American and British English spelling differences

spelling differencesorsee spelling differencesalso spelledAmerican EnglishBritish spellinginternational spellingBritish EnglishAmerican spellingBritish spellings
[[File:Defence Defense Labour Labor British American spelling by country.svg|400px|thumb|British and American spellings around the world:wikipedia
698 Related Articles

English-language spelling reform

English spelling reformEnglishEnglish language spelling reform
However, English-language spelling reform has rarely been adopted otherwise, and so modern English orthography varies somewhat between countries and is far from phonemic in any country.
Many of the spellings preferred by Noah Webster have become standard in the United States, but have not been adopted elsewhere (see American and British English spelling differences).

English orthography

English spellingspellingb'''ir'''d
However, English-language spelling reform has rarely been adopted otherwise, and so modern English orthography varies somewhat between countries and is far from phonemic in any country.
Despite the various English dialects spoken from country to country and within different regions of the same country, there are only slight regional variations in English orthography, the two most recognised variations being British and American spelling, and its overall uniformity helps facilitate international communication.

Humour

humorhumoroussense of humor
Humour (British English), also spelt as humor (American English; see spelling differences), is the tendency of experiences to provoke laughter and provide amusement.

Armour

armorarmoredArmoured
The word armour was once somewhat common in American usage but has disappeared except in some brand names such as Under Armour.
Armour (British English) or armor (American English; see spelling differences) is a protective covering that is used to prevent damage from being inflicted to an object, individual or vehicle by direct contact weapons or projectiles, usually during combat, or from damage caused by a potentially dangerous environment or activity (e.g., cycling, construction sites, etc.).

Rigour

rigorrigorousmathematical rigour
As a general noun, rigour has a u in the UK; the medical term rigor (sometimes ) does not, such as in rigor mortis, which is Latin.
Rigour (British English) or rigor (American English; see spelling differences) describes a condition of stiffness or strictness.

Spelling

misspellingspellmisspelled
Many of the differences between American and British English date back to a time when spelling standards had not yet developed.
English-language spelling reform proposals have been regularly made since the 16th century, but have made little impact apart from a few spellings preferred by Noah Webster having contributed to American and British English spelling differences.

Metre

metermmetres
One outcome is the British distinction of meter for a measuring instrument from metre for the unit of length.
The metre (Commonwealth spelling and BIPM spelling ) or meter (American spelling ) (from the French unit mètre, from the Greek noun μέτρον, "measure") is the base unit of length in the International System of Units (SI).

Spelling reform

orthographic reformsimplified spellingreform the spelling
Webster's efforts at spelling reform were somewhat effective in his native country, resulting in certain well-known patterns of spelling differences between the American and British varieties of English.
Some of his suggestions resulted in the differences between American and British spelling.

Anemia

anaemiaanemicanaemic
Examples (with non-American letter in bold): aeon, anaemia, anaesthesia, caecum, caesium, coeliac, diarrhoea, encyclopaedia, faeces, foetal, gynaecology, haemoglobin, haemophilia, leukaemia, oesophagus, oestrogen, orthopaedic, palaeontology, paediatric, paedophile.
Anemia (also spelled anaemia) is a decrease in the total amount of red blood cells (RBCs) or hemoglobin in the blood, or a lowered ability of the blood to carry oxygen.

Caesium

cesiumCsCs +
Examples (with non-American letter in bold): aeon, anaemia, anaesthesia, caecum, caesium, coeliac, diarrhoea, encyclopaedia, faeces, foetal, gynaecology, haemoglobin, haemophilia, leukaemia, oesophagus, oestrogen, orthopaedic, palaeontology, paediatric, paedophile.
Caesium (IUPAC spelling ) (also spelled cesium in American English) is a chemical element with the symbol Cs and atomic number 55.

Feces

faecesdungexcrement
Examples (with non-American letter in bold): aeon, anaemia, anaesthesia, caecum, caesium, coeliac, diarrhoea, encyclopaedia, faeces, foetal, gynaecology, haemoglobin, haemophilia, leukaemia, oesophagus, oestrogen, orthopaedic, palaeontology, paediatric, paedophile.
Feces (or faeces) are the solid or semisolid remains of food that could not be digested in the small intestine.

Fetus

fetalfoetusfetuses
Examples (with non-American letter in bold): aeon, anaemia, anaesthesia, caecum, caesium, coeliac, diarrhoea, encyclopaedia, faeces, foetal, gynaecology, haemoglobin, haemophilia, leukaemia, oesophagus, oestrogen, orthopaedic, palaeontology, paediatric, paedophile.
A fetus or foetus (plural fetuses, feti, foetuses, or foeti) is the unborn offspring of an animal that develops from an embryo.

