Bell Beaker pottery, copper dagger, and flint arrowheads, from Lunteren in the Netherlands. Rijksmuseum of Oudheden
According to Allentoft (2015), the Sintashta culture probably derived at least partially from the Corded Ware Culture. Nordqvist and Heyd (2020) confirm this.
Bell Beaker burial from Shrewton, England, 2470–2210 BC
Bell Beaker from Ciempozuelos, beginning of the 2nd millennium BC
Gold disks from western Asturias. (Archaeological Museum of Asturias)
Model of the Castro of Zambujal, Portugal
Reconstruction of a Beaker burial (National Archaeological Museum of Spain, Madrid)
Bell Beaker from the Czech Republic
Reconstruction of the Pömmelte sanctuary, Germany
Bell Beakers from Thuringia, Germany and Tököl, Hungary, c. 2500-2200 BC
Copper dagger from Brandenburg, Germany, c. 2500–2200 BC
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Gold lunula from Lower Saxony, Germany
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Gold discs from Tedavnet, Ireland, 2200-2000 BC
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Gold lunula and discs from Coggalbeg, Ireland, 2300–2000 BC.
Bell Beaker, stone wristguard with gold studs, copper dagger and bone toggle.
Stonehenge
Gold lunula from Scotland, c.2300-2000 BC
Silbury Hill
Bell Beaker sites in Italy
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Gold discs from Eythra, Germany
Csepel group house, Hungary.<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.researchgate.net/publication/255791946_Pasztor_E_and_PBarna_J_2014_Neolithic_longhouses_and_Bronze_Age_houses_in_Central_Europe_In_CLN_Ruggles_ed_Handbook_of_Archaeoastronomy_and_Ethnoastronomy_1307-1316|title=Handbook of Archaeoastronomy and Ethnoastronomy|date=2015|chapter=Neolithic Longhouses and Bronze Age Houses in Central Europe|pages=1307–1315|last1=Pasztor|first1=Emilia|last2=Barna|first2=Judit|editor-last1=Ruggles|editor-first1=CLN}}</ref>
Stone wristguard

Among those discovered were: five funerary pots of the type associated with the Beaker culture; three tiny copper knives; sixteen barbed flint arrowheads; a kit of flint-knapping and metalworking tools, including cushion stones that functioned as a kind of portable anvil, which suggests he was a coppersmith; and some boar tusks.

- Amesbury Archer

Many barrows surround it and an unusual number of 'rich' burials can be found nearby, such as the Amesbury Archer and the later Bush Barrow.

- Bell Beaker culture
Bell Beaker pottery, copper dagger, and flint arrowheads, from Lunteren in the Netherlands. Rijksmuseum of Oudheden

2 related topics

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Stonehenge in July 2007

Stonehenge

Prehistoric monument on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, England, 2 mi west of Amesbury.

Prehistoric monument on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, England, 2 mi west of Amesbury.

Stonehenge in July 2007
Plan of Stonehenge in 2004. After Cleal et al. and Pitts. Italicised numbers in the text refer to the labels on this plan. Trilithon lintels omitted for clarity. Holes that no longer, or never, contained stones are shown as open circles. Stones visible today are shown coloured.
Stonehenge 1. After Cleal et al.
Graffiti on the sarsen stones include ancient carvings of a dagger and an axe
Sketch showing the tongue and groove and mortise and tenon joints used in the outer Sarsen circle
Plan of the central stone structure today; after Johnson 2008
Computer rendering of the overall site
The southwest face of the Heel Stone in May 2016
The sun behind the Heel Stone on the Summer solstice, shortly after sunrise
The oldest known depiction of Stonehenge, from the second quarter of the 14th century. A giant helps Merlin build Stonehenge. From a manuscript of the Roman de Brut by Wace in the British Library (Egerton 3028).
The earliest-known realistic painting of Stonehenge, drawn on site with watercolours by Lucas de Heere between 1573 and 1575
Farm waggons near the site, c. 1885
10th Battalion, CEF marches past the site, winter 1914–15 (the First World War); Background: Preservation work on stones, propped up by timbers
Sunrise at Stonehenge on the summer solstice, 21 June 2005
Dancing inside the stones, 1984 Stonehenge Free Festival
Stonehenge at sunset
The visitor centre at Stonehenge
17th-century depiction of Stonehenge from the Atlas van Loon
As painted by John Constable, 1835
An early photograph of Stonehenge taken July 1877
The monument from a similar angle in 2008 showing the extent of reconstruction
A contemporary newspaper depiction of the 1920 restoration

This ambitious phase has been radiocarbon dated to between 2600 and 2400 BC, slightly earlier than the Stonehenge Archer, discovered in the outer ditch of the monument in 1978, and the two sets of burials, known as the Amesbury Archer and the Boscombe Bowmen, discovered 3 mi to the west.

The Bell Beaker people arrived later, around 2,500 BC, migrating from mainland Europe.

Replica of slate stone wrist-guard as it might have been worn.

Stone wrist-guard

Replica of slate stone wrist-guard as it might have been worn.

Early Bronze Age stone wrist-guards are found across Europe from around 2400-1900 BC and are closely associated with the Beaker culture and Unetice culture.

However, recent research has highlighted that (in Britain at least) they do not commonly occur in graves in association with arrowheads (the Amesbury Archer being a notable exception), nor are they commonly found on the part of the arm that would need protection from the bowstring (on a right-handed archer, the inside left wrist).