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Zulu Kingdom

ZululandZuluZulus
The Anglo-Zulu War was fought in 1879 between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom.
In 1879, the British Empire invaded, beginning the Anglo-Zulu War.

Battle of Isandlwana

IsandlwanaIsandhlwanabattle of Isandhlwana
The war is notable for several particularly bloody battles, including an opening victory of the Zulu at the Battle of Isandlwana, followed by the defeat of a large Zulu army at Rorke's Drift by a small force of British troops. On 22 January the centre column, which had advanced from Rorke's Drift, was encamped near Isandlwana; on the morning of that day Lord Chelmsford split his forces and moved out to support a reconnoitering party, leaving the camp in charge of Colonel Pulleine.
The Battle of Isandlwana (alternative spelling: Isandhlwana) on 22 January 1879 was the first major encounter in the Anglo–Zulu War between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom.

Henry Herbert, 4th Earl of Carnarvon

Lord CarnarvonThe Earl of CarnarvonEarl of Carnarvon
Following Lord Carnarvon's successful introduction of federation in Canada, it was thought that similar political effort, coupled with military campaigns, might succeed with the African kingdoms, tribal areas and Boer republics in South Africa.
Of the resultant wars, the disastrous invasion of Zululand ended in annexation, but the first Anglo-Boer War of 1880 had even more far-reaching consequences for the subcontinent.

Benjamin Disraeli

DisraeliLord BeaconsfieldBeaconsfield
British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli's Tory administration in London did not want a war with the Zulus.
The Second Anglo-Afghan War and the Anglo-Zulu War in South Africa undermined his public support.

Colony of Natal

NatalGovernor of the Colony of NatalLieutenant-governor of the Colony of Natal
Natal in south-eastern Africa was proclaimed a British colony on 4 May 1843 after the British government had annexed the Boer Republic of Natalia.
Nonetheless, tensions between the British colonists and the Zulu continued to build, culminating in the Anglo-Zulu War.

Paul Kruger

KrugerPresident KrugerPresident Paul Kruger
Persistent Boer representations and Paul Kruger's diplomatic manoeuvrings added to the pressure.
Soon after he entered Zululand in January 1879, starting the Anglo-Zulu War, his unlaagered central column was surprised by Cetshwayo's Zulus at Isandlwana and almost totally destroyed.

Henry Pulleine

Colonel PulleinePulleine
On 22 January the centre column, which had advanced from Rorke's Drift, was encamped near Isandlwana; on the morning of that day Lord Chelmsford split his forces and moved out to support a reconnoitering party, leaving the camp in charge of Colonel Pulleine.
Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Burmester Pulleine (12 December 1838 – 22 January 1879) was an administrator and commander in the British Army in the Cape Frontier and Anglo-Zulu Wars.

Charles Pearson (British Army officer)

Charles PearsonColonel Charles Pearson
While the British central column under Chelmsford's command was thus engaged, the right flank column on the coast, under Colonel Charles Pearson, crossed the Tugela River, skirmished with a Zulu impi that was attempting to set up an ambush at the Inyezane River, and advanced as far as the deserted missionary station of Eshowe, which he set about fortifying.
Lieutenant General Sir Charles Knight Pearson (July 1834 – 2 October 1909) was a military commander in the British Army during the Anglo-Zulu War (also known as the Zulu War).

Evelyn Wood (British Army officer)

Evelyn WoodSir Evelyn WoodField Marshal Sir Evelyn Wood
Meanwhile, the left flank column at Utrecht, under Colonel Evelyn Wood, had originally been charged with occupying the Zulu tribes of north-west Zululand and preventing them from interfering with the British central column's advance on Ulundi.
Wood further served as a commander in several other conflicts, notably the Third Anglo-Ashanti War, the Anglo-Zulu War, the First Boer War and the Mahdist War.

Natalia Republic

NataliaNatalRepublic of Natalia
Natal in south-eastern Africa was proclaimed a British colony on 4 May 1843 after the British government had annexed the Boer Republic of Natalia.
After the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879, the British defeated the Zulu army, and annexed Zululand to Natal in 1897.

Battle of Hlobane

Hlobaneattack on HlobaneInhlobana
To this end Wood set up camp at Tinta's Kraal, just 10 miles south of Hlobane Mountain, where a force of 4,000 Zulus had been spotted. Lieutenant Colonel Redvers Buller, led the attack on Hlobane on 28 March.
The Battle of Hlobane was a battle of the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879 that took place at Hlobane, near the current town of Vryheid in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

Battle of Kambula

Kambula
The British held them off in the Battle of Kambula and after five hours of heavy attacks the Zulus withdrew with heavy losses but were pursued by British mounted troops, who killed many more fleeing and wounded warriors.
Battle of Kambula took place in 1879, during the Anglo-Zulu War when a Zulu Army attacked the British camp at Kambula.

