American literaturewikipedia
American literature is literature written or produced in the United States and its preceding colonies (for specific discussions of poetry and theater, see Poetry of the United States and Theater in the United States).
American authorAmerican writerAmericanUnited StatesAmerican LiteratureliteratureAmerican writerswriterAmerican lettersAmerican novel

Uncle Tom's Cabin

TopsyLittle EvaSimon Legree
The political conflict surrounding abolitionism inspired the writings of William Lloyd Garrison and Harriet Beecher Stowe in her famous novel Uncle Tom's Cabin.
Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly, is an anti-slavery novel by American author Harriet Beecher Stowe.

F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott FitzgeraldFitzgeraldF. Scott
The short stories and novels of F. Scott Fitzgerald captured the mood of the 1920s, and John Dos Passos wrote too about the war.
While he achieved limited success in his lifetime, he is now widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century.

William Faulkner

William FaulknerFaulknerFaulknerian
William Faulkner became one of the greatest American writers with novels like The Sound and the Fury.
William Cuthbert Faulkner ( September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was an American writer and Nobel Prize laureate from Oxford, Mississippi.

Ernest Hemingway

Ernest HemingwayHemingwayHemingwayesque
Ernest Hemingway became famous with The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms; in 1954, he won the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Many of his works are considered classics of American literature.

To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbirdnovel of the same nameTequila Mockingbird
Henry Miller assumed a distinct place in American Literature in the 1930s when his semi-autobiographical novels were banned from the US. From the end of World War II until the early 1970s many popular works in modern American literature were produced, like Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird.
It was immediately successful, winning the Pulitzer Prize, and has become a classic of modern American literature.

Mark Twain

Mark TwainSamuel ClemensTwain
Mark Twain (the pen name used by Samuel Langhorne Clemens) was the first major American writer to be born away from the East Coast.
He was lauded as the "greatest humorist this country has produced", and William Faulkner called him "the father of American literature".

Harper Lee

Harper LeeNelle Harper LeeLee
Henry Miller assumed a distinct place in American Literature in the 1930s when his semi-autobiographical novels were banned from the US. From the end of World War II until the early 1970s many popular works in modern American literature were produced, like Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird.
Immediately successful, it won the 1961 Pulitzer Prize and has become a classic of modern American literature.

James Fenimore Cooper

James Fenimore CooperFenimore CooperCooper
James Fenimore Cooper was also a notable author best known for his novel, The Last of the Mohicans written in 1826.
His historical romances draw a picture of frontier and American Indian life in the early American days which created a unique form of American literature.

Susanna Rowson

Susannah Haswell RowsonSusanna Haswell RowsonSusanna Rowson
Susanna Rowson is best known for her novel, Charlotte: A Tale of Truth, published in London in 1791.
Rowson was the author of the 1791 novel Charlotte Temple, the most popular best-seller in American literature until Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin was published in 1852.

Catharine Sedgwick

Catharine Maria SedgwickCatharine MariaCatharine Sedgwick
Catherine Maria Sedgwick wrote A New England Tale in 1822, Redwood in 1824, Hope Leslie in 1827, and The Linwoods in 1835.
Her topics contributed to the creation of a national literature, enhanced by her detailed descriptions of nature.

The Last of the Mohicans

novel of the same namenovelThe Last of the Mohicans: A Narrative of 1757
James Fenimore Cooper was also a notable author best known for his novel, The Last of the Mohicans written in 1826.
The novel has been one of the most popular English-language novels since its publication and is frequently assigned reading in American literature courses.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Huckleberry FinnThe Adventures of Huckleberry FinnMark Twain novel
His regional masterpieces were the memoir Life on the Mississippi and the novels Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
Commonly named among the Great American Novels, the work is among the first in major American literature to be written throughout in vernacular English, characterized by local color regionalism.

Letters from an American Farmer

As the colonies moved toward independence from Britain, an important discussion of American culture and identity came from the French immigrant J. Hector St. John de Crèvecœur, whose Letters from an American Farmer addresses the question "What is an American?"
The work is recognised as being one of the first in the canon of American literature, and has influenced a diverse range of subsequent works.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Tom Sawyernovel of the same namenovel
His regional masterpieces were the memoir Life on the Mississippi and the novels Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
The novel has elements of humour, satire and social criticism; features that later made Mark Twain one of the most important authors of American literature.

John Updike

John UpdikeUpdikeUpdike, John
Henry Miller assumed a unique place in American Literature in the 1930s when his semi-autobiographical novels, written and published in Paris, were banned from the US. Although his major works, including Tropic of Cancer and Black Spring, would not be free of the label of obscenity until 1962, their themes and stylistic innovations had already exerted a major influence on succeeding generations of American writers, and paved the way for sexually frank 1960s novels by John Updike, Philip Roth, Gore Vidal, John Rechy and William Styron.
His work has attracted significant critical attention and praise, and he is widely considered one of the great American writers of his time.

Southern Gothic

southern gothicGothicSouthern mythology
Among its most respected practitioners was Flannery O'Connor, who developed a distinctive Southern gothic esthetic in which characters acted at one level as people and at another as symbols.
Southern Gothic is a subgenre of Gothic fiction in American literature that takes place in the American South.

William S. Burroughs

William BurroughsWilliam S. BurroughsBurroughs
Among the most representative achievements of the Beats in the novel are Jack Kerouac's On the Road (1957), the chronicle of a soul-searching travel through the continent, and William S. Burroughs's Naked Lunch (1959), a more experimental work structured as a series of vignettes relating, among other things, the narrator's travels and experiments with hard drugs.
J. G. Ballard considered Burroughs to be "the most important writer to emerge since the Second World War", while Norman Mailer declared him "the only American writer who may be conceivably possessed by genius".

Herman Melville

Herman MelvilleMelvilleMelville, Herman
Hawthorne influenced Herman Melville, who is notable for the books Moby-Dick and Billy Budd.
Over the next several months, Melville radically transformed his initial plan, conceiving what Delbanco has described as "the most ambitious book ever conceived by an American writer."

American Academy of Arts and Letters

American Academy of Arts and LettersNational Institute of Arts and LettersAmerican Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters
The American Academy of Arts and Letters is a 250-member honor society; its goal is to "foster, assist, and sustain excellence" in American literature, music, and art.

F. O. Matthiessen

Matthiessen, F.O.F.O. MatthiessenMatthiessen, F. O.
Francis Otto Matthiessen (February 19, 1902 – April 1, 1950) was an educator, scholar and literary critic influential in the fields of American literature and American studies.

Southern United States literature

southern literatureSouthernSouthern humor
Southern literature (sometimes called the literature of the American South) is defined as American literature about the Southern United States or by writers from this region.

Literature of New England

New England writers
The literature of New England has had an enduring influence on American literature in general, with themes such as religion, race, the individual versus society, social repression, and nature, emblematic of the larger concerns of American letters.

Jewish American literature

Jewish-American authorsJewish-AmericanJewish-American writer
Jewish American literature holds an essential place in the literary history of the United States.

Bless Me, Ultima

novelsame name1972 novel of the same name
Hispanic literature also became important during this period, starting with acclaimed novels by Tomás Rivera (...y no se lo tragó la tierra) and Rudolfo Anaya (Bless Me, Ultima), and the emergence of Chicano theater with Luis Valdez and Teatro Campesino.
However, In the last third of the twentieth century, the novel has initiated respect for Chicano literature as an important and nonderivative type of American literature among academics.

Chicano poetry

Chicano poetChicanos
Chicano poetry is a branch of American literature written by and primarily about Mexican Americans and the Mexican-American way of life in society.