Amos Bronson Alcott

Bronson AlcottAlcottA. Bronson AlcottBronsonALCOTT, Amos BronsonAmos AlcottAmos Broson AlcottMr. Alcottthe Alcott family
Amos Bronson Alcott (November 29, 1799March 4, 1888) was an American teacher, writer, philosopher, and reformer.wikipedia
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Louisa May Alcott

Louisa M. AlcottAlcottfamous writer
Their second was Louisa May, who fictionalized her experience with the family in her novel Little Women in 1868.
Raised in New England by her transcendentalist parents, Abigail May and Amos Bronson Alcott, she grew up among many of the well-known intellectuals of the day, such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

Veganism

veganvegansvegan diet
He hoped to perfect the human spirit and, to that end, advocated a vegan diet before the term was coined.
In Massachusetts, Amos Bronson Alcott, father of the novelist Louisa May Alcott, opened the Temple School in 1834 and Fruitlands in 1844, and in England, James Pierrepont Greaves founded the Concordium, a vegan community at Alcott House on Ham Common, in 1838.

Fruitlands (transcendental center)

FruitlandsFruitlands Museum
Based on his ideas for human perfection, Alcott founded Fruitlands, a transcendentalist experiment in community living.
Fruitlands was a Utopian agrarian commune established in Harvard, Massachusetts, by Amos Bronson Alcott and Charles Lane in the 1840s, based on Transcendentalist principles.

Abby May

Abby May AlcottAbbaAbigail May
Alcott married Abby May in 1830 and they eventually had four surviving children, all daughters.
She was the wife of Transcendentalist Amos Bronson Alcott and mother of four daughters, including Civil War novelist Louisa May Alcott.

Little Women

novel of the same nameJosephine "Jo" Marchnovel
Their second was Louisa May, who fictionalized her experience with the family in her novel Little Women in 1868.
Niles pressed her to write the girls' book first, and he was aided by her father Amos Bronson Alcott, who also urged her to do so.

Temple School (Massachusetts)

Temple School
His most well-known teaching position was at the Temple School in Boston.
The Temple School (1834-ca.1841) in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, was established by Amos Bronson Alcott in 1834, and featured a teaching style based on conversation.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

EmersonEmersonian[Ralph Waldo] Emerson
Alcott became friends with Ralph Waldo Emerson and became a major figure in transcendentalism. Beginning in 1836, Alcott's membership in the Transcendental Club put him in such company as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Orestes Brownson and Theodore Parker.
Bronson Alcott announced his plans in November 1842 to find "a farm of a hundred acres in excellent condition with good buildings, a good orchard and grounds".

William Alcott

Dr. William Alcott
Bronson gave it up after only a month and was self-educated from then on. He was not particularly social and his only close friend was his neighbor and second cousin William Alcott, with whom he shared books and ideas.
He attended local schools and became a close friend with his near neighbor Amos Bronson Alcott who would later enjoy wide fame as a philosopher and as the father of writer Louisa May Alcott.

Abolitionism in the United States

abolitionistabolitionistsabolitionism
He was also an abolitionist and an advocate for women's rights.
By the end of 1840, Garrison himself announced the formation of a third new organization, the Friends of Universal Reform, with sponsors and founding members including prominent reformers Maria Chapman, Abby Kelley Foster, Oliver Johnson, and Bronson Alcott (father of Louisa May Alcott).

Elizabeth Peabody

Elizabeth Palmer PeabodyElizabethElizabeth P. Peabody
His assistant was Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, later replaced by Margaret Fuller.
During 1834–1835, she worked as assistant teacher to Amos Bronson Alcott at his experimental Temple School in Boston.

Wolcott, Connecticut

WolcottWolcott, Conn
Born in Wolcott, Connecticut in 1799, Alcott had only minimal formal schooling before attempting a career as a traveling salesman.
Amos Bronson Alcott (1799–1888), father of Louisa May Alcott, born in Wolcott, teacher, writer, and founder of the utopian community "Fruitlands"

Elizabeth Sewall Alcott

ElizabethElizabeth Peabody Alcott
Born on June 24, 1835, she was named Elizabeth Peabody Alcott in honor of the teaching assistant at the Temple School.
She was originally named Elizabeth Peabody Alcott in honor of her father Bronson's teaching assistant at the Temple School and close friend of her mother, Abba.

