Analog Science Fiction and Fact

Astounding Science FictionAnalogAstoundingAstounding StoriesAnalog Science Fiction/Science FactAstounding Science-FictionAstounding SFAnalog Science FictionAnalog MagazineAnalog Science Fact & Fiction
Analog Science Fiction and Fact is an American science fiction magazine published under various titles since 1930.wikipedia
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Science fiction magazine

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Analog Science Fiction and Fact is an American science fiction magazine published under various titles since 1930.
Major American science-fiction magazines include Amazing Stories, Astounding Science Fiction, Galaxy Science Fiction, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction and Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine.

Street & Smith

Street and SmithStreet & Smith Publications, Inc.Street & Smith Publications
Clayton went bankrupt in 1933 and the magazine was sold to Street & Smith.
Among their many titles was the science fiction pulp magazine Astounding Stories, acquired from Clayton Magazines in 1933, and retained until 1961.

F. Orlin Tremaine

The new editor was F. Orlin Tremaine, who soon made Astounding the leading magazine in the nascent pulp science fiction field, publishing well-regarded stories such as Jack Williamson's Legion of Space and John W. Campbell's "Twilight".
Frederick Orlin Tremaine (January 7, 1899 – October 22, 1956) was an American science fiction magazine editor, most notably of the influential Astounding Stories.

Foundation series

Foundation'' seriesFoundationFoundation Trilogy
Over the next few years Campbell published many stories that became classics in the field, including Isaac Asimov's Foundation series, A. E. van Vogt's Slan, and several novels and stories by Robert A. Heinlein.
The original trilogy of novels collected a series of eight short stories published in Astounding Magazine between May 1942 and January 1950.

Golden Age of Science Fiction

Golden AgeGolden Age SFbegan to age in the 1950s
The period beginning with Campbell's editorship is often referred to as the Golden Age of Science Fiction.
One leading influence on the creation of the Golden age was John W. Campbell, who became legendary in the genre as an editor and publisher of science fiction magazines, including Astounding Science Fiction, to such an extent that Isaac Asimov stated that "...in the 1940s, (Campbell) dominated the field to the point where to many seemed all of science fiction."

Harry Bates (author)

Harry BatesHawk Carse
Originally titled Astounding Stories of Super-Science, the first issue was dated January 1930, published by William Clayton, and edited by Harry Bates.
He began working for William Clayton in the 1920s as the editor of adventure pulp magazines.

A. E. van Vogt

A.E. van Vogtvan VogtAlfred E. van Vogt
Over the next few years Campbell published many stories that became classics in the field, including Isaac Asimov's Foundation series, A. E. van Vogt's Slan, and several novels and stories by Robert A. Heinlein.
He was inspired by the August 1938 issue of Astounding Science Fiction, which he picked up at a newsstand.

Slan

slan shackFans Are Slansslanshack
Over the next few years Campbell published many stories that became classics in the field, including Isaac Asimov's Foundation series, A. E. van Vogt's Slan, and several novels and stories by Robert A. Heinlein.
The novel was originally serialized in the magazine Astounding Science Fiction (September–December 1940).

Ben Bova

As on a Darkling PlainMars FartsMillennium
Ben Bova took over from 1972 to 1978, and the character of the magazine changed noticeably, since Bova was willing to publish fiction that included sexual content and profanity.
He is the author of more than 120 works of science fact and fiction, he is six-time winner of the Hugo Award, a former editor of Analog Magazine, a former editorial director of Omni; he was also president of both the National Space Society and the Science Fiction Writers of America.

Scientology

ScientologistScientologistsInternational Association of Scientologists
By 1950, new competition had appeared from Galaxy Science Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Campbell's interest in some pseudo-science topics, such as Dianetics (an early version of Scientology), alienated some of his regular writers, and Astounding was no longer regarded as the leader of the field, though it did continue to publish popular and influential stories: Hal Clement's novel Mission of Gravity appeared in 1953, and Tom Godwin's "The Cold Equations" appeared the following year.
In May 1950, Hubbard's Dianetics: The Evolution of a Science was published by pulp magazine Astounding Science Fiction.

Mission of Gravity

By 1950, new competition had appeared from Galaxy Science Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Campbell's interest in some pseudo-science topics, such as Dianetics (an early version of Scientology), alienated some of his regular writers, and Astounding was no longer regarded as the leader of the field, though it did continue to publish popular and influential stories: Hal Clement's novel Mission of Gravity appeared in 1953, and Tom Godwin's "The Cold Equations" appeared the following year.
The novel was serialized in Astounding Science Fiction magazine in April–July 1953.

The Cold Equations

Cold Equationsthe original short story
By 1950, new competition had appeared from Galaxy Science Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Campbell's interest in some pseudo-science topics, such as Dianetics (an early version of Scientology), alienated some of his regular writers, and Astounding was no longer regarded as the leader of the field, though it did continue to publish popular and influential stories: Hal Clement's novel Mission of Gravity appeared in 1953, and Tom Godwin's "The Cold Equations" appeared the following year.
"The Cold Equations" is a science fiction short story by American writer Tom Godwin, first published in Astounding Magazine in 1954.

Hal Clement

ClementHarry StubbsClement, Hal
By 1950, new competition had appeared from Galaxy Science Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Campbell's interest in some pseudo-science topics, such as Dianetics (an early version of Scientology), alienated some of his regular writers, and Astounding was no longer regarded as the leader of the field, though it did continue to publish popular and influential stories: Hal Clement's novel Mission of Gravity appeared in 1953, and Tom Godwin's "The Cold Equations" appeared the following year.
While there he wrote his first published story, "Proof", which appeared in the June 1942 issue of Astounding Science Fiction, edited by John W. Campbell; three more appeared in later 1942 numbers.

