Andrew Wakefield

Andrew Jeremy Wakefield (born 1957) is a discredited British ex-physician who became an anti-vaccine activist.wikipedia
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Autistic enterocolitis

withdrew their support
Most of Wakefield's co-authors then withdrew their support for the study's interpretations.
Autistic enterocolitis is the name of a nonexistent medical condition proposed by discredited British gastroenterologist Andrew Wakefield when he suggested a link between a number of common clinical symptoms and signs which he contended were distinctive to autism.

Vaccine hesitancy

anti-vaccinationanti-vaccinationistanti-vaccine
Andrew Jeremy Wakefield (born 1957) is a discredited British ex-physician who became an anti-vaccine activist.
Later 20th-century events included the 1982 broadcast of DPT: Vaccine Roulette, which sparked debate over the DPT vaccine, and the 1998 publication of a fraudulent academic article by Andrew Wakefield which sparked the MMR vaccine controversy.

The Lancet

LancetLancet OncologyThe Lancet Oncology
As a gastroenterologist at the Royal Free Hospital in London, he published a 1998 paper in The Lancet claiming a link between the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism.
The editor-in-chief, Richard Horton, went on the record to say the paper had "fatal conflicts of interest" because the study's lead author, Andrew Wakefield, had a serious conflict of interest that he had not declared to The Lancet.

Royal Free Hospital

Royal FreeThe Royal Free HospitalHampstead General Hospital
As a gastroenterologist at the Royal Free Hospital in London, he published a 1998 paper in The Lancet claiming a link between the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism.
In February 1998, the Royal Free held a press conference to coincide with the publication in The Lancet of a paper by Andrew Wakefield who claimed to have found a possible link between the MMR vaccine and autism.

Brian Deer

Other researchers were unable to reproduce Wakefield's findings, and a 2004 investigation by Sunday Times reporter Brian Deer identified undisclosed financial conflicts of interest on Wakefield's part. In November 2004, Channel 4 broadcast a one-hour Dispatches investigation by reporter Brian Deer; the Toronto Star said Deer had "produced documentary evidence that Wakefield applied for a patent on a single-jab measles vaccine before his campaign against the MMR vaccine, raising questions about his motives".
In a series of reports between 2004 and 2010, Deer investigated concerns over the MMR vaccine that arose with the publication in 1998 of a research paper in the medical journal The Lancet written by Andrew Wakefield, and his colleagues.

Johnson Center for Child Health and Development

Thoughtful House Thoughtful House Center for ChildrenThoughtful House Center for Children
Wakefield subsequently helped establish and served as the executive director of Thoughtful House Center for Children, which studies autism in Austin, Texas, where, according to The Times, he "continued to promote the theory of a link between the MMR vaccine and autism, despite admitting it was 'not proved'."
It was founded in 2005 by a group including discredited researcher Andrew Wakefield.

Autism spectrum

autism spectrum disorderautisticautism spectrum disorders
On 28 February 1998, Wakefield was the lead author of a study of twelve children with autism that was published in The Lancet.
In 1998 Andrew Wakefield led a fraudulent study that suggested that the MMR vaccine may cause autism.

MMR vaccine

MMRmeasles-mumps-rubella vaccineMMR vaccination
As a gastroenterologist at the Royal Free Hospital in London, he published a 1998 paper in The Lancet claiming a link between the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism.
In 1998 Andrew Wakefield et al. published a fraudulent paper about twelve children, reportedly with bowel symptoms and autism or other disorders acquired soon after administration of MMR vaccine, while supporting a competing vaccine.

The Sunday Times

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Other researchers were unable to reproduce Wakefield's findings, and a 2004 investigation by Sunday Times reporter Brian Deer identified undisclosed financial conflicts of interest on Wakefield's part.

Scientific misconduct

scientific fraudresearch misconductmisconduct
The British General Medical Council (GMC) conducted an inquiry into allegations of misconduct against Wakefield and two former colleagues, focusing on Deer's findings.
Andrew Wakefield, who claimed links between the MMR vaccine, autism and inflammatory bowel disease.

