Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station

South Pole StationAmundsen-Scott South Pole StationSouth PoleAmundsen-ScottAmundsen-Scott stationSouth Pole StationsAmundsen–ScottAmundsen Scott South Pole StationAmundsen-Scott research stationAmundsen-Scott South Pole
The Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station is a United States scientific research station at the South Pole, the southernmost place on the Earth.wikipedia
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South Pole

90Geographic South PoleSouth
The Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station is a United States scientific research station at the South Pole, the southernmost place on the Earth.
Situated on the continent of Antarctica, it is the site of the United States Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station, which was established in 1956 and has been permanently staffed since that year.

Antarctic Plateau

polar plateauEast Antarctic Plateauplateau
The station is located on the high plateau of Antarctica at an elevation of 2,835 metres (9,301 feet) above sea level and is administered by the Division of Polar Programs within the National Science Foundation under the United States Antarctic Program (USAP).
The Antarctic Plateau, Polar Plateau or King Haakon VII Plateau, is a large area of East Antarctica which extends over a diameter of about 1000 km, and includes the region of the geographic South Pole and the Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station.

Seabee

SeabeesNaval Construction BattalionConstruction Battalion
The original Amundsen–Scott Station was built by Navy Seabees for the Federal government of the United States during November 1956, as a part of its commitment to the scientific goals of the International Geophysical Year (IGY), an international effort lasting from January 1957 through June 1958, to study, among other things, the geophysics of the polar regions of Earth. The station was constructed by U.S Navy Seabees led by LTJG Richard Bowers, the 8-man Advance Party being transported by the VX-6 Air Squadron in 2 R4Ds on 20 Nov. 1956.
Another, in 1975, was the construction of the Buckminster Fuller Geodesic dome at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station by NMCB 71.

Degree Angular Scale Interferometer

DASI
Such experiments include the Python, Viper, and DASI telescopes, as well as the 10 m South Pole Telescope.
The Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI) was a telescope installed at the U.S. National Science Foundation's Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica.

International Geophysical Year

IGYearly polar expeditionsG.O. Fizzickle
The original Amundsen–Scott Station was built by Navy Seabees for the Federal government of the United States during November 1956, as a part of its commitment to the scientific goals of the International Geophysical Year (IGY), an international effort lasting from January 1957 through June 1958, to study, among other things, the geophysics of the polar regions of Earth. The first wintering-over party consisted of 8 IGY scientists led by Paul Siple and 8 Navy support men led by LTJG John Tuck.
The Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station was erected as the first permanent structure at the South Pole in January 1957.

IceCube Neutrino Observatory

IceCubeIceCube Neutrino DetectorIceCube Experiment
The AMANDA / IceCube experiment makes use of the two-mile (3 km)-thick ice sheet to detect neutrinos which have passed through the earth.
The IceCube Neutrino Observatory (or simply IceCube) is a neutrino observatory constructed at the Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica.

VX-6

The station was constructed by U.S Navy Seabees led by LTJG Richard Bowers, the 8-man Advance Party being transported by the VX-6 Air Squadron in 2 R4Ds on 20 Nov. 1956.
The squadron also transported people and materials necessary for the construction of Little America Base Camp, the Naval Air Operations Facility on Hut Point Peninsula (Ross Island), the first South Pole Station (now referred to as "Old Pole"), and assisted in the establishment of four other bases on the continent.

South Pole Telescope

SPTSPTpolvery large telescope
Such experiments include the Python, Viper, and DASI telescopes, as well as the 10 m South Pole Telescope.
The South Pole Telescope (SPT) is a 10-meter (394 in) diameter telescope located at the Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica.

Martin A. Pomerantz

Martin PomerantzMartin A.PomerantzMartin Arthur Pomerantz
An observatory building, the Martin A. Pomerantz Observatory (MAPO), was dedicated in 1995.
When the astronomical observatory at the United States Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station was opened in 1995, it was named the Martin A. Pomerantz Observatory (MAPO) in his honor.

United States Antarctic Program

United States Antarctic Research ProgramUnited States Antarctic ServiceU.S. Antarctic Service
The station is located on the high plateau of Antarctica at an elevation of 2,835 metres (9,301 feet) above sea level and is administered by the Division of Polar Programs within the National Science Foundation under the United States Antarctic Program (USAP).
South Pole Station is located at the geographic South Pole, on the polar plateau, at an elevation of 2,835 m (9,300 ft) above sea level.

BICEP and Keck Array

BICEP2Keck ArrayBackground Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization
The DASI telescope has since been decommissioned and its mount used for the Keck Array.
BICEP operates from Antarctica, at the Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station.

Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array

AMANDA
The AMANDA / IceCube experiment makes use of the two-mile (3 km)-thick ice sheet to detect neutrinos which have passed through the earth.
The Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) is a neutrino telescope located beneath the Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station.

