American civil religion

civil religion
American civil religion is a sociological theory that a nonsectarian quasi-religious faith exists within the United States with sacred symbols drawn from national history.wikipedia
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Secular religion

political religionquasi-religionquasi-religious
There is a viewpoint that some Americans have come to see the document of the United States Constitution, along with the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights as cornerstones of a type of civic or civil religion or political religion.
Totalitarian societies are perhaps more prone to political religion, but various scholars have described features of political religion even in democracies, for instance American civil religion as described by Robert Bellah in 1967.

Sociology of religion

sociologist of religionsociologists of religionreligion
The topic soon became the major focus at religious sociology conferences and numerous articles and books were written on the subject.
American civil religion, for example, might be said to have its own set of sacred "things": the flag of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., etc. Other sociologists have taken Durkheim's concept of what religion is in the direction of the religion of professional sports, the military, or of rock music.

Robert N. Bellah

Robert Bellah,
The concept goes back to the 19th century, but in current form, the theory was developed by sociologist Robert Bellah in 1967 in his article, "Civil Religion in America".
Bellah was perhaps best known for his work related to American civil religion, a term which he coined in a 1967 article that has since gained widespread attention among scholars.

Civil religion

civic religioncivil ceremony
There is a viewpoint that some Americans have come to see the document of the United States Constitution, along with the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights as cornerstones of a type of civic or civil religion or political religion.
Albanese argues that the American Revolution was the main source of the non-denominational American civil religion that has shaped patriotism and the memory and meaning of the nation's birth ever since.

Memorial Day

Decoration DayMemorial Day weekendMay 25
Other sources of this idea include philosopher John Dewey who spoke of "common faith" (1934); sociologist Robin Murphy Williams' American Society: A Sociological Interpretation (1951) which stated there was a "common religion" in America; sociologist Lloyd Warner's analysis of the Memorial Day celebrations in "Yankee City" (1953 [1974]); historian Martin Marty's "religion in general" (1959); theologian Will Herberg who spoke of "the American Way of Life" (1960, 1974); historian Sidney Mead's "religion of the Republic" (1963); and British writer G. K. Chesterton, who said that the United States was "the only nation ... founded on a creed" and also coined the phrase "a nation with a soul of a church".
Scholars, following the lead of sociologist Robert Bellah, often make the argument that the United States has a secular "civil religion" – one with no association with any religious denomination or viewpoint – that has incorporated Memorial Day as a sacred event.

Federalist Party

FederalistFederalistsF
The elitists who ran the Federalists were conscious of the need to boost voter identification with their party.
The Federalists employed multiple festivities, exciting parades and even quasi-religious pilgrimages and "sacred" days that became incorporated into the American civil religion.

Seymour Martin Lipset

Lipset, Seymour M.Lipset, Seymour Martin[Seymour Martin] Lipset
Premier sociologist Seymour Lipset (1963) referred to "Americanism" and the "American Creed" to characterize a distinct set of values that Americans hold with a quasi-religious fervor.
American civil religion

Lost Cause of the Confederacy

Lost CauseThe Lost CauseMyth of the Lost Cause
Wilson says the "Lost Cause"—that is, defeat in a holy war—has left some southerners to face guilt, doubt, and the triumph of what they perceive as evil: in other words, to form a tragic sense of life.
The postwar era saw the birth of a regional "civil religion" that was heavy with symbolism and ritual; clergymen were the primary celebrants.

Judeo-Christian ethics

Judeo-Christian valuesJudeo-ChristianJudeo-Christian ethic
Judeo-Christian ethics
The idea that a common Judeo-Christian ethics or Judeo-Christian values underpins American politics, law and morals has been part of the "American civil religion" since the 1940s.

Commemoration of the American Revolution

Commemoration of the American Revolution
The Revolution became the main source of the non-denominational "American civil religion" that has shaped patriotism, and the memory and meaning of the nation's birth ever since.

Ceremonial deism

ceremonialgenerically theistic
Ceremonial deism
American civil religion

American exceptionalism

exceptionalismAmericanismAmerica is "exceptional
American exceptionalism
American civil religion

And I don't care what it is

"And I don't care what it is," Dwight Eisenhower quote from 1952
* American civil religion

Sociological theory

sociologicalsociological paradigmsociological theories
American civil religion is a sociological theory that a nonsectarian quasi-religious faith exists within the United States with sacred symbols drawn from national history.

Religion

religiousreligionsreligious beliefs
American civil religion is a sociological theory that a nonsectarian quasi-religious faith exists within the United States with sacred symbols drawn from national history.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
American civil religion is a sociological theory that a nonsectarian quasi-religious faith exists within the United States with sacred symbols drawn from national history.

United States Bicentennial

BicentennialU.S. BicentennialAmerican Bicentennial
The debate reached its peak with the American Bicentennial celebration in 1976.

United States Constitution

ConstitutionU.S. Constitutionconstitutional
There is a viewpoint that some Americans have come to see the document of the United States Constitution, along with the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights as cornerstones of a type of civic or civil religion or political religion.

United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceindependenceAmerican Declaration of Independence
There is a viewpoint that some Americans have come to see the document of the United States Constitution, along with the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights as cornerstones of a type of civic or civil religion or political religion.

United States Bill of Rights

Bill of RightsU.S. Bill of RightsBill of Rights Day
There is a viewpoint that some Americans have come to see the document of the United States Constitution, along with the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights as cornerstones of a type of civic or civil religion or political religion.

Abraham Lincoln

LincolnPresident LincolnPresident Abraham Lincoln
Presidents have often served in central roles in civil religion, and the nation provides quasi-religious honors to its martyrs—such as Abraham Lincoln and the soldiers killed in the American Civil War.

American Civil War

Civil WarU.S. Civil Warthe Civil War
Presidents have often served in central roles in civil religion, and the nation provides quasi-religious honors to its martyrs—such as Abraham Lincoln and the soldiers killed in the American Civil War.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
Historians have noted presidential level use of civil religion rhetoric in profoundly moving episodes such as World War II, the Civil Rights Movement, and the September 11th attacks.

Civil rights movement

civil rightscivil rights eraAmerican civil rights movement
Historians have noted presidential level use of civil religion rhetoric in profoundly moving episodes such as World War II, the Civil Rights Movement, and the September 11th attacks.

September 11 attacks

9/119/11 attacksSeptember 11, 2001
Historians have noted presidential level use of civil religion rhetoric in profoundly moving episodes such as World War II, the Civil Rights Movement, and the September 11th attacks.