André Le Nôtrewikipedia
André Le Nôtre (12 March 1613 – 15 September 1700), originally rendered as André Le Nostre, was a French landscape architect and the principal gardener of King Louis XIV of France.
Le NôtreAndré Le NôtreLe NotreLe NostreAndre Le Nôtre

Louis XIV of France

Louis XIVKing Louis XIVKing Louis XIV’s
André Le Nôtre (12 March 1613 – 15 September 1700), originally rendered as André Le Nostre, was a French landscape architect and the principal gardener of King Louis XIV of France.
Louis encouraged and benefited from the work of prominent political, military, and cultural figures such as Mazarin, Colbert, Louvois, the Grand Condé, Turenne, Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban, André Charles Boulle, Molière, Racine, Boileau, La Fontaine, Lully, Marais, Le Brun, Rigaud, Bossuet, Le Vau, Mansart, Charles, Claude Perrault, and Le Nôtre.

Gardens of Versailles

gardens of VersaillesVersaillesgardens
Most notably, he was the landscape architect who designed the park of the Palace of Versailles, and his work represents the height of the French formal garden style, or jardin à la française.
Situated to the west of the palace, the gardens cover some 800 hectares of land, much of which is landscaped in the classic French Garden style perfected here by André Le Nôtre.

French formal garden

garden à la françaisejardin à la françaiseFrench garden
Most notably, he was the landscape architect who designed the park of the Palace of Versailles, and his work represents the height of the French formal garden style, or jardin à la française.
Its epitome is generally considered to be the Gardens of Versailles designed during the 17th century by the landscape architect André Le Nôtre for Louis XIV and widely copied by other European courts.

Palace of Versailles

VersaillesChâteau de Versaillespalace of Versailles
Most notably, he was the landscape architect who designed the park of the Palace of Versailles, and his work represents the height of the French formal garden style, or jardin à la française.
The palace is now a Monument historique and UNESCO World Heritage site, notable especially for the ceremonial Hall of Mirrors, the jewel-like Royal Opera, and the royal apartments; for the more intimate royal residences, the Grand Trianon and Petit Trianon located within the park; the small rustic Hameau (Hamlet) created for Marie Antoinette; and the vast Gardens of Versailles with fountains, canals, and geometric flower beds and groves, laid out by André le Nôtre.

Vaux-le-Vicomte

Château de Vaux-le-VicomteVauxfamous country house
Prior to working on Versailles, Le Nôtre collaborated with Louis Le Vau and Charles Le Brun on the park at Vaux-le-Vicomte.
At Vaux-le-Vicomte, the architect Louis Le Vau, the landscape architect André le Nôtre, and the painter-decorator Charles Le Brun worked together on a large-scale project for the first time.

Tuileries Palace

Tuileriespalais des TuileriesTuileries Gardens
His contribution to planning was also significant: at the Tuileries he extended the westward vista, which later became the avenue of the Champs-Élysées and comprise the Axe historique.
At the same time, Louis' gardener, André Le Nôtre, redesigned the Tuileries gardens.

Palace of Fontainebleau

Fontainebleauchâteau de Fontainebleaupalace of Fontainebleau
His other works include the design of gardens and parks at Chantilly, Fontainebleau, Saint-Cloud and Saint-Germain.
He did make major changes in the park and gardens; he commissioned André Le Nôtre and Louis Le Vau to redesign the large parterre into a French formal garden.

Champs-Élysées

Avenue des Champs-ÉlyséesChamps-ElyséesChamps-Élysées
His contribution to planning was also significant: at the Tuileries he extended the westward vista, which later became the avenue of the Champs-Élysées and comprise the Axe historique.
The Champs-Élysées and its gardens were originally laid out in 1667 by André Le Nôtre as an extension of the Tuileries Garden, the gardens of the Tuileries Palace, which had been built in 1564, and which Le Nôtre had rebuilt in his own formal style for Louis XIV in 1664.

Louis Le Vau

Louis Le VauLe VauLe Vau’s
Prior to working on Versailles, Le Nôtre collaborated with Louis Le Vau and Charles Le Brun on the park at Vaux-le-Vicomte.
He was responsible, with André Le Nôtre and Charles Le Brun, for the redesign of the château of Vaux-le-Vicomte.

Château de Sceaux

château de SceauxSceauxmusée de l'Île-de-France
Colbert commissioned Le Nôtre in 1670, to alter the gardens of his own château de Sceaux, which was ongoing until 1683.
Located in a park laid out by André Le Nôtre, visitors can tour the house, outbuildings and gardens.

Château de Saint-Cloud

Saint-Cloudchâteau de Saint-CloudSt. Cloud
His other works include the design of gardens and parks at Chantilly, Fontainebleau, Saint-Cloud and Saint-Germain.
The gardens were replanned by André Le Nôtre, and the park took on the dimensions it retains today.

