Angkorwikipedia
Angkor (អង្គរ, "Capital City") was the capital city of the Khmer Empire, which also recognized as Yasodharapura (Khmer: យសោធរបុរៈ ;यशोधरपुर) and flourished from approximately the 9th to 15th centuries.
Angkor templesCambodiaAngkorpre-AngkorianAngkor periodAngkor KingdomAngkorian Empire

Yaśodharapura

Yashodharapura
Angkor (អង្គរ, "Capital City") was the capital city of the Khmer Empire, which also recognized as Yasodharapura (Khmer: យសោធរបុរៈ ;यशोधरपुर) and flourished from approximately the 9th to 15th centuries.
Yasodharapura (យសោធរបុរៈ; ; यशोधरपुर "Yaśōdharapura"), also known as Angkor, is a city that was the second capital of the Khmer Empire, established by King Yasovarman I in the late 9th century and centred on the temple of Phnom Bakheng.

Khmer architecture

Khmertemple mountaintemple-mountain
Many of the temples at Angkor have been restored, and together, they comprise the most significant site of Khmer architecture.
In Khmer architecture, the period of Angkor is the period in the history of the Khmer Empire from approximately the later half of the 8th century AD to the first half of the 15th century CE.

Khmer Empire

KhmerKhmer EmpireKhmer Kingdom
Angkor (អង្គរ, "Capital City") was the capital city of the Khmer Empire, which also recognized as Yasodharapura (Khmer: យសោធរបុរៈ ;यशोधरपुर) and flourished from approximately the 9th to 15th centuries.
Its greatest legacy is Angkor, in present-day Cambodia, which was the site of the capital city during the empire's zenith.

Angkor Wat

Angkormonument sitesConstruction of Angkor Wat
The city houses the magnificent Angkor Wat, one of Cambodia's popular tourist attractions.
It was built by the Khmer King Suryavarman II in the early 12th century in Yaśodharapura (យសោធរបុរៈ, present-day Angkor), the capital of the Khmer Empire, as his state temple and eventual mausoleum.

Khmer language

KhmerCambodianKhmer (Cambodian)
Angkor (អង្គរ, "Capital City") was the capital city of the Khmer Empire, which also recognized as Yasodharapura (Khmer: យសោធរបុរៈ ;यशोधरपुर) and flourished from approximately the 9th to 15th centuries.
It is also the earliest recorded and earliest written language of the Mon–Khmer family, predating Mon and by a significant margin Vietnamese, due to Old Khmer being the language of the historical empires of Chenla, Angkor and, presumably, their earlier predecessor state, Funan.

Siem Reap

Siem ReapSiemreap Special RegionSiĕm Réab
The ruins of Angkor are located amid forests and farmland north of the Great Lake (Tonlé Sap) and south of the Kulen Hills, near modern-day Siem Reap city (13°24′N, 103°51′E), in Siem Reap Province.
It is a popular resort town and a gateway to the Angkor region.

Longvek

LongvekLovek era
A Khmer rebellion against Siamese authority resulted in the 1431 sacking of Angkor by Ayutthaya, causing its population to migrate south to Longvek.
Lungvek or Lavek (លង្វែក or ល្វែក; meaning "intersection" or "crossroads") was a city in ancient Cambodia, the capital city of the country after the sacking of Angkor by the Siamese in 1431.

Jayavarman II

JayavarmanKing Jayavarman IIJayavarman II
The Angkorian period began in AD 802, when the Khmer Hindu monarch Jayavarman II declared himself a "universal monarch" and "god-king", and lasted until the late 14th century, first falling under Ayutthayan suzerainty in 1351. The Angkorian period may have begun shortly after 800 AD, when the Khmer King Jayavarman II announced the independence of Kambujadesa (Cambodia) from Java and established his capital of Hariharalaya (now known as Roluos) at the northern end of Tonlé Sap.
Jayavarman II is widely regarded as the king that set the foundation of the Angkor period in Cambodian history, beginning with the gradise consecration ritual conducted by Jayavarman II (reign 790-835) in 802 on sacred Mount Mahendraparvata, now known as Phnom Kulen, to celebrate the independence of Kambuja from Javanese dominion (presumably the "neighboring Chams", or chvea).

Cambodia

CambodiaKhmerKingdom of Cambodia
The Angkorian period may have begun shortly after 800 AD, when the Khmer King Jayavarman II announced the independence of Kambujadesa (Cambodia) from Java and established his capital of Hariharalaya (now known as Roluos) at the northern end of Tonlé Sap.
The Indianised kingdom facilitated the spread of first Hinduism and then Buddhism to much of Southeast Asia and undertook many religious infrastructural projects throughout the region, including the construction of more than 1,000 temples and monuments in Angkor alone.

Kbal Spean

Kbal Spean
Most are concentrated in an area approximately 15 mi east to west and 5 mi north to south, although the Angkor Archaeological Park, which administers the area, includes sites as far away as Kbal Spean, about 30 mi to the north.
Kbal Spean ("Bridge Head") is an Angkorian era archaeological site on the southwest slopes of the Kulen Hills to the northeast of Angkor in Siem Reap District, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.

Ayutthaya Kingdom

AyutthayaSiamKingdom of Siam
The Angkorian period began in AD 802, when the Khmer Hindu monarch Jayavarman II declared himself a "universal monarch" and "god-king", and lasted until the late 14th century, first falling under Ayutthayan suzerainty in 1351.
Before the end of the 15th century, Ayutthaya launched attacks on Angkor, the classical great power of the region.

