Andrew Jackson

JacksonJacksonianPresident Andrew JacksonPresident JacksonGeneral Andrew JacksonJackson administrationGeneral JacksonElizabeth Hutchinson JacksonJacksonian EraAge of Jackson
Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845) was an American soldier and statesman who served as the seventh president of the United States from 1829 to 1837.wikipedia
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Seminole Wars

First Seminole WarThird Seminole WarSeminole War
Jackson then led U.S. forces in the First Seminole War, which led to the annexation of Florida from Spain.
During the Creek War (1813–1814), Colonel Andrew Jackson became a national hero after his victory over the Creek Red Sticks at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend.

Battle of New Orleans

New Orleansdefense of New Orleansattack on New Orleans
In the concurrent war against the British, Jackson's victory in 1815 at the Battle of New Orleans made him a national hero.
The Battle of New Orleans was fought on January 8, 1815 between the British Army under Major General Sir Edward Pakenham and the United States Army under Brevet Major General Andrew Jackson.

History of the United States Democratic Party

Democratic PartyDemocraticDemocrat
In reaction to the alleged "corrupt bargain" between Adams and Henry Clay and the ambitious agenda of President Adams, Jackson's supporters founded the Democratic Party.
During the Second Party System (from 1832 to the mid-1850s) under Presidents Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren and James K. Polk, the Democrats usually bested the opposition Whig Party by narrow margins.

John Quincy Adams

AdamsJohn QuincyJohn Q. Adams
As no candidate won an electoral majority, the House of Representatives elected John Quincy Adams in a contingent election.
The 1824 presidential election was contested by Adams, Andrew Jackson, William H. Crawford, and Henry Clay, all of whom were members of the Democratic-Republican Party.

Nullification Crisis

nullificationNullification ConventionNullification Crisis of 1832
The crisis was defused when the tariff was amended, and Jackson threatened the use of military force if South Carolina attempted to secede.
The Nullification Crisis was a United States sectional political crisis in 1832–33, during the presidency of Andrew Jackson, which involved a confrontation between the state of South Carolina and the federal government.

Bank War

conflict over the National Bankdestroy the institution by 1833dismantling
After a lengthy struggle, Jackson and his allies thoroughly dismantled the Bank.
The Bank War refers to the political struggle that developed over the issue of rechartering the Second Bank of the United States (B.U.S.) during the presidency of Andrew Jackson (1829–1837).

Indian Removal Act

Indian Removal Act of 1830Indian removalAmerican Indian Removal Policies
In 1830, Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, which forcibly relocated most members of the Native American tribes in the South to Indian Territory.
The Indian Removal Act was signed into law on May 28, 1830, by United States President Andrew Jackson.

1828 United States presidential election

18281828 presidential election1828 election
Jackson ran again in 1828, defeating Adams in a landslide.
It featured a re-match of the 1824 election, as President John Quincy Adams of the National Republican Party faced Andrew Jackson of the Democratic Party.

Henry Clay

ClayHenry Clay, Sr.Clay, Henry
In reaction to the alleged "corrupt bargain" between Adams and Henry Clay and the ambitious agenda of President Adams, Jackson's supporters founded the Democratic Party.
Despite receiving support from Clay and other National Republicans, Adams was defeated by Democrat Andrew Jackson in the 1828 presidential election.

Tariff of Abominations

Tariff of 1828Tariffs of 18281828
Jackson faced the threat of secession by South Carolina over what opponents called the "Tariff of Abominations."
Created during the presidency of John Quincy Adams and enacted during the presidency of Andrew Jackson, it was labeled the "Tariff of Abominations" by its Southern detractors because of the effects it had on the Southern economy.

1824 United States presidential election

18241824 presidential election1824 election
He ran for president in 1824, winning a plurality of the popular and electoral vote.
Senator Andrew Jackson, House Speaker Henry Clay, and Secretary of State Adams all joined Crawford in seeking the presidency, highlighting factionalism within the party and an end to the Era of Good Feelings.

Adams–Onís Treaty

Adams-Onís TreatyAdams-Onis TreatyAdams–Onis Treaty
Jackson then led U.S. forces in the First Seminole War, which led to the annexation of Florida from Spain.
While fighting escaped African-American slaves, outlaws, and Native Americans in U.S.-controlled Georgia during the First Seminole War, American General Andrew Jackson had pursued them into Spanish Florida.

