A report on Anglo-Zulu War

Detail of a painting depicting the Battle of Rorke's Drift
Bartle Frere
Photograph of Cetshwayo kaMpande, c. 1875
King Mpande
Zulu village, c. 1849
Hicks Beach
Battle of Isandlwana painting by Charles Edwin Fripp (1854–1906)
British Army military map of Zulu Land, 1879
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Zulu warriors, 1879 (Charles Edwin Fripp)
Battle of the Intombe river
The burning of Ulundi
Last Sleep of the Brave, 1879 (Alphonse de Neuville)

Fought in 1879 between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom.

- Anglo-Zulu War
Detail of a painting depicting the Battle of Rorke's Drift

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Photograph of Cetshwayo by Alexander Bassano in Old Bond Street, London

Cetshwayo

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Photograph of Cetshwayo by Alexander Bassano in Old Bond Street, London
Cetshwayo c. undefined 1875.
Cetshwayo (called Cettiwayo in the caption of the photo above), in Cape Town shortly after his capture in the 1879 Anglo-Zulu War. He was exiled from Southern Africa after his capture, although eventually allowed to return by the British government.
Cetshwayo visited England in 1882 when this portrait was painted by Karl Rudolf Sohn.
Cartoon by E. C. Mountford of 1882, depicting Cetshwayo being lectured by the anti-imperialist MP for Birmingham, John Bright
Cetshwayo Blue Plaque in Kensington, London
Mangosuthu Buthelezi.

Cetshwayo kaMpande (c. undefined 1826 – 8 February 1884) was the king of the Zulu Kingdom from 1873 to 1879 and its leader during the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879.

Lieutenants Melvill and Coghill flee the camp with the Queen's Colour of the 1st battalion of the 24th Regiment

Battle of Isandlwana

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Lieutenants Melvill and Coghill flee the camp with the Queen's Colour of the 1st battalion of the 24th Regiment
Lieutenants Melvill and Coghill flee the camp with the Queen's Colour of the 1st battalion of the 24th Regiment
Lord Chelmsford
British Army "Military Map of Zulu Land", 1879. Rorke's Drift is at the convergence of the red, green and blue border lines, Islandlwana is slightly to the right
Cetshwayo, c. 1875
Zulu warriors, 1882
Dabulamanzi kaMpande
The Battle of Isandlwana (Charles Edwin Fripp)
Lts Melvill and Coghill attacked by Zulu warriors.
#94 the flag of the 24th Regiment (2nd Warwickshire) (Post-1881 Childers Reforms known as the South Wales Borderers).
Memorial erected at the site commemorating the valour of the fallen Zulu impi at Isandlwana Hill, which is visible in the background
Photo of Isandlwana with one of the cairns marking one of the many British mass graves at the site
Field Marshal Lord Wolseley
At Isandhlawana, the Zulu impis scored their greatest victory, liquidating a significant part of the British invasion force. More British officers were killed at Isandhlawana by the Zulu, than Napoleon killed at Waterloo.

The Battle of Isandlwana (alternative spelling: Isandhlwana) on 22 January 1879 was the first major encounter in the Anglo-Zulu War between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom.

Zulu Kingdom

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Monarchy in Southern Africa that extended along the coast of the Indian Ocean from the Tugela River in the south to Pongola River in the north.

Monarchy in Southern Africa that extended along the coast of the Indian Ocean from the Tugela River in the south to Pongola River in the north.