Stanley Schmidt

Stan SchmidtStanley Schmidt’s
Bova was followed by Stanley Schmidt, who continued to publish many of the same authors who had been contributing for years; the result was some criticism of the magazine as stagnant and dull, though Schmidt was initially successful in maintaining circulation.
Between 1978 and 2012 he served as editor of Analog Science Fiction and Fact magazine.

Isaac Asimov

AsimovAsimov, IsaacLight Verse
Over the next few years Campbell published many stories that became classics in the field, including Isaac Asimov's Foundation series, A. E. van Vogt's Slan, and several novels and stories by Robert A. Heinlein.
On 17 May 1938, puzzled by a change in the schedule of Astounding Science Fiction, Asimov visited its publisher Street & Smith Publications.

The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction

F&SFFantasy and Science FictionFantasy & Science Fiction
By 1950, new competition had appeared from Galaxy Science Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Campbell's interest in some pseudo-science topics, such as Dianetics (an early version of Scientology), alienated some of his regular writers, and Astounding was no longer regarded as the leader of the field, though it did continue to publish popular and influential stories: Hal Clement's novel Mission of Gravity appeared in 1953, and Tom Godwin's "The Cold Equations" appeared the following year.
The pay rate for the early issues was two cents per word, or $100 for short pieces, which was competitive with Astounding Science Fiction, the leading sf magazine of the day.

Dianetics

Dianetic Research FoundationDianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Healthdianoetic
By 1950, new competition had appeared from Galaxy Science Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Campbell's interest in some pseudo-science topics, such as Dianetics (an early version of Scientology), alienated some of his regular writers, and Astounding was no longer regarded as the leader of the field, though it did continue to publish popular and influential stories: Hal Clement's novel Mission of Gravity appeared in 1953, and Tom Godwin's "The Cold Equations" appeared the following year.
The first publication on Dianetics was "Dianetics: The Evolution of a Science", an article by Hubbard in Astounding Science Fiction (cover date May 1950).

John W. Campbell

John W. Campbell, Jr.John W. Campbell Jr.John Campbell
The new editor was F. Orlin Tremaine, who soon made Astounding the leading magazine in the nascent pulp science fiction field, publishing well-regarded stories such as Jack Williamson's Legion of Space and John W. Campbell's "Twilight".
He was editor of Astounding Science Fiction (later called Analog Science Fiction and Fact) from late 1937 until his death and was part of the Golden Age of Science Fiction.

Jack Williamson

Will StewartWonder's Child: My Life in Science FictionWilliamson
The new editor was F. Orlin Tremaine, who soon made Astounding the leading magazine in the nascent pulp science fiction field, publishing well-regarded stories such as Jack Williamson's Legion of Space and John W. Campbell's "Twilight".
In the field of science, Jack Williamson coined the word terraforming in a science-fiction story published in 1942 in Astounding Science Fiction.

Galaxy Science Fiction

GalaxyGalaxy MagazineGalaxy'' magazine
By 1950, new competition had appeared from Galaxy Science Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Campbell's interest in some pseudo-science topics, such as Dianetics (an early version of Scientology), alienated some of his regular writers, and Astounding was no longer regarded as the leader of the field, though it did continue to publish popular and influential stories: Hal Clement's novel Mission of Gravity appeared in 1953, and Tom Godwin's "The Cold Equations" appeared the following year.
His editorial policy was broader than that of John W. Campbell, the editor of the leading magazine in the field, Astounding Science Fiction: Gold was interested in sociology, psychology, and other "soft" sciences, and was also willing to publish humorous and satirical stories.

Tom Godwin

Thomas GodwinTom Godwin (writer)
By 1950, new competition had appeared from Galaxy Science Fiction and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. Campbell's interest in some pseudo-science topics, such as Dianetics (an early version of Scientology), alienated some of his regular writers, and Astounding was no longer regarded as the leader of the field, though it did continue to publish popular and influential stories: Hal Clement's novel Mission of Gravity appeared in 1953, and Tom Godwin's "The Cold Equations" appeared the following year.

Digest size

digest-sizeddigestdigest format
Astounding returned to pulp-size in mid-1943 for six issues, and then became the first science fiction magazine to switch to digest size in November 1943, increasing the number of pages to maintain the same total wordcount.
The science fiction magazines Analog and Asimov's had switched to a format slightly larger than digest size several years earlier.

Poul Anderson

High TreasonAndersonA Knight of Ghosts and Shadows
Several well-known writers turned down the job; Poul Anderson did not want to leave California, and neither did Jerry Pournelle, who also felt the salary was too small.
While he was an undergraduate student at the University of Minnesota, Anderson's first stories were published by John W. Campbell in Astounding Science Fiction: "Tomorrow's Children" by Anderson and F. N. Waldrop in March 1947 and a sequel, "Chain of Logic" by Anderson alone, in July.

Donald Wandrei

Don Wandrei
Ashley describes the first, Nat Schachner's "Ancestral Voices", as "not amongst Schachner's best"; the second, "Colossus", by Donald Wandrei, was not a new idea, but was energetically written.
He had fourteen stories in Weird Tales, another sixteen in Astounding Stories, plus a few in other magazines including Esquire.

Dell Magazines

Dell
The title was sold to Davis Publications in 1980, then to Dell Magazines in 1992.
Dell is today known for its many puzzle magazines, astrology magazines, as well as fiction magazines such as Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, Asimov's Science Fiction, and Analog Science Fiction and Fact.