Second Bank of the United States

Bank of the United Statesnational bankUnited States Bank
In Congress, Henry Clay led the effort to reauthorize the Second Bank of the United States.
The efforts to renew the bank's charter put the institution at the center of the general election of 1832, in which the bank's president Nicholas Biddle and pro-bank National Republicans led by Henry Clay clashed with the "hard-money" Andrew Jackson administration and eastern banking interests in the Bank War.

Florida

FLState of FloridaFloridian
Jackson then led U.S. forces in the First Seminole War, which led to the annexation of Florida from Spain.
The United States Army led increasingly frequent incursions into Spanish territory, including the 1817–1818 campaign against the Seminole Indians by Andrew Jackson that became known as the First Seminole War.

James K. Polk

James PolkJames Knox PolkPolk
In his retirement, Jackson remained active in Democratic Party politics, supporting the presidencies of Martin Van Buren and James K. Polk.
A protégé of Andrew Jackson, he was a member of the Democratic Party and an advocate of Jacksonian democracy.

Historical rankings of presidents of the United States

rankedpolls of historians and political scientistsrank
Surveys of historians and scholars have ranked Jackson favorably among U.S. presidents.
The remaining places within the Top 10 are often rounded out by Theodore Roosevelt, Thomas Jefferson, Harry S. Truman, Woodrow Wilson, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Andrew Jackson, and John F. Kennedy.

Force Bill

threatened
The crisis was defused when the tariff was amended, and Jackson threatened the use of military force if South Carolina attempted to secede.
Passed by Congress at the urging of President Andrew Jackson, the Force Bill consisted of eight sections expanding presidential power and was designed to compel the state of South Carolina's compliance with a series of federal tariffs, opposed by John C. Calhoun and other leading South Carolinians.

Rachel Jackson

RachelRachel DonelsonRachel Donelson Robards
Born in the colonial Carolinas to a Scotch-Irish family in the decade before the American Revolutionary War, Jackson became a frontier lawyer and married Rachel Donelson Robards.
Rachel Jackson (née Donelson; June 15, 1767 – December 22, 1828) was the wife of Andrew Jackson, the 7th President of the United States.

Waightstill Avery

Colonel Waightstill Avery
During his travel west, Jackson bought his first slave and in 1788, having been offended by fellow lawyer Waightstill Avery, fought his first duel.
He is noted for fighting a duel with future U.S. president Andrew Jackson in 1788.

Memphis, Tennessee

MemphisMemphis, TNMemphis Tennessee
He was one of the three original investors who founded Memphis, Tennessee, in 1819.
Modern Memphis was founded in 1819 by three prominent Americans: John Overton, James Winchester, and future president Andrew Jackson.

Indian Territory

Indian TerritoriesIndianIndian Country
In 1830, Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, which forcibly relocated most members of the Native American tribes in the South to Indian Territory.
Indian removal became the official policy of the United States government with the passage of the 1830 Indian Removal Act, formulated by President Andrew Jackson.

Trail of Tears

Trail of Tears National Historic TrailThe Trail of Tearsremoval
In 1830, Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, which forcibly relocated most members of the Native American tribes in the South to Indian Territory.
The removals, conducted under both Presidents Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren, followed the Indian Removal Act of 1830, which provided the president with powers to exchange land with Native tribes and provide infrastructure improvements on the existing lands.

John Overton (judge)

John OvertonJohn
In 1794, Jackson formed a partnership with fellow lawyer John Overton, dealing in claims for land reserved by treaty for the Cherokee and Chickasaw.
John Overton (April 9, 1766 – April 12, 1833) was an American planter, advisor of Andrew Jackson, a judge at the Superior Court of Tennessee, a banker and political leader.

Contingent election

electno candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the electiontie-breaker by the United States House of Representatives
As no candidate won an electoral majority, the House of Representatives elected John Quincy Adams in a contingent election.
In 1824, the presence of four candidates split the Electoral College, and Andrew Jackson lost the contingent election to John Quincy Adams despite winning a plurality of both the popular and electoral vote.

Archibald Roane

On February 5, Governor Archibald Roane broke the tie in Jackson's favor.
He quickly became caught up in the growing rivalry between Sevier and Andrew Jackson, and was soundly defeated by Sevier after just one term.