Location of the Zulu Kingdom, c. 1890 (red) (borders in flux)
Drawing of King Shaka (c. undefined 1824)
Map illustrating the rise of the Zulu Empire under Shaka (1816–1828) in present-day South Africa. The rise of the Zulu Empire forced other chiefdoms and clans to flee across a wide area of southern Africa. Clans fleeing the Zulu war zone included the Soshangane, Zwangendaba, Ndebele, Hlubi, Ngwane, and the Mfengu. A number of clans were caught between the Zulu Empire and advancing Voortrekkers and British Empire  such as the Xhosa . East of the green area was the land of the Mpondo under their king Faku and their brother clan the Mpondomise. Faku created a No Man's Land as a buffer between his kingdom and the Zulu.
King Dingane (Artist: Allen Francis Gardiner)
Military innovations such as the assegai, the age-grade regimental system and encirclement tactics helped make the Zulu one of the most powerful clans in southern and south-eastern Africa.
King Mpande (Artist: George French Angas)
King Cetshwayo (c. undefined 1875)
The Battle of Isandlwana, 1879
King Dinuzulu (c. undefined 1883)

In 1879, the British Empire invaded, beginning the Anglo-Zulu War.

Henry Bartle Frere

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Welsh British colonial administrator.

Welsh British colonial administrator.

Henry Bartle Frere, by 'Spy' in Vanity Fair, 1873
Southern Africa in 1878, on the eve of the confederation wars, with the Cape Colony in dark pink.
Pro-imperialist cartoon showing Sir Bartle Frere vanquishing the "negrophilist" liberals of the Cape government, represented by MP Saul Solomon.
Sir Henry Bartle Frere in the 1880s.
The Battle of Isandlwana, Anglo-Zulu War
The Battle of Majuba Hill, First Boer War
The Basotho King and ministers.
Remains of the Frere Bridge over the Orange River at Aliwal North. The bridge was opened on 21 July 1880, shortly before Frere's departure from the Cape.
Memorial to Sir Bartle Frere in the Cape Lantern newspaper.
Henry Bartle Frere's statue on the Thames embankment

However, as High Commissioner for Southern Africa (1877–1880), he implemented a set of policies which attempted to impose a British confederation on the region and which led to the overthrow of the Cape's first elected government in 1878 and to a string of regional wars, culminating in the invasion of Zululand (1879) and the First Boer War (1880–1881).

The Burning of oNdini

Battle of Ulundi

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The Burning of oNdini
Photograph of Cetshwayo, c. 1875
Lord Chelmsford
Field Marshal Lord Wolseley
A British map of the battle
The 17th Lancers charge the Zulus (illustration)
Sir Garnet Wolseley's camp at Ulundi

The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi (Zulu:oNdini) on 4 July 1879 and was the last major battle of the Anglo-Zulu War.

The Defence of Rorke's Drift, by Alphonse de Neuville (1880)

Battle of Rorke's Drift

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The Defence of Rorke's Drift, by Alphonse de Neuville (1880)
The Defence of Rorke's Drift, by Alphonse de Neuville (1880)
British Army "Military Map of Zulu Land", 1879. Rorke's Drift is at the convergence of the red, green and blue border lines, Islandlwana is slightly to the right
Prince Dabulamanzi kaMpande
Historical picture of Zulu warriors from about the same time as the events at Rorke's Drift
Contemporary drawing of Rorke's Drift Post, from The History of the Corps of Royal Engineers.
The Defence of Rorke's Drift by Lady Butler (1880).
Picture taken about 1884 at the site of the battle, allegedly showing VC recipients including Bromhead and Reynolds. Man in rear wearing Foreign Service helmet is not Corporal Schiess but Alan Richard Hill V.C.
Sgt Frank Bourne, DCM, in 1905
Illustration by C. H. M. Kerr for Haggard's story, 1893
John Chard, VC, as a lieutenant-colonel
Lieutenant Gonville Bromhead,VC
Corporal William Allen,VC [right foreground] handing cartridges to Lt Chard
Private Frederick Hitch, VC
Private Henry Alfred Hook, VC
Private Robert Jones, VC
Private William Jones, VC
Private John Williams,VC
Surgeon-Major James Henry Reynolds,VC
Corporal Ferdinand Schiess, VC

The Battle of Rorke's Drift (1879), also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an engagement in the Anglo-Zulu War.

