An Essay on the Principle of Population

Essay on the Principle of PopulationAn Essay on the Principles of PopulationIron law of populationMalthus's theory of populationPrinciple of Population
The book An Essay on the Principle of Population was first published anonymously in 1798, but the author was soon identified as Thomas Robert Malthus.wikipedia
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Sigmoid function

sigmoidalsigmoidsigmoid curve
The logistic function of Pierre François Verhulst (1804–1849) results in the S-curve.

Struggle for existence

Struggle for Survivalmutual strugglenatural law of selection by struggle
From the 17th century onwards the concept was associated with a population exceeding resources, an issue shown starkly in Thomas Robert Malthus’ An Essay on the Principle of Population which drew on Benjamin Franklin's Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind, Peopling of Countries, etc..

Index of environmental articles

List of environment topicsList of environmental topics
An Essay on the Principle of Population

Essay

essaysarticlesessayist
While brevity usually defines an essay, voluminous works like John Locke's An Essay Concerning Human Understanding and Thomas Malthus's An Essay on the Principle of Population are counterexamples.

Evolution

evolvedtheory of evolutionevolutionary
Partly influenced by An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798) by Thomas Robert Malthus, Darwin noted that population growth would lead to a "struggle for existence" in which favourable variations prevailed as others perished.

1798 in science

1798
* Thomas Robert Malthus publishes the first edition of An Essay on the Principle of Population (anonymously) in London.

Marxian economics

MarxianMarxian economistMarxist economics
Malthus' claim in An Essay on the Principle of Population (1798) that population growth was the primary cause of subsistence level wages for laborers provoked Marx to develop an alternative theory of wage determination.

List of fictional United States presidencies of historical figures (E–G)

In this universe as in real life, the 18th-century English economist Reverend Thomas Robert Malthus published his highly influential An Essay on the Principle of Population which warned that humanity would be condemned to misery and poverty because the rate of population growth would increase faster than the rate of food supply.

Iron law of wages

Lassalle's Iron Law of WagesSubsistence theory of wages
Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels attribute the doctrine to Lassalle (notably in Marx's 1875 Critique of the Gotha Program), the idea to Thomas Malthus's An Essay on the Principle of Population, and the terminology to Goethe's "great, eternal iron laws" in Das Göttliche.

Human population planning

human population controlpopulation controlpopulation planning
In the 20th century, population planning proponents have drawn from the insights of Thomas Malthus, a British clergyman and economist who published An Essay on the Principle of Population in 1798.

Income and fertility

Fertility-development controversyfertility-income paradoxdeclining fertility rate
The inverse relationship between income and fertility has been termed a demographic-economic paradox. Thomas Malthus, in his book An Essay on the Principle of Population, proposed that greater means (higher income) would enable the production of more offspring (a higher fertility rate).

History of ecology

ecological historyecologistsecology
In An Essay on the Principle of Population Malthus argues for the reining in of rising population through 2 checks: Positive and Preventive checks.

History of liberalism

classical liberalClassical liberalismliberalism
Thomas Malthus wrote An Essay on the Principle of Population in 1798, becoming a major influence on classical liberalism.

Historiography of the Poor Laws

His famous work Essay on the Principle of Population contained one chapter dedicated to the Poor Law, and many of his criticisms found their way into the Poor Law report of 1834, which overhauled the system