Nicolas Fouquet

FouquetNicolas FouquetSuperintendent Fouquet
André Le Nôtre's first major garden design was undertaken for Nicolas Fouquet, Louis XIV's Superintendent of Finances.
He had spent enormous sums in building a magnificent château on his estate of Vaux-le-Vicomte, which in extent, magnificence and splendour of decoration was a forerunner of the Palace of Versailles and where he brought together three artists that the King would later take up for Versailles: the architect Louis Le Vau, the painter Charles Le Brun, and the garden designer André le Nôtre.

Château de Meudon

Meudonchâteau de Meudoncastle of Meudon
Between 1679 and 1691, he was involved in the planning of the gardens of Château de Meudon for François-Michel le Tellier, Marquis de Louvois.
The parterre of M. Le Nostre, in the middle, in front of the cave that I have drawn, is very nice, so the two "embroidery" in the center in front of the house, with two vases Marble and marble statues around the oval basin, hand-built as tiles did not do a bad effect.

Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye

Saint-GermainSaint-Germain-en-LayeSt. Germain
His other works include the design of gardens and parks at Chantilly, Fontainebleau, Saint-Cloud and Saint-Germain.
these new gardens extended the central axis of a symmetrical building façade in rigorously symmetrical axial designs of patterned parterres, gravel walks, fountains and basins, and formally planted bosquets; they began the tradition that reached its apex after 1650 in the gardens of André Le Nôtre.

Château de Chantilly

Chantillychâteau de ChantillyMusée Condé
His other works include the design of gardens and parks at Chantilly, Fontainebleau, Saint-Cloud and Saint-Germain.
The main French formal garden, featuring extensive parterres and water features, was laid out principally by André Le Nôtre for the Grand Condé.

French landscape garden

jardins paysagersFrench landscape stylerustic garden constructions built at the time
Signs of a new, more natural style were seen in the design of the bousquet des Sources at the Trianon, created by André Le Nôtre, and in the bousquets of the Château de Marly, created by Hardouin-Mansart.

Saint-Roch, Paris

Église Saint-RochSaint-RochChurch of Saint-Roch
André was born on 12 March 1613, and was baptised at the Église Saint-Roch.
Notable tombs in the church include those of Denis Diderot, the Comte de Grasse, the Baron d'Holbach, Henri de Lorraine-Harcourt, Pierre Corneille, André le Nôtre, Marie Anne de Bourbon (daughter of Louis XIV) and Marie-Thérèse Rodet Geoffrin.

A Little Chaos

André Le Nôtre was played by Matthias Schoenaerts in the 2015 film A Little Chaos, directed by Alan Rickman.
King Louis XIV of France assigns the design and construction of the Gardens of Versailles to André Le Nôtre.

Capability Brown

Capability BrownLancelot "Capability" BrownCapability" Brown
His work has often been favorably compared and contrasted ("the antithesis") to the œuvre of Lancelot "Capability" Brown, the English landscape architect.
His work has often been favourably compared and contrasted ("the antithesis") to the œuvre of André Le Nôtre, the French jardin à la française landscape architect.

Versailles, Yvelines

VersaillesVersailles, FranceVersaille
Le Nôtre also laid out the radiating city plan of Versailles, which included the largest avenue yet seen in Europe, the Avenue de Paris.
Louis XIV commissioned his architect Le Vau and his landscape architect Le Nôtre to transform the castle of his father, as well as the park, in order to accommodate the court.

Château d'Issy

Issy
Denis Talon also commissioned the landscape architect André Le Nôtre to construct a collection of fountains for the garden, while Pierre Desgots, Le Nôtre's brother-in-law, would carry out work on the park.

Greenwich Park

Greenwich Royal ParkGreenreach
In 1662, he provided designs for Greenwich Park in London, for Charles II of England.
In the 17th century, the park was landscaped, possibly by André Le Nôtre who is known at least to have designed plans for it. The public were first allowed into the park during the 18th century.

Pierre Charles L'Enfant

Pierre (Peter) Charles L'EnfantPierre L'EnfantL'Enfant
In the following century, the Versailles design influenced Pierre Charles L'Enfant's master plan for Washington, D.C. See, L'Enfant Plan.
The work of André Le Nôtre, particularly his Gardens of Versailles, is said to have influenced L'Enfant's master plan for the capital.

Simon Vouet

VouetS. VouetSimon Vouet
He learned mathematics, painting and architecture, and entered the atelier of Simon Vouet, painter to Louis XIII, where he met and befriended the painter Charles Le Brun.
Also gardener André Le Nôtre, later a landsscape architect, studied in his studio.

17th-century French art

Louis XIV styleFrench Classicism17th-century French art
Architect Louis Le Vau, painter and designer Charles Le Brun and the landscape architect André Le Nôtre created marvels : fountains danced; wandering revelers discovered hidden grottos in the gardens.