Ancient Greek personal names

Ancient Greeks generally had a single nameGreek namenicknamethe name
The study of ancient Greek personal names is a branch of onomastics, the study of names, and more specifically of anthroponomastics, the study of names of persons.wikipedia
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Greek name

GreekGreek surnameGreek surnames
There are hundreds of thousands and even millions of Greek names on record, making them an important resource for any general study of naming, as well as for the study of ancient Greece itself.
Ancient Greeks generally had a single name, often qualified with a patronymic, a clan or tribe, or a place of origin.

Onomastics

onomasticonomasticianonomatologist
The study of ancient Greek personal names is a branch of onomastics, the study of names, and more specifically of anthroponomastics, the study of names of persons.
Ancient Greek personal names

Anthroponymy

anthroponymanthroponymicanthroponomastics
The study of ancient Greek personal names is a branch of onomastics, the study of names, and more specifically of anthroponomastics, the study of names of persons.
Ancient Greek personal names

Elaine Matthews

E. Matthews
Several volumes of studies have been published that build on the new foundation created by these comprehensive collections: S. Hornblower and E. Matthews (2000);
In 2010, after she had retired, she was the dedicatee of a Festschrift on Ancient Greek personal names in honour of her distinguished career, containing a collection of scholarly essays on Greek onomastics but with an appreciation of Matthews as a scholar by Alan Bowman as its first chapter.

Amphora

amphoraeneck amphoraamphoras
The names are found in literary texts, on coins and stamped amphora handles, on potsherds used in ostracisms, and, much more abundantly, in inscriptions and (in Egypt) on papyri.

Ostracism

ostracizedostracisedostracise
The names are found in literary texts, on coins and stamped amphora handles, on potsherds used in ostracisms, and, much more abundantly, in inscriptions and (in Egypt) on papyri.

Ancient Egypt

EgyptEgyptianEgyptians
The names are found in literary texts, on coins and stamped amphora handles, on potsherds used in ostracisms, and, much more abundantly, in inscriptions and (in Egypt) on papyri.

Papyrus

papyripapyriformchartatabidum
The names are found in literary texts, on coins and stamped amphora handles, on potsherds used in ostracisms, and, much more abundantly, in inscriptions and (in Egypt) on papyri.

Ancient Greece

Greekancient Greekancient Greeks
There are hundreds of thousands and even millions of Greek names on record, making them an important resource for any general study of naming, as well as for the study of ancient Greece itself. Ancient Greeks usually had one name, but another element was often added in semi-official contexts or to aid identification: a father’s name (patronym) in the genitive case, or in some regions as an adjectival formulation.

Patronymic

patronymibnbin
Ancient Greeks usually had one name, but another element was often added in semi-official contexts or to aid identification: a father’s name (patronym) in the genitive case, or in some regions as an adjectival formulation.

Genitive case

genitivegen.GEN
Ancient Greeks usually had one name, but another element was often added in semi-official contexts or to aid identification: a father’s name (patronym) in the genitive case, or in some regions as an adjectival formulation.

Demosthenes

Démosthène Demosthenes Demosthenem
Thus the orator Demosthenes, while proposing decrees in the Athenian assembly, was known as "Demosthenes, son of Demosthenes of Paiania"; Paiania was the deme or regional sub-unit of Attica to which he belonged by birth.

Ecclesia (ancient Athens)

ecclesiaAssemblyEkklesia
Thus the orator Demosthenes, while proposing decrees in the Athenian assembly, was known as "Demosthenes, son of Demosthenes of Paiania"; Paiania was the deme or regional sub-unit of Attica to which he belonged by birth.

Paiania

Thus the orator Demosthenes, while proposing decrees in the Athenian assembly, was known as "Demosthenes, son of Demosthenes of Paiania"; Paiania was the deme or regional sub-unit of Attica to which he belonged by birth.

Deme

demoidemesdemos
Thus the orator Demosthenes, while proposing decrees in the Athenian assembly, was known as "Demosthenes, son of Demosthenes of Paiania"; Paiania was the deme or regional sub-unit of Attica to which he belonged by birth.

Attica

AtticAthensAttiki
Thus the orator Demosthenes, while proposing decrees in the Athenian assembly, was known as "Demosthenes, son of Demosthenes of Paiania"; Paiania was the deme or regional sub-unit of Attica to which he belonged by birth.

Abraham Lincoln

LincolnPresident LincolnPresident Abraham Lincoln
If Americans used that system, Abraham Lincoln would have been called "Abraham, son of Thomas of Kentucky" (where he was born).

Proto-Indo-European language

Proto-Indo-EuropeanIndo-EuropeanPIE
Demosthenes is compounded from two ordinary Greek roots (a structure at least as old as proto-Indo-European): demos "people" and sthenos "strength".

Hypocorism

hypocoristicpet namepet form
A second major category of names was shortened versions ("hypocoristics," or in German Kosenamen) of the compounded names.

Aeschylus

ÆschylusAischylosAeschylean
For instance, some twenty different names are formed from aischros "ugly", including that of the poet we know as Aeschylus, the Latin spelling of Aischylos.

Phrygia

PhrygianPhrygia PacatianaPhrygia Pacatiana Prima
They grew hugely in frequency from a low base in the Roman period, probably through the influence of other naming traditions such as Phrygian, in which such names were very common.

Indo-European languages

Indo-EuropeanIndo-European languageIndo-European language family
The main broad characteristics of Greek name formation listed above are found in other Indo-European languages (the Indo-Iranian, Germanic, Celtic, Baltic, and Slavic subgroups); they look like an ancient inheritance within Greek.

Linear B

Linear B SyllabaryLinear B tabletsMycenaean script
The naming practices of the Mycenaeans in the 14th/13th centuries BC, insofar as they can be reconstructed from the early Greek known as Linear B, seem already to display most of the characteristics of the system visible when literacy resumed in the 8th century BC, though non-Greek names were also present.

Macedonia (Greece)

MacedoniaGreek MacedoniaMacedonian
The system described above underwent few changes before the Roman period, though the rise of Macedonia to power earned names of that region such as Ptolemaios, Berenike, and Arsinoe new popularity.

Roman citizenship

Roman citizensRoman citizencitizens
The influence of Rome is certainly visible both in the adoption of Roman names by Greeks and in the drastic transformation of names by Greeks who acquired Roman citizenship, a status marked by possession of not one but three names.