Dispatches (TV programme)

DispatchesChannel 4's ''DispatchesDispatches (TV series)
In November 2004, Channel 4 broadcast a one-hour Dispatches investigation by reporter Brian Deer; the Toronto Star said Deer had "produced documentary evidence that Wakefield applied for a patent on a single-jab measles vaccine before his campaign against the MMR vaccine, raising questions about his motives".
Broadcast on 18 November 2004, MMR: What they didn't tell you, featured an investigation by Sunday Times journalist Brian Deer into the campaign against the MMR vaccine by British surgeon Andrew Wakefield.

Science by press conference

hyperbolize study findingspress conferencemedia storm
This was later criticized as 'science by press conference'.

Jenny McCarthy

The Jenny McCarthy ShowAmy McCarthyJenny
He lives in the US where he has a following, including prominent celebrity anti-vaccinationist Jenny McCarthy, who wrote the foreword for Wakefield's autobiography, Callous Disregard.
McCarthy's claims that vaccines cause autism are not supported by any medical evidence, and the original paper by Andrew Wakefield that formed the basis for the claims (and for whose book McCarthy wrote a foreword) was based on manipulated data and fraudulent research.

St Mary's Hospital Medical School

St MarySt. Mary's Hospital Medical SchoolSt Mary's Medical School
After leaving the independent King Edward's School, Bath, Wakefield studied medicine at St Mary's Hospital Medical School (now Imperial College School of Medicine), fully qualifying in 1981.

King Edward's School, Bath

King Edward's SchoolBath Grammar SchoolKing Edward School
After leaving the independent King Edward's School, Bath, Wakefield studied medicine at St Mary's Hospital Medical School (now Imperial College School of Medicine), fully qualifying in 1981.

MMR vaccine and autism

MMR vaccine controversyMMR vaccinecontroversy
The fraudulent research paper authored by Andrew Wakefield and published in The Lancet claimed to link the vaccine to colitis and autism spectrum disorders.

Generation Rescue

J.B. Handley
J. B. Handley of the autism and anti-vaccine advocacy group Generation Rescue noted, "To our community, Andrew Wakefield is Nelson Mandela and Jesus Christ rolled up into one."
These conferences have also been criticized because Andrew Wakefield has spoken at them.

Epidemiology of measles

Disneyland measles outbreakmeasles outbreak2015 Disneyland outbreak
In February 2015, Wakefield denied that he bore any responsibility for the measles epidemic that started at Disneyland.
Around this time, Andrew Wakefield visited Minneapolis, teaming up with vaccine-skeptical groups to raise concerns about the MMR vaccine.

List of scientific misconduct incidents

Scientific plagiarism in the United States
* List of scientific misconduct incidents

Pigasus Award

PigasusUri trophy
On 1 April 2011, the James Randi Educational Foundation awarded Wakefield the Pigasus Award for "refusal to face reality".

Paul Offit

Paul A. OffitDr. Paul OffitOffit, Paul A., MD
Paul Offit did not agree, saying that the outbreak was "directly related to Dr. Wakefield's theory".
... [Offit] became outraged by Dr. Andrew Wakefield's 1998 study in the Lancet that blamed the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine for causing autism.

Autism

autisticautistic disorderautistic children
As a gastroenterologist at the Royal Free Hospital in London, he published a 1998 paper in The Lancet claiming a link between the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism.

Reproducibility

reproduciblereplicabilityreproduce
Other researchers were unable to reproduce Wakefield's findings, and a 2004 investigation by Sunday Times reporter Brian Deer identified undisclosed financial conflicts of interest on Wakefield's part.

Conflict of interest

conflicts of interestconflict-of-interestconflict of interests
Other researchers were unable to reproduce Wakefield's findings, and a 2004 investigation by Sunday Times reporter Brian Deer identified undisclosed financial conflicts of interest on Wakefield's part.

General Medical Council

GMCstruck offMedical Register
The British General Medical Council (GMC) conducted an inquiry into allegations of misconduct against Wakefield and two former colleagues, focusing on Deer's findings.