Napoléon, Prince Imperial

Prince ImperialNapoléon EugèneLouis Napoleon
One of the early British casualties was the exiled heir to the French throne, Imperial Prince Napoleon Eugene, who had volunteered to serve in the British army and was killed on 1 June while out with a reconnoitering party.
Keen to see action, he successfully put pressure on the British to allow him to participate in the Anglo-Zulu War.

Siege of Eshowe

Eshowebesieged at Eshowebesieged for two months
While the British central column under Chelmsford's command was thus engaged, the right flank column on the coast, under Colonel Charles Pearson, crossed the Tugela River, skirmished with a Zulu impi that was attempting to set up an ambush at the Inyezane River, and advanced as far as the deserted missionary station of Eshowe, which he set about fortifying.
The Siege of Eshowe was part of a three-pronged attack on the Zulu Impis of king Cetshwayo at Ulundi during the Anglo-Zulu War.

Battle of Ulundi

UlundiUlindivictory
On 4 July, the armies clashed at the Battle of Ulundi, and Cetshwayo's forces were decisively defeated.
The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4 July 1879 and was the last major battle of the Anglo-Zulu War.

Pietermaritzburg

Maritzburgdefining moment in 1893history
He moved his troops from Pietermaritzburg to a forward camp at Helpmekaar, past Greytown.
The IFP, being strongly Zulu nationalist, desired that Ulundi, the capital of the Zulu Kingdom at the time of its fall to the British in the Anglo-Zulu War, be the post-apartheid capital of the province.

John Colenso

Bishop ColensoColensoBishop John Colenso
King Cetshwayo now found no defender in Natal save the bishop of Natal, John Colenso.
Colenso's concern about the misleading information that was being provided to the Colonial Secretary in London by Shepstone and the Governor of Natal prompted him to devote much of the final part of his life to championing the cause of the Zulus against Boer oppression and official encroachments.

Impi

impisZulu warriorsBullhorn Ambush
Chelmsford was lured eastward with much of his centre column by a Zulu diversionary force while the main Impi attacked his camp.
In Shaka's day, warriors often wore elaborate plumes and cow tail regalia in battle, but by the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879, many warriors wore only a loin cloth and a minimal form of headdress.

Redvers Buller

Sir Redvers BullerBullerGeneral Sir Redvers Buller
Lieutenant Colonel Redvers Buller, led the attack on Hlobane on 28 March.
He then served in South Africa during the 9th Cape Frontier War in 1878 and the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879.

Battle of Intombe

IntombeIntombiIntombi River
He took refuge with Cetshwayo and was granted land in the region of the Intombe River in western Zululand.
The village of Lüneberg, situated at -27.31694°N, 30.61583°W in the disputed territories to the north of Zululand, had been laagered by its white settlers ever since the Anglo-Zulu War had begun.

Henry Bartle Frere

Sir Bartle FrereSir Henry Bartle FrereBartle Frere
In 1874, Sir Henry Bartle Frere was sent to South Africa as High Commissioner for the British Empire to bring such plans into being.
The ill-advised policies of both Frere and his local ally, John Gordon Sprigg, ended up causing a string of wars across Southern Africa, culminating in the disastrous Anglo-Zulu and Boer Wars.

Zulu (1964 film)

Zulu19641964 film of the same name
Zulu (1964), which is based on the Battle at Rorke's Drift, and
Zulu is a 1964 British epic war film depicting the Battle of Rorke's Drift between the British Army and the Zulus in January 1879, during the Anglo-Zulu War.

John Robert Dunn

John Dunn
The dynasty of Shaka was deposed, and the Zulu country portioned among eleven Zulu chiefs, including Usibepu, John Dunn, a white adventurer, and Hlubi, a Basuto chief allied to the British in the war.
In the run-up to the Zulu War, he was served with an ultimatum by the British at the same time as Cetshwayo.

Battle of Rorke's Drift

Rorke's Driftdefence of Rorke's Driftbattle at Rorke's Drift
The war is notable for several particularly bloody battles, including an opening victory of the Zulu at the Battle of Isandlwana, followed by the defeat of a large Zulu army at Rorke's Drift by a small force of British troops.
The Battle of Rorke's Drift, also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an engagement in the Anglo-Zulu War.

Langalibalele

In 1874 he took up the cause of Langalibalele and the Hlubi and Ngwe tribes in representations to the Colonial Secretary, Lord Carnarvon.
The ill-fated confederation scheme also required the British annexation of the remaining independent states of southern Africa, leading to the Anglo-Zulu War and the First Anglo-Boer War, among other conflicts.