Anglo-Métis

Anglo-MetisCountry-bornCountrybornAnglo-country bornhalf-CreeMetis people
A 19th century community of the Métis people of Canada, the Anglo-Métis, more commonly known as Countryborn, were children of fur traders; they typically had Scots (Orcadian, mainland Scottish), or English fathers and Aboriginal mothers.wikipedia
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Canadian Gaelic

GaelicScottish GaelicCanadian communities with Scottish Gaelic speakers
Some of their fathers spoke Gaelic or Scots, leading to the development of the creole language known as "Bungee".
Used primarily by the Anglo- and Scots-Métis traders, the "Red River Dialect" or Bungee was a mixture of Gaelic and English with many terms borrowed from the local native languages.

Indigenous peoples in Canada

AboriginalIndigenousAboriginal peoples in Canada
A 19th century community of the Métis people of Canada, the Anglo-Métis, more commonly known as Countryborn, were children of fur traders; they typically had Scots (Orcadian, mainland Scottish), or English fathers and Aboriginal mothers.
A 19th-century community of the Métis people, the Anglo-Métis, were referred to as Countryborn.

North-West Rebellion

Northwest RebellionRiel RebellionNorth West Rebellion
The Anglo-Métis played a role in both the Red River Rebellion (or "Red River Uprising") of 1869 and the Northwest Rebellion (or "Northwest Uprising") of 1885, as they suffered from similar issues of racial discrimination and land problems as their francophone brethren.
In 1884, the Métis (including the Anglo-Métis) asked Louis Riel to return from the United States, where he had fled after the Red River Rebellion, to appeal to the government on their behalf.

English people

EnglishEnglishmanEnglishmen
A 19th century community of the Métis people of Canada, the Anglo-Métis, more commonly known as Countryborn, were children of fur traders; they typically had Scots (Orcadian, mainland Scottish), or English fathers and Aboriginal mothers.

Bungi Creole

BungiBungeeBungee language
Some of their fathers spoke Gaelic or Scots, leading to the development of the creole language known as "Bungee".

Red River Rebellion

Red River Resistance1869Riel Rebellion
The Anglo-Métis played a role in both the Red River Rebellion (or "Red River Uprising") of 1869 and the Northwest Rebellion (or "Northwest Uprising") of 1885, as they suffered from similar issues of racial discrimination and land problems as their francophone brethren.
Their mixed-race descendants were generally English-speaking and were sometimes known as the "country born" (also as Anglo-Métis).

James Isbister

Prominent Anglo-Métis / Countryborn include James Isbister, Thomas McKay and John Norquay, the Premier of Manitoba from 1878 to 1887.
Prominent among the Anglo-Métis of the area, he is considered to be the founder of the city of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan.

John Norquay

Prominent Anglo-Métis / Countryborn include James Isbister, Thomas McKay and John Norquay, the Premier of Manitoba from 1878 to 1887.
Norquay came from an Anglo-Métis ethnic background (the contemporary term used was "Half-Breed", which was not then considered offensive and is even an important constitutional designation, given the rights afforded to them in the Manitoba Act).

Métis in Canada

MétisMetisMétis people
A 19th century community of the Métis people of Canada, the Anglo-Métis, more commonly known as Countryborn, were children of fur traders; they typically had Scots (Orcadian, mainland Scottish), or English fathers and Aboriginal mothers.
After New France was ceded to Great Britain's control in 1763, there was an important distinction between French Métis born of francophone voyageur fathers, and the Anglo-Métis (known as "countryborn" or Mixed Bloods, for instance in the 1870 census of Manitoba) descended from English or Scottish fathers.

Prince Albert, Saskatchewan

Prince AlbertPrince Albert, SKIsbister's Settlement
James Isbister, an Anglo-Métis employee of the Hudson's Bay Company, settled on the site of the current city in 1862.

Thomas McKay (Northwest Territories politician)

Thomas McKayThomas McKay (N.W.T. politician)
Prominent Anglo-Métis / Countryborn include James Isbister, Thomas McKay and John Norquay, the Premier of Manitoba from 1878 to 1887.
McKay was a Protestant Métis or Anglo-Metis individual, and was involved in the troubles of 1885 on the side of the federal government.

Métis

Métis peopleMetisMetis people
Additionally, the Anglo-Métis / Countryborn had a more sedentary lifestyle of farming than the francophone Métis community, whose men were generally hunters and trappers.

Cree

Cree peopleNehiyawCree Nation
According to Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, the Métis were historically the children of French fur traders and Nehiyaw women or, from unions of English or Scottish traders and northern Dene women (Anglo-Métis).

Anglo

Anglo-ScotAnglo-ScottishAnglos
(In Quebec, the word Anglophone or Anglo refers to English-speaking Quebecers in both English and French.) Anglo-Metis is also sometimes used to refer to a historical ethnic group.

Orcadians

Orcadian
A 19th century community of the Métis people of Canada, the Anglo-Métis, more commonly known as Countryborn, were children of fur traders; they typically had Scots (Orcadian, mainland Scottish), or English fathers and Aboriginal mothers.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
A 19th century community of the Métis people of Canada, the Anglo-Métis, more commonly known as Countryborn, were children of fur traders; they typically had Scots (Orcadian, mainland Scottish), or English fathers and Aboriginal mothers.

Scottish people

ScottishScotsScot
A 19th century community of the Métis people of Canada, the Anglo-Métis, more commonly known as Countryborn, were children of fur traders; they typically had Scots (Orcadian, mainland Scottish), or English fathers and Aboriginal mothers.

Cree language

Creelanguagecre
Their first languages were generally those of their mothers: Cree, Saulteaux, Assiniboine, etc. and English.

Western Ojibwa language

SaulteauxWestern Ojibwe (Saulteaux)Western Ojibwa
Their first languages were generally those of their mothers: Cree, Saulteaux, Assiniboine, etc. and English.

Assiniboine language

AssiniboineasbAssiniboine (Nakona or A' M̆oqazh)
Their first languages were generally those of their mothers: Cree, Saulteaux, Assiniboine, etc. and English.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Their first languages were generally those of their mothers: Cree, Saulteaux, Assiniboine, etc. and English.

Scots language

ScotsLowland ScotsScottish
Some of their fathers spoke Gaelic or Scots, leading to the development of the creole language known as "Bungee".

Creole language

creolecreolescreole languages
Some of their fathers spoke Gaelic or Scots, leading to the development of the creole language known as "Bungee".