Ancient Olympic Games

Olympic GamesOlympicOlympicsOlympiadAncient Olympicsancient OlympicOlympian GamesancientOlympianAncient Greek Olympics
The ancient Olympic Games were originally a festival, or celebration, of and for Zeus; events such as a footrace, a javelin contest, and wrestling matches were added later.wikipedia
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Olympic Games

OlympicOlympicsOlympian
The Olympic Games (, Olympia, "the Olympics"; also Ὀλυμπιάς, Olympias, "the Olympiad") were a series of athletic competitions among representatives of city-states and one of the Panhellenic Games of ancient Greece. The games were always held at Olympia rather than moving between different locations as is the practice with the modern Olympic Games. Pierre de Coubertin, one of the founders of the modern Olympic Games, wanted to fully imitate the ancient Olympics in every way.
Their creation was inspired by the ancient Olympic Games, which were held in Olympia, Greece, from the 8th century BC to the 4th century AD.

Sport of athletics

Athleticsathleteathletic
The Olympic Games (, Olympia, "the Olympics"; also Ὀλυμπιάς, Olympias, "the Olympiad") were a series of athletic competitions among representatives of city-states and one of the Panhellenic Games of ancient Greece.
Organized athletics are traced back to the Ancient Olympic Games from 776 BC.

Panhellenic Games

Panhellenic FestivalsathleteGame
The Olympic Games (, Olympia, "the Olympics"; also Ὀλυμπιάς, Olympias, "the Olympiad") were a series of athletic competitions among representatives of city-states and one of the Panhellenic Games of ancient Greece.

Olympiad

Cultural OlympiadOlympiadsfour years
The games were held every four years, or olympiad, which became a unit of time in historical chronologies.
An Olympiad (Ὀλυμπιάς, Olympiás) is a period of four years associated with the Olympic Games of the Ancient Greeks.

Olive wreath

kotinoscrown of olive leavesolive leaf wreaths
The prizes for the victors were olive leaf wreaths or crowns.
The Olive wreath also known as kotinos, was the prize for the winner at the ancient Olympic Games.

Theodosius I

TheodosiusTheodosius the GreatEmperor Theodosius
They continued to be celebrated when Greece came under Roman rule, until the emperor Theodosius I suppressed them in AD393 as part of the campaign to impose Christianity as the State religion of Rome.
In 393, he banned the pagan rituals of the Olympics in Ancient Greece.

Olympic Truce

Olympic Truce Foundationceasing hostilities during the Ancient Olympic Gamespeaceful and better world through sport
During the celebration of the games, an Olympic Truce was enacted so that athletes could travel from their cities to the games in safety.
A "truce" (Ancient Greek: ékécheiria, meaning "laying down of arms") was announced before and during the Olympic Games to ensure the host city state (Elis) was not attacked and athletes and spectators could travel safely to the Games and peacefully return to their respective countries.

Hellanodikai

Olympic judgesHellanodicaeHellanodíkai
As long as they met the entrance criteria, athletes from any Greek city-state and kingdom were allowed to participate, although the Hellanodikai, the officials in charge, allowed king Alexander I of Macedon to participate in the games only after he had proven his Greek ancestry.
Ἑλλανοδίκας ) were the judges of the Ancient Olympic Games, and the success of the games are attributed to their efforts.

Statue of Zeus at Olympia

statue of ZeusZeusOlympian Zeus
The statue of Zeus at Olympia was counted as one of the seven wonders of the ancient world.
The statue of Zeus was commissioned by the Eleans, custodians of the Olympic Games, in the latter half of the fifth century BC for their newly constructed Temple of Zeus.

Pelops

PelopidsPoseidon and PelopsPelopid
He was venerated at Olympia, where his cult developed into the founding myth of the Olympic Games, the most important expression of unity, not only for the Peloponnesus, "island of Pelops", but for all Hellenes.

Olympia, Greece

OlympiaAncient OlympiaAltis
The games were always held at Olympia rather than moving between different locations as is the practice with the modern Olympic Games.
Olympia (Greek: Ὀλυμπία; ; Olymbía), is a small town in Elis on the Peloponnese peninsula in Greece, famous for the nearby archaeological site of the same name, which was a major Panhellenic religious sanctuary of ancient Greece, where the ancient Olympic Games were held.

