Anganamón

Anganamón (cropped)

Prominent war leader of the Mapuche during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries and a Toqui from .

- Anganamón

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Toqui

Title conferred by the Mapuche ( an indigenous Chilean and Argentinian people) on those chosen as leaders during times of war.

Toqui Lautaro, painting by Pedro Subercaseaux.
Probable standard of the Toqui, based on representations.

Anganamón was the first to mount his infantry to keep up with his fast-moving cavalry.

Battle of Curalaba

1598 battle and ambush where Mapuche people led by Pelantaru soundly defeated Spanish conquerors led by Martín García Óñez de Loyola at Curalaba, southern Chile.

Lautaro, hero of the Arauco war; Rayén Quitral outstanding soprano; Current Mapuche woman; Ceferino Namuncura blessed of the Catholic Church.

The Mapuche people, aware of their presence, with their cavalry led by Pelantaru and his lieutenants, Anganamón and Guaiquimilla, with three hundred men, shadowed his movements and made a surprise night raid.

Pelantaro

One of the vice toquis of Paillamachu, the toqui or military leader of the Mapuche people during the Mapuche uprising in 1598.

Statue of Pelantaro in the Site Museum of the Fort of Purén.

Pelantaro and his lieutenants Anganamon and Guaiquimilla were credited with the death of the second Spanish Governor of Chile, Martín García Óñez de Loyola, during the Battle of Curalaba on December 21, 1598.

Defensive War

Strategy and phase in the Arauco War between Spain and independent Mapuches.

Representation of the Martyrs of Elicura in an engraving within Histórica relación del Reyno de Chile i de las Misiones i Ministterios que exercita la Compañía de Jesús (1646), written by the Jesuit Alonso de Ovalle.

The Mapuche toqui Anganamón killed three Jesuit missionaries on December 14, 1612 after he learned the Spanish were protecting his two fugitive wives and two of his daughters.

Polygamy in Mapuche culture

Those that practise traditional polygamy.

Depiction of the ambush of the Martyrs of Elicura, who were slain in an incident triggered by the conflict between the Mapuche and Spanish settlers on the matter of polygamy.

Nevertheless, at the Parliament of Paicaví held between representatives of Spanish settlers and Mapuche tribes that same year, Valdivia ordered the detainment of the two wives and daughters of a toqui, Anganamón, on the basis of protecting them from polygamy.

Captaincy General of Chile

Territory of the Spanish Empire, from 1541 to 1818.

Map of the Captaincy General of Chile in 1796 and claimed territories
Illustration of the Arauco War in Jerónimo de Vivar's book Crónica y relación copiosa y verdadera de los reynos de Chile (1558).
Map of the Captaincy General of Chile in 1796 and claimed territories
"Baile del Santiago antiguo" by Pedro Subercaseaux. Chile's colonial high society were made up by landowners and government officials.
World Map by Abraham Ortelius (1570), where appears the Terra Australis Incognita.

A Mapuche revolt was triggered following the news of the battle of Curalaba on the 23 of December 1598, where the vice toqui Pelantaru and his lieutenants Anganamon and Guaiquimilla with three hundred men ambushed and killed the Spanish governor Martín García Óñez de Loyola and nearly all his companions.

Destruction of the Seven Cities

Term used in Chilean historiography to refer to the destruction or abandonment of seven major Spanish outposts in southern Chile around 1600 caused by the Mapuche and Huilliche uprising of 1598.

Settlements of the Conquistadores before the Destruction of the Seven Cities
Anganamón a key Mapuche leader in the Destruction of the Seven Cities. Image from the book Relación del viaje de Fray Diego de Ocaña por el Nuevo Mundo (1599-1605).

The revolt was triggered by the news of the Battle of Curalaba on 23 December 1598, where the vice toqui Pelantaru and his lieutenants, Anganamón and Guaiquimilla, with three hundred men ambushed and killed the Spanish governor Martín García Óñez de Loyola and nearly all his companions.

Mapuche history

Archaeological culture, the Mapuche people of southern Chile and Argentina have a long history which dates back to 600–500 BC. The Mapuche society underwent great transformations after Spanish contact in the mid–16th century.

Mocha Island off the coast of Arauco Peninsula, Chile
Reconstruction of a dalca in the museum of Dalcahue. This king of boats were used by both Chonos and the Mapuche of Chiloé (Cunco, Huilliche, Veliche). More northern Mapuche used simpler watercraft called wampu.
Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala's picture of the confrontation between the Mapuche (left) and the Inca Empire (right)
Mapuche graveyard
The llolle pictured is a traditional Mapuche fish trap.
Toki Lautaro, an early Mapuche military leader. Painting by Pedro Subercaseaux.
Settlements of the Conquistadores before the Destruction of the Seven Cities
Mapuches during a malón raid
Cornelio Saavedra Rodríguez in meeting with the main lonkos of Araucania in 1869
Vintage engraving of Mapuche
Composite of Mapuche activists killed in confrontations with the Chilean police in the 2000s

Luis de Valdivia took away warlord Anganamón's wives as the Catholic church opposed polygamy.