Cheshire, Connecticut

CheshireCheshire, CTBrooksvale
The school taught only reading, writing, and spelling and he left this school at the age of 10. At age 13, his uncle, Reverend Tillotson Bronson, invited Alcott into his home in Cheshire, Connecticut, to be educated and prepared for college.
Amos Bronson Alcott (1799–1888), schoolmaster

Transcendentalism

transcendentalistTranscendentaliststranscendental
Alcott became friends with Ralph Waldo Emerson and became a major figure in transcendentalism.
Major figures in the transcendentalist movement were Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, and Amos Bronson Alcott.

Anna Alcott Pratt

AnnaAnna Bronson AlcottAnna Bronson Alcott Pratt
It was there that their first child, a daughter they named Anna Bronson Alcott, was born on March 16, 1831, after 36 hours of labor.
She was the first of four daughter born to Amos Bronson Alcott and Abby May.

Margaret Fuller

Margaret Fuller OssoliMargaret Fuller SchoolOssoli, Margaret Fuller
His assistant was Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, later replaced by Margaret Fuller.
In 1836, Fuller was given a job teaching at Bronson Alcott's Temple School in Boston, where she remained for a year.

Germantown Academy

GermantownGermantown Academy Patriots
A wealthy Quaker named Reuben Haines proposed he and educator William Russell start a new school in Pennsylvania associated with the Germantown Academy.
In 1830, Amos Bronson Alcott, father of Louisa May Alcott, was appointed headmaster and attempts were made to co-educate the school but were quickly abandoned.

William Lloyd Garrison

GarrisonGarrisonianGarrisonian abolitionism
In November 1830, he and William Lloyd Garrison founded what he later called a "preliminary Anti-Slavery Society", though he differed from Garrison as a nonresistant.
By the end of 1840, Garrison announced the formation of a third new organization, the Friends of Universal Reform, with sponsors and founding members including prominent reformers Maria Chapman, Abby Kelley Foster, Oliver Johnson, and Amos Bronson Alcott (father of Louisa May Alcott).

The Dial

DialDial AwardDial Press
Alcott also wrote a series patterned after the work of German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe which were eventually published in the Transcendentalists' journal, The Dial.
The title of the journal, which was suggested by Amos Bronson Alcott, intended to evoke a sundial.

Mary Tyler Peabody Mann

Mary PeabodyMary MannMary Tyler
Mary Peabody Mann served as a French instructor for a time.
After a short interlude of substituting for Elizabeth at Amos Bronson Alcott’s experimental Temple School, Mary returned to Salem, where she established a successful school for little children in her home and began to write educational works for children and parents.

Boston Vigilance Committee

Boston's first vigilance committeeCommittee of Vigilance
Alcott became a member of the Boston Vigilance Committee.
Amos Bronson Alcott

Henry David Thoreau

ThoreauHenry Thoreau(Henry David) Thoreau
The incident inspired Henry David Thoreau, whose similar protest led to a night in jail and his essay "Civil Disobedience".
Amos Bronson Alcott and Thoreau's aunt each wrote that "Thoreau" is pronounced like the word thorough ( —in General American, but more precisely —in 19th-century New England).

Transcendental Club

New England TranscendentalistsHedge ClubTranscendentalists
Beginning in 1836, Alcott's membership in the Transcendental Club put him in such company as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Orestes Brownson and Theodore Parker.
Other members of the club included Amos Bronson Alcott, Orestes Brownson, Theodore Parker, Henry David Thoreau, William Henry Channing, James Freeman Clarke, Christopher Pearse Cranch, Convers Francis, Sylvester Judd, and Jones Very.

Charles Lane (transcendentalist)

Charles Lane
He met two admirers, Charles Lane and Henry C. Wright.
Along with Amos Bronson Alcott, he was one of the main founders of Fruitlands.

Theodore Parker

Parker
Beginning in 1836, Alcott's membership in the Transcendental Club put him in such company as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Orestes Brownson and Theodore Parker.
Ralph Waldo Emerson's Divinity School Address that year had been deeply arresting to him, and he welcomed the opportunity to associate with Emerson, Amos Bronson Alcott, Orestes Brownson, and several others.