Frederic Thesiger, c. 1870

Frederic Thesiger, 2nd Baron Chelmsford

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Frederic Thesiger, c. 1870
Lord Chelmsford sketched by another officer at the Battle of Ulundi
Defeat at Isandlwana
Funerary monument, Brompton Cemetery, London

Frederic Augustus Thesiger, 2nd Baron Chelmsford, (31 May 1827 – 9 April 1905) was a British Army officer who rose to prominence during the Anglo-Zulu War, when an expeditionary force under his command suffered a decisive defeat at the hands of a Zulu force at the Battle of Isandlwana in 1879.

Colony of Natal

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British colony in south-eastern Africa.

British colony in south-eastern Africa.

Detail of a painting depicting the Battle of Rorke's Drift during the Anglo-Zulu War 11 January – 4 July 1879
War theater in northern Natal
First public auction of Natal sugar, Durban, 1855

Nonetheless, tensions between the British colonists and the Zulu continued to build, culminating in the Anglo-Zulu War.

Battle of Kambula by Melton Prior

Battle of Kambula

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Battle of Kambula by Melton Prior

The Battle of Kambula took place on 29 March 1879, during the Anglo-Zulu War, when a Zulu military force attacked the British camp at Kambula, having routed the mounted element of the British force at the Battle of Hlobane the day before.

Photographic portrait by Cornelius Jabez Hughes, 1878

Benjamin Disraeli

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British statesman and Conservative politician who twice served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

British statesman and Conservative politician who twice served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

Photographic portrait by Cornelius Jabez Hughes, 1878
Disraeli's father, mother and sister—Isaac, Maria and Sarah
Disraeli as a young man—a retrospective portrayal painted in 1852
Friends and allies of Disraeli in the 1830s: clockwise from top left—Croker, Lyndhurst, Henrietta Sykes and Lady Londonderry
Opponents of Disraeli: O'Connell and Labouchere
Mary Anne Lewis c. 1820–30
Clockwise from top left: Bright, Peel, Bentinck and Stanley
Clockwise from top left: Russell, Rothschild, Manners and Granby
The Earl of Derby, Prime Minister 1852, 1858–59, 1866–68
Gladstone in the 1850s
Lord Robert Cecil, Disraeli's fierce opponent in the 1860s, but later his ally and successor
Clockwise from top left: Chelmsford, Cairns, Hunt and Manning
Disraeli circa 1870
Derby (top) and Northcote
Disraeli's failure to appoint Samuel Wilberforce as Bishop of London may have cost him votes in the 1868 election.
Portrait of Disraeli published in 1873
New Crowns for Old depicts Disraeli as Abanazar from the pantomime Aladdin, offering Victoria an imperial crown in exchange for a royal one. Disraeli cultivated a public image of himself as an Imperialist with grand gestures such as conferring on Queen Victoria the title "Empress of India".
Fight in Bulgaria during the Russo-Turkish War of 1877–78
International delegates at the Constantinople Conference: clockwise from top left, Saffet Pasha (Turkey), General Ignatieff (Russia), Lord Salisbury (Britain) and the Comte de Chaudordy (France)
Bulgaria as constituted under the San Stefano treaty and as divided at Berlin
Disraeli (right) and Salisbury as Knights of the Garter, portrayed by John Tenniel in "The Pas de deux (From the Scène de Triomphe in the Grand Anglo-Turkish Ballet d'Action)"
A depiction of the Battle of Kandahar, fought in 1880. Britain's victory in the Second Anglo-Afghan War proved a boost to Disraeli's government.
Statue of Disraeli in Parliament Square, London
Title page of first edition of Sybil (1845)
Disraeli, the first person caricatured in the London magazine Vanity Fair, 30 January 1869. Caricatures led to a rapid increase in demand for the magazine.
Actor George Arliss (1868–1946)-- in 1929 he won the Oscar for personifying Disraeli's "paternalistic, kindly, homely statesmanship."

Controversial wars in Afghanistan and South Africa undermined his public support.