Statue of Pelantaro in the Site Museum of the Fort of Purén.
Anganamón (cropped)

Pelantaro and his lieutenants Anganamon and Guaiquimilla were credited with the death of the second Spanish Governor of Chile, Martín García Óñez de Loyola, during the Battle of Curalaba on December 21, 1598.

- Pelantaro

With Pelantaro and Aillavilú he fought a pitched battle with the troops of Governor Alonso García de Ramón in late 1609.

- Anganamón
Statue of Pelantaro in the Site Museum of the Fort of Purén.

2 related topics

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Lautaro, hero of the Arauco war; Rayén Quitral outstanding soprano; Current Mapuche woman; Ceferino Namuncura blessed of the Catholic Church.

Battle of Curalaba

Lautaro, hero of the Arauco war; Rayén Quitral outstanding soprano; Current Mapuche woman; Ceferino Namuncura blessed of the Catholic Church.

The Battle of Curalaba (Batalla de Curalaba ) is a 1598 battle and ambush where Mapuche people led by Pelantaru soundly defeated Spanish conquerors led by Martín García Óñez de Loyola at Curalaba, southern Chile.

The Mapuche people, aware of their presence, with their cavalry led by Pelantaru and his lieutenants, Anganamón and Guaiquimilla, with three hundred men, shadowed his movements and made a surprise night raid.

Toqui Lautaro, painting by Pedro Subercaseaux.

Toqui

Title conferred by the Mapuche ( an indigenous Chilean and Argentinian people) on those chosen as leaders during times of war.

Title conferred by the Mapuche ( an indigenous Chilean and Argentinian people) on those chosen as leaders during times of war.

Toqui Lautaro, painting by Pedro Subercaseaux.
Probable standard of the Toqui, based on representations.

Anganamón was the first to mount his infantry to keep up with his fast-moving cavalry.

The greatest of the Toqui was the older Paillamachu, who developed the strategy, patiently organized and trained his forces and then with his two younger Vice Toqui, Pelantaro and Millacolquin, carried out the Great Revolt of 1598–1604 which finally expelled the Spanish from Araucania.