Esophagus

oesophagusesophageallower esophageal sphincter
Examples (with non-American letter in bold): aeon, anaemia, anaesthesia, caecum, caesium, coeliac, diarrhoea, encyclopaedia, faeces, foetal, gynaecology, haemoglobin, haemophilia, leukaemia, oesophagus, oestrogen, orthopaedic, palaeontology, paediatric, paedophile.
The esophagus (American English) or oesophagus (British English; see spelling differences), commonly known as the food pipe or gullet, is an organ in vertebrates through which food passes, aided by peristaltic contractions, from the pharynx to the stomach.

Pedophilia

pedophilepaedophilepaedophilia
Examples (with non-American letter in bold): aeon, anaemia, anaesthesia, caecum, caesium, coeliac, diarrhoea, encyclopaedia, faeces, foetal, gynaecology, haemoglobin, haemophilia, leukaemia, oesophagus, oestrogen, orthopaedic, palaeontology, paediatric, paedophile.
Pedophilia (alternatively spelt paedophilia) is a psychiatric disorder in which an adult or older adolescent experiences a primary or exclusive sexual attraction to prepubescent children.

Oxford spelling

Oxford EnglishIzeOxford Dictionary
The minority British English usage of -ize is known as Oxford spelling and is used in publications of the Oxford University Press, most notably the Oxford English Dictionary, and of other academic publishers.
Oxford spelling (also Oxford English Dictionary spelling, Oxford style, or Oxford English spelling) is a spelling standard that prescribes the use of British spelling in combination with the suffix -ize in words like realize and organization, in contrast to the predominant use of -ise endings in current British English.

Encyclopedia

encyclopaediaencyclopedistencyclopedic
Examples (with non-American letter in bold): aeon, anaemia, anaesthesia, caecum, caesium, coeliac, diarrhoea, encyclopaedia, faeces, foetal, gynaecology, haemoglobin, haemophilia, leukaemia, oesophagus, oestrogen, orthopaedic, palaeontology, paediatric, paedophile.
Today in English, the word is most commonly spelled encyclopedia, though encyclopaedia (from encyclopædia) is also used in Britain.

Noah Webster

WebsterNoah Webster, Jr.American Spelling Book
A "British standard" began to emerge following the 1755 publication of Samuel Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language, and an "American standard" started following the work of Noah Webster and in particular his An American Dictionary of the English Language, first published in 1828.
In A Companion to the American Revolution (2008), John Algeo notes: "It is often assumed that characteristically American spellings were invented by Noah Webster. He was very influential in popularizing certain spellings in America, but he did not originate them. Rather ... he chose already existing options such as center, color and check on such grounds as simplicity, analogy or etymology."

Lemmatisation

lemmatizationlemmatizedlemmatiser
His dictionary of 1755 lemmatizes distil and instill, downhil and uphill.
Lemmatisation ([[American and British English spelling differences#-ise.2C_-ize_.28-isation.2C_-ization.29|or]] lemmatization) in linguistics is the process of grouping together the inflected forms of a word so they can be analysed as a single item, identified by the word's lemma, or dictionary form.

OECD

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and DevelopmentOrganisation for European Economic Co-operationOrganisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)
Worldwide, -ize endings prevail in scientific writing and are commonly used by many international organizations, such as the United Nations Organizations (such as the World Health Organization and the International Civil Aviation Organization) and the International Organization for Standardization (but not by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development).
Unlike the organisations of the United Nations system, OECD uses the spelling "organisation" with an "s" in its name rather than "organization" (see -ise/-ize).

Dictionary

dictionariesonline dictionaryList of English dictionaries
These differences became noticeable after the publishing of influential dictionaries.
(Similarly, British English subsequently underwent a few spelling changes that did not affect American English; see further at American and British English spelling differences.)

Æ

ashæscÆæ
The ligatures æ and œ were introduced when the sounds became monophthongs, and later applied to words not of Greek origin, in both Latin (for example, cœli) and French (for example, œuvre).
In the United States, the issue of the ligature is sidestepped in many cases by use of a simplified spelling with "e", as happened with œ as well.

British English

BritishEnglishUK
Today's British English spellings mostly follow Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language (1755), while many American English spellings follow Webster's An American Dictionary of the English Language ("ADEL", "Webster's Dictionary", 1828).

American English

EnglishAmericanEnglish-language
Today's British English spellings mostly follow Johnson's A Dictionary of the English Language (1755), while many American English spellings follow Webster's An American Dictionary of the English Language ("ADEL", "Webster's Dictionary", 1828).

Australian English

EnglishAustralianAustralia
Australian spelling has also strayed slightly from British spelling, with some American spellings incorporated as standard.
Australian spelling is closer to British than American spelling.

Hiberno-English

Irish EnglishIrishIrish accent
Hiberno-English's spelling and pronunciation standards align with British rather than American English.