Phnom Bakheng

Bakheng
In accordance with this cosmic symbolism, Yasovarman built his central temple on a low hill known as Phnom Bakheng, surrounding it with a moat fed from the baray. World Monuments Fund has aided Preah Khan, the Churning of the Sea of Milk (a 49-meter-long bas-relief frieze in Angkor Wat), Ta Som, and Phnom Bakheng.
Phnom Bakheng at Angkor, Cambodia, is a Hindu and Buddhist temple in the form of a temple mountain.

Preah Khan

Jayavarman oversaw the period of Angkor's most prolific construction, which included building of the well-known temples of Ta Prohm and Preah Khan, dedicating them to his parents. World Monuments Fund has aided Preah Khan, the Churning of the Sea of Milk (a 49-meter-long bas-relief frieze in Angkor Wat), Ta Som, and Phnom Bakheng.
Preah Khan (ប្រាសាទព្រះខ័ន; "Royal Sword") is a temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built in the 12th century for King Jayavarman VII to honor his father.

Ta Prohm

Jayavarman oversaw the period of Angkor's most prolific construction, which included building of the well-known temples of Ta Prohm and Preah Khan, dedicating them to his parents.
Ta Prohm (ប្រាសាទតាព្រហ្ម, pronunciation: prasat taprohm) is the modern name of the temple at Angkor, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia, built in the Bayon style largely in the late 12th and early 13th centuries and originally called Rajavihara (in Khmer: រាជវិហារ).

Bayon

the BayonBàyon
Over the ruins of Yaśodharapura, Jayavarman constructed the walled city of Angkor Thom, as well as its geographic and spiritual center, the temple known as the Bayon.
The Bayon (ប្រាសាទបាយ័ន, Prasat Bayon) is a richly decorated Khmer temple at Angkor in Cambodia.

Zhou Daguan

Zhou Daguan
The year 1296 marked the arrival at Angkor of the Chinese diplomat Zhou Daguan.
He is most well known for his accounts of the customs of Cambodia and the Angkor temple complexes during his visit there.

Yasovarman I

YasovarmanYasovarman IŚrī Yaśovarman
In 889, Yasovarman ascended to the throne.
Because of his father had sought to deny his accession, according to inscriptions cited by L.P. Briggs, "Yasovarman I ignored his claim to the throne through his father, Indravarman I, or through Jayavarman II, the founder of Angkor dynasty, and built up an elaborate family tree, connecting himself through his mother with ancient kings of Funan and Chenla."

Siem Reap Province

Siem ReapSiem ReabSiammarat
The ruins of Angkor are located amid forests and farmland north of the Great Lake (Tonlé Sap) and south of the Kulen Hills, near modern-day Siem Reap city (13°24′N, 103°51′E), in Siem Reap Province.
In modern times the province is best known as the site of Angkor and the Angkor Wat temple ruins.

Maurice Glaize

In addition, scholars associated with the school including George Coedès, Maurice Glaize, Paul Mus, Philippe Stern and others initiated a program of historical scholarship and interpretation that is fundamental to the current understanding of Angkor.
Maurice Glaize (26 December 1886 – 17 July 1964) was a French architect and archeologist, Conservator of Angkor from 1937 to 1945.

The Customs of Cambodia

accounts
Zhou's one-year sojourn in the Khmer capital during the reign of King Indravarman III is historically significant, because he penned a still-surviving account, The Customs of Cambodia, of approximately forty pages detailing his observations of Khmer society.
The Customs of Cambodia, also translated as A Record of Cambodia: the Land and Its People, is a book written by the Yuan dynasty Chinese official Zhou Daguan who stayed in Angkor between 1296 and 1297.

Ta Som

World Monuments Fund has aided Preah Khan, the Churning of the Sea of Milk (a 49-meter-long bas-relief frieze in Angkor Wat), Ta Som, and Phnom Bakheng.
Ta Som is a small temple at Angkor, Cambodia, built at the end of the 12th century for King Jayavarman VII.

Henri Mouhot

Henri MouhotAlexandre Henri Mouhot
While Angkor was known to the local Khmer and was shown to European visitors; Henri Mouhot in 1860 and Anna Leonowens in 1865, it remained cloaked by the forest until the end of the 19th century.
He is remembered mostly in connection to Angkor.

Devaraja

devarajadevarājagod-king
The Angkorian period began in AD 802, when the Khmer Hindu monarch Jayavarman II declared himself a "universal monarch" and "god-king", and lasted until the late 14th century, first falling under Ayutthayan suzerainty in 1351.
The example of this grand projects are Borobudur, Prambanan, also temples and barays in Angkor.

École française d'Extrême-Orient

École française d'Extrême-OrientÉcole Française d'Extrême OrientEcole Francaise d’Extreme Orient
From 1907 to 1970, work was under the direction of the École française d'Extrême-Orient, which cleared away the forest, repaired foundations, and installed drains to protect the buildings from water damage.
Since 1907, the EFEO has been in charge of conservation work at the archeological site of Angkor.

Khmer alphabet

KhmerKhmer scriptKhmer alphabet – Unicode
Temples from the period of Chenla bear stone inscriptions, in both Sanskrit and Khmer, naming both Hindu and local ancestral deities, with Shiva supreme among the former.
The modern Khmer script differs somewhat from precedent forms seen on the inscriptions of the ruins of Angkor.