Funeral games

funerary gamesfunerary ship race
It was often supposed that the origins of many aspects of the Olympics date to funeral games of the Mycenean period and later.
Many of the contests were similar to those held at the Olympic Games, and although those were held in honor of Zeus, many scholars see the origin of Olympic competition in these earlier funeral games.

Pisa, Greece

PisaPisatisArchaia Pisa
The games first started in Olympia, Greece, in a sanctuary site for the Greek deities near the towns of Elis and Pisa (both in Elis on the peninsula of Peloponnesos).
Pisa was a town in Peloponnesus, that was in the most ancient times the capital of an independent district, called Pisatis, which included Olympia, the site of the Ancient Olympic Games, and Dyspontium.

Nemean Games

NemeanNemea
The Olympic Games were more important and more prestigious than the Pythian, Nemean, and Isthmian Games.
With the Isthmian Games, the Nemean Games were held both the year before and the year after the Ancient Olympic Games and the Pythian Games in the third year of the Olympiad cycle.

Pythian Games

PythianPythiaDelphic Games
The Olympic Games were more important and more prestigious than the Pythian, Nemean, and Isthmian Games.
They were held two years after each Olympic Games, and between each Nemean and Isthmian Games.

Elis

ancient ElisEleanEleans
The games first started in Olympia, Greece, in a sanctuary site for the Greek deities near the towns of Elis and Pisa (both in Elis on the peninsula of Peloponnesos).
Elis held authority over the site of Olympia and the Olympic games.

Alexander I of Macedon

Alexander IAlexanderAlexander I, king of Macedonia
As long as they met the entrance criteria, athletes from any Greek city-state and kingdom were allowed to participate, although the Hellanodikai, the officials in charge, allowed king Alexander I of Macedon to participate in the games only after he had proven his Greek ancestry.
After a court of Elean hellanodikai determined his claim to be true, he was permitted to participate in the Olympic Games possibly in 504 BC, an honour reserved only for Greeks.

Isthmian Games

IsthmianIsthmia
The Olympic Games were more important and more prestigious than the Pythian, Nemean, and Isthmian Games.
As with the Nemean Games, the Isthmian Games were held both the year before and the year after the Olympic Games (the second and fourth years of an Olympiad), while the Pythian Games were held in the third year of the Olympiad cycle.

Pindar

PindaricPindarusancient Greek poet
His victory odes are grouped into four books named after the Olympian, Pythian, Isthmian, and Nemean Games – Panhellenic festivals held respectively at Olympia, Delphi, Corinth and Nemea.

Greeks

GreekHellenesGreek people
Thus, Hellenic culture and the games spread while the primacy of Olympia persisted.
According to some scholars, the foundational event was the Olympic Games in 776 BC, when the idea of a common Hellenism among the Greek tribes was first translated into a shared cultural experience and Hellenism was primarily a matter of common culture.

Ancient Olympic pentathlon

Pentathlonancient Greek pentathlonancient pentathlon
The Ancient Olympic pentathlon was an athletic contest at the Ancient Olympic Games, and other Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece.

Pankration

pankratiastpancrationpancratium
The pankration was introduced in the 33rd Olympiad (648 BC).
Pankration was a sporting event introduced into the Greek Olympic Games in 648 BC and was an empty-hand submission sport with scarcely any rules.

Stadion (running race)

stadionstadion racestade
The only competition held then was, according to the later Greek traveller Pausanias who wrote in AD175, the stadion race, a race over about 190 m, measured after the feet of Hercules.
Stadion or stade was an ancient running event, part of the Ancient Olympic Games and the other Panhellenic Games.

Pierre de Coubertin

Baron Pierre de CoubertinBaron de CoubertinCoubertin
Pierre de Coubertin, one of the founders of the modern Olympic Games, wanted to fully imitate the ancient Olympics in every way.
The failure of this endeavour, however, was closely followed by the development of a new idea, the revival of the ancient Olympic Games, the creation of a festival of international athleticism.

Oenomaus

Oinomaos
Oenomaus' chariot race was one legendary origin of the Olympic Games; one of its turning-posts was preserved, and round it grew an Elean legend of a burnt "house of Oenomaus", reported by Pausanias in the 2nd century CE.