VXE-6

Antarctic Development Squadron SixAntarctic Development Squadron Six (VXE-6)Squadron VXE-6
The 1998–1999 summer season was the last year that VXE-6 with its Lockheed LC-130s serviced the U.S. Antarctic Program.
Following the closure of austral summer operations at Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station in February 1999, the squadron returned to Naval Air Station Point Mugu, California, where it was disestablished on 31 March 1999.

McMurdo Station

McMurdoMcMurdo Research StationMcMurdo Station, Antarctica
Beginning in 1999–2000, the New York Air National Guard 109th Airlift Wing took responsibility for the daily cargo and passenger flights between McMurdo Station and the South Pole during the summer.
All personnel and cargo going to or coming from Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station first pass through McMurdo.

Geodesic dome

geodesic domesgeodesicgeodesic sphere
The station was moved in 1975 to the newly constructed Buckminster Fuller geodesic dome 50 m wide by 16 m high, with 14 x steel archways.
In 1975, a dome was constructed at the South Pole, where its resistance to snow and wind loads is important.

Earth

Earth's surfaceterrestrialworld
The Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station is a United States scientific research station at the South Pole, the southernmost place on the Earth.
(82°28′N) The southernmost is the Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station, in Antarctica, almost exactly at the South Pole.

Paul Siple

Paul A. SiplePaul Allman SiplePaul Allen Siple
The first wintering-over party consisted of 8 IGY scientists led by Paul Siple and 8 Navy support men led by LTJG John Tuck.
He was the inaugural scientific leader at the U.S. Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station 1956–1957, during the International Geophysical Year.

Antarctica

AntarcticAntarctic continentReference Elevation Model of Antarctica
The station is located on the high plateau of Antarctica at an elevation of 2,835 metres (9,301 feet) above sea level and is administered by the Division of Polar Programs within the National Science Foundation under the United States Antarctic Program (USAP).
Astrophysicists at Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station study the celestial dome and cosmic microwave background radiation.

Roald Amundsen

AmundsenAmundsen’sAmundsen Outpost
It is named in honor of Norwegian Roald Amundsen and Englishman Robert F. Scott, who led separate teams that raced to become the first to the South Pole in the early 1900s.
The Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station, operated by the United States Antarctic Program, was jointly named in honour of Amundsen and his rival.

Polar regions of Earth

polar regionpolarpolar regions
The original Amundsen–Scott Station was built by Navy Seabees for the Federal government of the United States during November 1956, as a part of its commitment to the scientific goals of the International Geophysical Year (IGY), an international effort lasting from January 1957 through June 1958, to study, among other things, the geophysics of the polar regions of Earth.
Other notable stations include Palmer Station and Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station (United States), Esperanza Base and Marambio Base (Argentina), Scott Base (New Zealand), and Vostok Station (Russia).

Tracking and data relay satellite

TDRSTDRS ATDRS-A
Data access to the station is provided by NASA's TDRS-4, 5, and 6 satellites, the DOD DSCS-3 satellite, and the commercial Iridium satellite constellation.
A tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) is a type of communications satellite that forms part of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) used by NASA and other United States government agencies for communications to and from independent "User Platforms" such as satellites, balloons, aircraft, the International Space Station, and remote bases like the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.

Lockheed LC-130

LC-130LC-130 HerculesLC-130F Hercules
The 1998–1999 summer season was the last year that VXE-6 with its Lockheed LC-130s serviced the U.S. Antarctic Program.
The primary mission of the LC-130 is supporting the scientific community in Antarctica by transporting cargo and personnel from the McMurdo Station to field stations and camps, including the Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station.

Jerri Nielsen

Dr. Jerri NielsenRescue from the South PoleSaving Dr. Nielsen
In 1999, the winter-over physician, Jerri Nielsen, found that she had breast cancer.
Dr. Jerri Lin Nielsen (née Cahill; March 1, 1952 – June 23, 2009) was an American physician with extensive emergency room experience, who self-treated her breast cancer while stationed at Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica until she could be evacuated safely.

South Pole Traverse

McMurdo-(Amundsen-Scott) South Pole highwayMcMurdo – South Pole HighwayMcMurdo-South Pole highway
There is a snow road over the ice sheet from McMurdo, the McMurdo-South Pole highway.
The South Pole Traverse, also called the McMurdo–South Pole Highway, is an approximately 995 mi compacted snow road in Antarctica that links the United States's McMurdo Station on the coast to the Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station.

Viper telescope

Viper
Such experiments include the Python, Viper, and DASI telescopes, as well as the 10 m South Pole Telescope.
The Viper telescope was located at the Center for Astrophysical Research, also known as (CARA) in the Amundsen-Scott station in Antarctica.