Replica of slate stone wrist-guard as it might have been worn.

On his forearm was a black stone wrist-guard.

- Amesbury Archer

However, recent research has highlighted that (in Britain at least) they do not commonly occur in graves in association with arrowheads (the Amesbury Archer being a notable exception), nor are they commonly found on the part of the arm that would need protection from the bowstring (on a right-handed archer, the inside left wrist).

- Stone wrist-guard

1 related topic

Alpha

Bell Beaker pottery, copper dagger, and flint arrowheads, from Lunteren in the Netherlands. Rijksmuseum of Oudheden

Bell Beaker culture

Archaeological culture named after the inverted-bell beaker drinking vessel used at the very beginning of the European Bronze Age.

Archaeological culture named after the inverted-bell beaker drinking vessel used at the very beginning of the European Bronze Age.

Bell Beaker pottery, copper dagger, and flint arrowheads, from Lunteren in the Netherlands. Rijksmuseum of Oudheden
According to Allentoft (2015), the Sintashta culture probably derived at least partially from the Corded Ware Culture. Nordqvist and Heyd (2020) confirm this.
Bell Beaker burial from Shrewton, England, 2470–2210 BC
Bell Beaker from Ciempozuelos, beginning of the 2nd millennium BC
Gold disks from western Asturias. (Archaeological Museum of Asturias)
Model of the Castro of Zambujal, Portugal
Reconstruction of a Beaker burial (National Archaeological Museum of Spain, Madrid)
Bell Beaker from the Czech Republic
Reconstruction of the Pömmelte sanctuary, Germany
Bell Beakers from Thuringia, Germany and Tököl, Hungary, c. 2500-2200 BC
Copper dagger from Brandenburg, Germany, c. 2500–2200 BC
270x270px
Gold lunula from Lower Saxony, Germany
202x202px
184x184px
Gold discs from Tedavnet, Ireland, 2200-2000 BC
186x186px
148x148px
Gold lunula and discs from Coggalbeg, Ireland, 2300–2000 BC.
Bell Beaker, stone wristguard with gold studs, copper dagger and bone toggle.
Stonehenge
Gold lunula from Scotland, c.2300-2000 BC
Silbury Hill
Bell Beaker sites in Italy
187x187px
190x190px
Gold discs from Eythra, Germany
Csepel group house, Hungary.<ref>{{cite book|url=https://www.researchgate.net/publication/255791946_Pasztor_E_and_PBarna_J_2014_Neolithic_longhouses_and_Bronze_Age_houses_in_Central_Europe_In_CLN_Ruggles_ed_Handbook_of_Archaeoastronomy_and_Ethnoastronomy_1307-1316|title=Handbook of Archaeoastronomy and Ethnoastronomy|date=2015|chapter=Neolithic Longhouses and Bronze Age Houses in Central Europe|pages=1307–1315|last1=Pasztor|first1=Emilia|last2=Barna|first2=Judit|editor-last1=Ruggles|editor-first1=CLN}}</ref>
Stone wristguard

Under the "pots, not people" theory, the Beaker culture is seen as a 'package' of knowledge (including religious beliefs, as well as methods of copper, bronze, and gold working) and artefacts (including copper daggers, v-perforated buttons, and stone wrist-guards) adopted and adapted by the indigenous peoples of Europe to varying degrees.

Many barrows surround it and an unusual number of 'rich' burials can be found nearby, such as the Amesbury Archer and the later Bush Barrow.