Amt Neuhaus

NeuhausNeuhaus upon ElbeKonauNeuhaus an der ElbeNeuhaus in DarzingSückau
Amt Neuhaus is a municipality in the District of Lüneburg, in Lower Saxony, Germany.wikipedia
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Saxe-Lauenburg

Duchy of Saxe-LauenburgLauenburgDuchy of Lauenburg
The original "municipal office of Neuhaus" existed since at least the 17th century until 1885, consecutively as part of Saxe-Lauenburg (which ceased to exist in 1689), Electorate of Hanover (1689-1810), Kingdom of Hanover (1814-1866), and the Prussian Province of Hanover (1866-1885). The area was named as the Land of Darzing, when the co-ruling Saxon dukes Albert II and his nephews Albert III, Eric I and John II partitioned Saxony into Saxe-Lauenburg and Saxe-Wittenberg before 20 September 1296.
After the residential castle in Lauenburg upon Elbe (started in 1180–1182 by Duke Bernard I) had burnt down in 1616, Francis II moved the capital to Neuhaus upon Elbe.

Lüneburg (district)

district of LüneburgLüneburgLüneburg district
Amt Neuhaus is a municipality in the District of Lüneburg, in Lower Saxony, Germany. At the introduction of Prussian style district administration in Hanover on 1 April 1885 Neuhaus area became part of the Bleckede district, merged into the District of Lüneburg on 1 October 1932.
In 1993 the municipality of Amt Neuhaus joined Lower Saxony and the District of Lüneburg.

Catherine of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Duchess of Saxe-Lauenburg

Catherine of Brunswick-WolfenbüttelCatherine
It served the duchess dowager Catherine (*1488 – 29 July 1563*, Neuhaus), widow of Magnus I, as residence until her death.
Catherine of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (1488 – 29 June 1563, Neuhaus upon Elbe) was a member of the house of Welf and a Princess of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and by marriage Duchess of Saxe-Lauenburg.

Lower Saxony

NiedersachsenLower SaxonLower-Saxony
Amt Neuhaus is a municipality in the District of Lüneburg, in Lower Saxony, Germany.
The former Hanoverian Amt Neuhaus with its parishes of Dellien, Haar, Kaarßen, Neuhaus (Elbe), Stapel, Sückau, Sumte and Tripkau as well as the villages of Neu Bleckede, Neu Wendischthun and Stiepelse in the parish of Teldau and the historic Hanoverian region in the forest district of Bohldamm in the parish of Garlitz transferred with effect from 30 June 1993 from Mecklenburg-Vorpommern to Lower Saxony (Lüneburg district).

John II, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg

John IIJohn II of Saxe-LauenburgJohn II of Lauenburg
The area was named as the Land of Darzing, when the co-ruling Saxon dukes Albert II and his nephews Albert III, Eric I and John II partitioned Saxony into Saxe-Lauenburg and Saxe-Wittenberg before 20 September 1296.
The definite partitioning of Saxony into Saxe-Lauenburg, jointly ruled by John II and his brothers and Saxe-Wittenberg, ruled by their uncle Albert II, took place before 20 September 1296, when the Vierlande, Sadelbande (Land of Lauenburg), the Land of Ratzeburg, the Land of Darzing (later Amt Neuhaus), and the Land of Hadeln are mentioned as the separate territory of the brothers.

Eric I, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg

Eric IEric I of Saxe-LauenburgEric I, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg-Ratzeburg
The area was named as the Land of Darzing, when the co-ruling Saxon dukes Albert II and his nephews Albert III, Eric I and John II partitioned Saxony into Saxe-Lauenburg and Saxe-Wittenberg before 20 September 1296.
The definite partitioning of Saxony into Saxe-Lauenburg, jointly ruled by Eric I and his brothers and Saxe-Wittenberg, ruled by their uncle Albert II, took place before 20 September 1296, when the Vierlande, Sadelbande (Land of Lauenburg), the Land of Ratzeburg, the Land of Darzing (later Amt Neuhaus), and the Land of Hadeln are mentioned as the separate territory of the brothers.

