Andrew Johnson

JohnsonPresident Andrew JohnsonPresident JohnsonA. JohnsonJohnson administrationDeath of Andrew JohnsonJohnson, Andrew17th President of the United StatesAndrewHenry-mandering
Andrew Johnson (December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875) was the 17th president of the United States, serving from 1865 to 1869.wikipedia
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Reconstruction era

ReconstructionpostbellumCongressional Reconstruction
Johnson implemented his own form of Presidential Reconstruction – a series of proclamations directing the seceded states to hold conventions and elections to reform their civil governments.
When President Abraham Lincoln, a Republican, was assassinated at the end of the Civil War, Vice President Andrew Johnson, a Democrat from Tennessee and former slave holder, became President.

Jacob Johnson (father of Andrew Johnson)

Jacob Johnson
Andrew Johnson was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, on December 29, 1808, to Jacob Johnson (1778–1812) and Mary ("Polly") McDonough (1783–1856), a laundress.
Jacob Johnson (April 17, 1778 – January 4, 1812) was the father of Andrew Johnson, the 17th President of the United States.

Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Fourteenth Amendment14th AmendmentFourteenth
Johnson opposed the Fourteenth Amendment, which gave citizenship to former slaves.
Although strongly urged by moderates in Congress to sign the bill, President Andrew Johnson vetoed it on March 27, 1866.

Homestead Acts

Homestead ActhomesteadersHomestead Act of 1862
In his congressional service, he sought passage of the Homestead Bill, which was enacted soon after he left his Senate seat in 1862.
Its leading advocates were Andrew Johnson, George Henry Evans and Horace Greeley.

Raleigh, North Carolina

RaleighRaleigh, NCRaleigh, N.C.
Andrew Johnson was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, on December 29, 1808, to Jacob Johnson (1778–1812) and Mary ("Polly") McDonough (1783–1856), a laundress. Johnson was born in poverty in Raleigh, North Carolina, and never attended school.
In 1808, Andrew Johnson, the nation's future 17th President, was born at Casso's Inn in Raleigh.

Governor of Tennessee

GovernorTennessee GovernorMilitary Governor of Tennessee
He became Governor of Tennessee for four years, and was elected by the legislature to the U.S. Senate in 1857.
Andrew Johnson was the 17th president of the United States following Abraham Lincoln's assassination.

Greeneville, Tennessee

GreenevilleGreenville, TennesseeGreeneville, TN
Apprenticed as a tailor, he worked in several frontier towns before settling in Greeneville, Tennessee.
Greeneville is notable as the town where United States President Andrew Johnson began his political career when elected from his trade as a tailor.

Historical rankings of presidents of the United States

rankedpolls of historians and political scientistsrank
He is regarded by many historians as one of the worst presidents in American history.
The bottom 10 often include James Buchanan, Warren G. Harding, Andrew Johnson, Franklin Pierce, Millard Fillmore, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, Ulysses S. Grant, Zachary Taylor, George W. Bush, and/or Donald Trump.

Martha Johnson Patterson

MarthaMartha Johnson
The Johnsons were married for almost 50 years and had five children: Martha (1828), Charles (1830), Mary (1832), Robert (1834), and Andrew Jr. (1852).
Martha Johnson Patterson (October 25, 1828—July 10, 1901) was the eldest child of Andrew Johnson, the 17th President of the United States and his wife, Eliza McCardle.

Tenure of Office Act (1867)

Tenure of Office Act1867Tenure of Office Bill
As the conflict between the branches of government grew, Congress passed the Tenure of Office Act, restricting Johnson's ability to fire Cabinet officials.
The law was enacted on March 2, 1867, over the veto of United States President Andrew Johnson.

Laurens, South Carolina

LaurensLaurens, SCLaurensville
Fearing he would be arrested and returned to Raleigh, Johnson moved to Laurens, South Carolina.
Andrew Johnson, 17th President of the United States, worked as a tailor in downtown Laurens from 1824 until 1826.

Eliza McCardle Johnson

Eliza JohnsonEliza McCardle
In 1827, at the age of 18, he married 16-year-old Eliza McCardle, the daughter of a local shoemaker.
Eliza Johnson (née McCardle; October 4, 1810 – January 15, 1876) was the First Lady of the United States, the Second Lady of the United States, and the wife of Andrew Johnson, the 17th President of the United States.

Confederate States of America

ConfederateConfederacyConfederate States
As Southern slave states, including Tennessee, seceded to form the Confederate States of America, Johnson remained firmly with the Union.
Unionists, led by Parson Brownlow and Senator Andrew Johnson, took control of eastern Tennessee in 1863.

