and for 2006 by Merriam-Webster.

Soccer mom

soccer momshockey momhockey dad
Soccer moms received so much attention during the election that the American Dialect Society voted soccer mom Word of the Year for 1996.

Weapon of mass destruction

weapons of mass destructionWMDNBC
Because of its prolific use and (worldwide) public profile during this period, the American Dialect Society voted "weapons of mass destruction" (and its abbreviation, "WMD") the word of the year in 2002, and in 2003 Lake Superior State University added WMD to its list of terms banished for "Mis-use, Over-use and General Uselessness" (and "as a card that trumps all forms of aggression").

... Not!

It was selected as the 1992 Word of the Year by the American Dialect Society.

Black Lives Matter

#BlackLivesMatterBlack Lives Matter movement#BlackLivesMatter movement
In 2014, the American Dialect Society chose #BlackLivesMatter as their word of the year.

Hashtag

hashtags#hash tag
The first published use of the term "hash tag" was in a blog post by Stowe Boyd, "Hash Tags = Twitter Groupings," on August 26, 2007, according to lexicographer Ben Zimmer, chair of the American Dialect Society's New Words Committee.

The Colbert Report

Colbert ReportColbert NationColbert Universe
Truthiness was named Word of the Year for 2005 by the American Dialect Society and for 2006 by Merriam-Webster.

Singular they

singular ''theytheythey/them
The singular they in the meaning "gender-neutral singular pronoun for a known person, as a non-binary identifier" was chosen by the American Dialect Society as the Word of the Year 2015.

Grant Barrett

He is also the vice president of communications and technology for the American Dialect Society, a former member of the editorial review board for the academic journal American Speech, former editor of the journal's "Among the New Words" column, and a founder of the online dictionary Wordnik.

Occupy movement

OccupyOccupy Wall Street movementoccupation
In January 2012, members of the American Dialect Society voted with an overwhelming majority for "Occupy" as the word of the year for 2011.

Learned society

learned societiesscientific societysociety
The American Dialect Society (ADS), founded in 1889, is a learned society "dedicated to the study of the English language in North America, and of other languages, or dialects of other languages, influencing it or influenced by it."

Language

languageslinguisticlinguistic diversity
The American Dialect Society (ADS), founded in 1889, is a learned society "dedicated to the study of the English language in North America, and of other languages, or dialects of other languages, influencing it or influenced by it."

Dialect

dialect clusterdialectslanguage cluster
The American Dialect Society (ADS), founded in 1889, is a learned society "dedicated to the study of the English language in North America, and of other languages, or dialects of other languages, influencing it or influenced by it."

Joseph Wright (linguist)

Joseph WrightWright, JosephProfessor Joseph Wright
In 1889, when Joseph Wright began editing the English Dialect Dictionary, a group of American philologists founded the American Dialect Society with the ultimate purpose of producing a similar work for the United States.

The English Dialect Dictionary

English Dialect Dictionary
In 1889, when Joseph Wright began editing the English Dialect Dictionary, a group of American philologists founded the American Dialect Society with the ultimate purpose of producing a similar work for the United States.

Frederic G. Cassidy

Frederic Cassidy
Members of the Society began to collect material, much of which was published in the Society's journal Dialect Notes, but little was done toward compiling a dictionary recording nationwide usage until Frederic G. Cassidy was appointed Chief Editor in 1963.

American English

EnglishAmericanEnglish-language
Its activities include a mailing list, which deals chiefly with American English but also carries some discussion of other issues of linguistic interest.

The New York Times

New York TimesNY TimesTimes
The New York Times stated that the American Dialect Society "probably started" the "word-of-the-year ritual".