Kingdom of Hanover

HanoverHanoverianKingdom of Hannover
The original "municipal office of Neuhaus" existed since at least the 17th century until 1885, consecutively as part of Saxe-Lauenburg (which ceased to exist in 1689), Electorate of Hanover (1689-1810), Kingdom of Hanover (1814-1866), and the Prussian Province of Hanover (1866-1885).
It lost those parts of Saxe-Lauenburg to the northeast of the Elbe, which was assigned in personal union to Denmark, except the Amt Neuhaus.

Albert III, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg

Albert IIIAlbert III of Saxe-Lauenburg
The area was named as the Land of Darzing, when the co-ruling Saxon dukes Albert II and his nephews Albert III, Eric I and John II partitioned Saxony into Saxe-Lauenburg and Saxe-Wittenberg before 20 September 1296.
The definite partitioning of Saxony into Saxe-Lauenburg, jointly ruled by Albert III and his brothers and Saxe-Wittenberg, ruled by their uncle Albert II, took place by 20 September 1296, at which time the Vierlande, Sadelbande (Land of Lauenburg), the Land of Ratzeburg, the Land of Darzing (later Amt Neuhaus), and the Land of Hadeln are mentioned as the separate territories of the brothers.

Duchy of Saxe-Wittenberg

Saxe-Wittenbergyounger Duchy of SaxonySaxony-Wittenberg
The area was named as the Land of Darzing, when the co-ruling Saxon dukes Albert II and his nephews Albert III, Eric I and John II partitioned Saxony into Saxe-Lauenburg and Saxe-Wittenberg before 20 September 1296.
Duke Bernard died in 1212 and his two surviving sons divided the Saxon heritage: the elder Henry took the old Ascanian allodial possessions around Ballenstedt where he established the Ascanian County of Anhalt, while his younger brother Albert I inherited the title of a Duke of Saxony and retained three territorially unconnected Eastphalian estates on the Elbe river around the towns of Wittenberg and Belzig as well as the northern lordship of Lauenburg with Amt Neuhaus and Land Hadeln at the Elbe estuary.

Albert II, Duke of Saxony

Albert IIAgnes of HabsburgAlbert II of Saxony
The area was named as the Land of Darzing, when the co-ruling Saxon dukes Albert II and his nephews Albert III, Eric I and John II partitioned Saxony into Saxe-Lauenburg and Saxe-Wittenberg before 20 September 1296.
The definite partitioning of the Duchy of Saxony into Saxe-Lauenburg, jointly ruled by the brothers Albert III, Eric I and John II and Saxe-Wittenberg, ruled by Albert II took place before 20 September 1296, when the Vierlande, Sadelbande (Land of Lauenburg), the Land of Ratzeburg, the Land of Darzing (later Amt Neuhaus), and the Land of Hadeln are mentioned as the separate territory of the brothers.

Francis II, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg

Francis IIFrancis II of Saxe-LauenburgFrancis (II)
Around 1600 Duke Francis II restored Neuhaus Castle.
Francis then also used another residence in Neuhaus.

Augustus, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg

AugustusAugustus of Saxe-LauenburgLower Saxon Duke Augustus
On his ascension in 1619 Duke Augustus, son of Francis II, moved Saxe-Lauenburg's capital from Neuhaus upon Elbe towards Ratzeburg, where it remained since.
On his ascension Augustus moved Saxe-Lauenburg's capital from Neuhaus, whereto Francis II had moved it after the residential castle in Lauenburg upon Elbe (started in 1180–1182 by Bernhard, Count of Anhalt) had burnt down in 1616, towards Ratzeburg, where it remained since.

Duchy of Saxony

SaxonySaxonDuke of Saxony
In the course of the eastern colonisation the area of today's Amt Neuhaus became a part of the Duchy of Saxony.
The Vierlande, Sadelbande (Land of Lauenburg), the Land of Ratzeburg, the Land of Darzing (today's Amt Neuhaus), and the Land of Hadeln are mentioned as the separate territory of the brothers.