War Democrat

War DemocratsUnion Dem.anti-secession Democrats
In 1864, Johnson, as a War Democrat and Southern Unionist, was a logical choice as running mate for Lincoln, who wished to send a message of national unity in his reelection campaign; their ticket easily won. Lincoln considered several War Democrats for the ticket in 1864, and sent an agent to sound out General Benjamin Butler as a possible running mate.
The National Union Party nominated the incumbent President and "former" Republican Lincoln for President and former War Democrat Andrew Johnson for Vice President.

Freedmen's Bureau

Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned LandsFreedman's BureauFreedmens Bureau
Sam became a commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau and was known for being a proud man who negotiated the nature of his work with the Johnson family.
U.S. President Andrew Johnson, a southern Democrat who had succeeded to the office following Lincoln's assassination, vetoed the bill because he believed that it encroached on states' rights, relied inappropriately on the military in peacetime, and would prevent freed slaves from becoming independent by offering too much assistance.

Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
In his first term in the legislature, which met in the state capital of Nashville, Johnson did not consistently vote with either the Democratic or the newly formed Whig Party, though he revered President Andrew Jackson, a Democrat and fellow Tennessean.
Most War Democrats rallied to Republican President Abraham Lincoln and the Republicans' National Union Party in the election of 1864, which featured Andrew Johnson on the Republican ticket even though he was a Democrat from the South.

William Gannaway Brownlow

William G. BrownlowWilliam "Parson" BrownlowWilliam G. "Parson" Brownlow
He won a second term in 1845 against William G. Brownlow, presenting himself as the defender of the poor against the aristocracy.
He joined the Radical Republicans and spent much of his term opposing the policies of his longtime political foe Andrew Johnson.

Mooresville, Alabama

Mooresville
After a brief period in Knoxville, he moved to Mooresville, Alabama.
Andrew Johnson, later to become to 17th president of the United States, lived in Mooresville as an apprentice tailor when he was a young man.

John C. Breckinridge

BreckinridgeJohn Cabell BreckinridgeJohn Breckinridge
Though he was not impressed by either, Johnson campaigned for Buchanan and his running mate, John C. Breckinridge, who were elected.
When President Andrew Johnson extended amnesty to all former Confederates in 1868, Breckinridge returned to Kentucky, but resisted all encouragement to resume his political career.

Benjamin Butler

Benjamin F. ButlerBenjamin Franklin ButlerButler
Lincoln considered several War Democrats for the ticket in 1864, and sent an agent to sound out General Benjamin Butler as a possible running mate.
Born in New Hampshire and raised in Lowell, Massachusetts, Butler is best known as a political major general of the Union Army during the American Civil War, and for his leadership role in the impeachment of U.S. President Andrew Johnson.

Running mate

running-materunning matesrunning alongside
In 1864, Johnson, as a War Democrat and Southern Unionist, was a logical choice as running mate for Lincoln, who wished to send a message of national unity in his reelection campaign; their ticket easily won.
In 1864, in the interest of fostering national unity, Abraham Lincoln from the Republican Party (popular in the North) and Andrew Johnson of the Democratic Party (popular in the South) were co-endorsed and ran together for President and Vice-President as candidates of the National Union Party.

Annette Gordon-Reed

Annette Gordon ReedGordon-Reed, AnnetteReed, Annette Gordon
The readings caused a lifelong love of learning, and one of his biographers, Annette Gordon-Reed, suggests that Johnson, later a gifted public speaker, learned the art as he threaded needles and cut cloth.
Gordon-Reed's most recent book examines the US post-Civil War president Andrew Johnson and his historical reputation.

Scotch-Irish Americans

Scots-IrishScotch-IrishScotch-Irish American
He was of English, Scots-Irish, and Irish ancestry.

John Wilkes Booth

BoothJohn Wilkesfamous tragedian
That night, President Lincoln was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth, a Confederate sympathizer.
Booth and a group of co-conspirators originally plotted to kidnap Lincoln but later planned to kill him, Vice President Andrew Johnson, and Secretary of State William H. Seward in a bid to help the Confederacy's cause.

William H. Seward

William SewardWilliam Henry SewardSeward
Another factor was the desire of Secretary of State William Seward to frustrate the vice-presidential candidacy of his fellow New Yorker, former senator Daniel S. Dickinson, a War Democrat, as Seward would probably have had to yield his place if another New Yorker became vice president.
Seward remained in his post through the presidency of Andrew Johnson, during which he negotiated the Alaska Purchase in 1867 and supported Johnson during his impeachment.