Allied-occupied Germany

GermanyBritish occupation zoneoccupied Germany
With the Allied occupation of Germany the situation changed again.
The Control Commission for Germany (British Element) (CCG/BE) ceded more slices of its area of occupation to the Soviet Union – specifically the Amt Neuhaus of Hanover and some exclaves and fringes of Brunswick, for example the County of Blankenburg, and exchanged some villages between British Holstein and Soviet Mecklenburg under the Barber-Lyashchenko Agreement.

Sumte, Lower Saxony, Germany

Sumte
Today's municipality of Amt Neuhaus then still consisted of eight independent municipalities: Dellien, Haar, Kaarßen, Neuhaus upon Elbe, Stapel, Sückau, Sumte and Tripkau.
Sumte is a village in the municipality of Amt Neuhaus, located 30 km east of the county town Lüneburg in the state of Lower Saxony in northern Germany.

Mecklenburg (1945–1952)

State of MecklenburgMecklenburg
The initial British occupation zone in Germany had no bridge between the bulk of the Hanover province south of the Elbe, and the Amt Neuhaus area north of the Elbe, so the British ceded the Neuhaus area to the state of Mecklenburg within the Soviet zone of occupation in Germany.
It consisted of the 1934-established Mecklenburg (a merger by the Nazi Gauleiter Friedrich Hildebrandt of the free states of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz) and parts of the former Prussian provinces of Pommern (Western Pomerania to the Oder–Neisse line) and Hanover (Amt Neuhaus).

Werner Conze

Werner Conze (born December 11, 1910 in Amt Neuhaus, died April 1986 in Heidelberg) was a pro- Nazi German historian in Nazi Germany, who continued to work as historian in post-World War II West Germany.

Carl Peters

Karl PetersPetersalleetitular German colonial leader
He was born at Neuhaus an der Elbe in the Kingdom of Hanover, the son of a Lutheran clergyman.

Jürgen Schult

Born in Amt Neuhaus, now in Niedersachsen, Schult was unable to compete in the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles due to his country's boycott of the games.

Anna Maria Franziska of Saxe-Lauenburg

Anna Maria FranziskaAnnaAnna Maria
After George William, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, had captured Saxe-Lauenburg and de facto taken the throne, inhibiting the ascension of the Duchess Anna Maria Franziska of Saxe-Lauenburg in 1689, Neuhaus Castle stood empty.

Bleckede

Altgarge UNRRA displaced persons camp
At the introduction of Prussian style district administration in Hanover on 1 April 1885 Neuhaus area became part of the Bleckede district, merged into the District of Lüneburg on 1 October 1932.
So both states stipulated in an interstate treaty to disentangle Neu Bleckede and Neu Wendischthun, as well as the neighbouring municipality of Amt Neuhaus from Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania with effect of 30 June 1993, when they were annexed to Lower Saxony.

Municipality

municipalitiesmunicipalmunicipal division
Amt Neuhaus is a municipality in the District of Lüneburg, in Lower Saxony, Germany.

Germany

GermanGERFederal Republic of Germany
Amt Neuhaus is a municipality in the District of Lüneburg, in Lower Saxony, Germany.

Electorate of Hanover

HanoverElector of HanoverHanoverian
The original "municipal office of Neuhaus" existed since at least the 17th century until 1885, consecutively as part of Saxe-Lauenburg (which ceased to exist in 1689), Electorate of Hanover (1689-1810), Kingdom of Hanover (1814-1866), and the Prussian Province of Hanover (1866-1885).

Province of Hanover

HanoverPrussian Hanover14. Weser-Ems
The original "municipal office of Neuhaus" existed since at least the 17th century until 1885, consecutively as part of Saxe-Lauenburg (which ceased to exist in 1689), Electorate of Hanover (1689-1810), Kingdom of Hanover (1814-1866), and the Prussian Province of Hanover (1866-1885).