Angry young men

angry young manAngryAngry British fictionangsty young manThe Angry Young Moose
The "angry young men" were a group of mostly working- and middle-class British playwrights and novelists who became prominent in the 1950s.wikipedia
128 Related Articles

Look Back in Anger

eponymous playRecordando con irathe 1956 play
The phrase was originally coined by the Royal Court Theatre's press officer in order to promote Osborne's 1956 play Look Back in Anger. The playwright John Osborne was the archetypal example, and his signature play Look Back in Anger (1956) attracted attention to a style of drama contrasting strongly with the genteel and understated works of Terence Rattigan that had been in fashion.
The play spawned the term "angry young men" to describe Osborne and those of his generation who employed the harshness of realism in the theatre in contrast to the more escapist theatre that characterised the previous generation.

Kingsley Amis

New Maps of HellSir Kingsley AmisAmis, Kingsley
The group's leading figures included John Osborne and Kingsley Amis. These included Kingsley Amis, Philip Larkin and John Wain, all of whom were also part of the poetic circle known as "The Movement".
The novel won the Somerset Maugham Award for fiction and Amis was associated with the writers labelled the Angry Young Men.

Royal Court Theatre

Royal CourtCourt TheatreThe Royal Court Theatre
The phrase was originally coined by the Royal Court Theatre's press officer in order to promote Osborne's 1956 play Look Back in Anger.
Devine produced the new company's third production in 1956, John Osborne's Look Back in Anger, a play by one of the angry young men.

The Entertainer (play)

The EntertainerArchie Riceplay
Osborne's The Entertainer (1957) secured his reputation, with Laurence Olivier playing the protagonist Archie Rice.
Having depicted an "angry young man" in the earlier play, Osborne wrote at Laurence Olivier's request about an angry middle-aged man in The Entertainer.

John Osborne

OsborneJ. Osborne
The group's leading figures included John Osborne and Kingsley Amis. The playwright John Osborne was the archetypal example, and his signature play Look Back in Anger (1956) attracted attention to a style of drama contrasting strongly with the genteel and understated works of Terence Rattigan that had been in fashion.
It was George Fearon, a part-time press officer at the theatre, who invented the phrase "angry young man".

Terence Rattigan

RattiganSir Terence RattiganTerrence Rattigan
The playwright John Osborne was the archetypal example, and his signature play Look Back in Anger (1956) attracted attention to a style of drama contrasting strongly with the genteel and understated works of Terence Rattigan that had been in fashion.
He believed in understated emotions and craftsmanship, which was deemed old fashioned and "pre-war" after the overnight success in 1956 of John Osborne's Look Back in Anger began the era of kitchen sink dramas by the writers known as the Angry Young Men.

Novelist

writer of novelsnovelistsnovel writer
The "angry young men" were a group of mostly working- and middle-class British playwrights and novelists who became prominent in the 1950s.
Later, in 1950s Britain, came a group of writers known as the "Angry young men," which included the novelists Alan Sillitoe and Kingsley Amis, who came from the working class and who wrote about working class culture.

Kitchen sink realism

kitchen sink dramakitchen sinkkitchen sink dramas
Referred to as "kitchen sink realism", literary works began to deal with lower class themes. On television, their writings were often expressed in plays in anthology drama series such as Armchair Theatre (ITV, 1956–68) and The Wednesday Play (BBC, 1964–70); this leads to a confusion with the kitchen sink drama category of the early 1960s.
Kitchen sink realism (or kitchen sink drama) is a British cultural movement that developed in the late 1950s and early 1960s in theatre, art, novels, film, and television plays, whose protagonists usually could be described as "angry young men" who were disillusioned with modern society.

Armchair Theatre

ABC Armchair TheatreArmchair CinemaArmchair Mystery Theatre
On television, their writings were often expressed in plays in anthology drama series such as Armchair Theatre (ITV, 1956–68) and The Wednesday Play (BBC, 1964–70); this leads to a confusion with the kitchen sink drama category of the early 1960s.
Migrating from his native Canada to take up his responsibilities with ABC, Sydney Newman objected to the basis of British television drama at the time he arrived: "The only legitimate theatre was of the 'anyone for tennis' variety, which, on the whole, presented a condescending view of working-class people. Television dramas were usually adaptations of stage plays, and invariably about upper classes. I said 'Damn the upper classes - they don't even own televisions!'" He converted Armchair Theatre into a vehicle for the generation of "Angry Young Men" that was emerging after John Osborne's play Look Back in Anger (1956) had become a great success, although older writers such as Ted Willis were not excluded.

Declaration (anthology)

Declaration
Publisher Tom Maschler, who edited a collection of political-literary essays by the 'Angries' (Declaration, 1957), commented: "(T)hey do not belong to a united movement. Far from it; they attack one another directly or indirectly in these pages. Some were even reluctant to appear between the same covers with others whose views they violently oppose."
The book is closely associated with the angry young men movement, and the essays are presented as "credos" of the writers.

John Braine

John Gerard Braine
Apart from John Osborne, these included Harold Pinter, John Braine, Arnold Wesker and Alan Sillitoe.
Braine is usually listed among the angry young men, a loosely defined group of English writers who emerged on the literary scene in the 1950s.

Bill Hopkins (novelist)

Bill Hopkins
Also included among the Angry Young Men was a small group of young existentialist philosophers, led by Colin Wilson and also including Stuart Holroyd and Bill Hopkins.
Bill Hopkins (5 May 1928 – 6 May 2011) was a Welsh novelist and journalist who has been grouped with the angry young men.

Alan Sillitoe

Alan SilitoeSillitoe, Alan
Apart from John Osborne, these included Harold Pinter, John Braine, Arnold Wesker and Alan Sillitoe.
Alan Sillitoe (4 March 1928 – 25 April 2010) was an English writer and one of the so-called "angry young men" of the 1950s.

John Wain

John Barrington WainWain, John
As a catchphrase, the term was applied to a large, incoherently defined group, and was rejected by most of the writers to whom it was applied: see, for example, "Answer to a Letter from Joe" by John Wain (Essays on Literature and Ideas, 1963).
Wain was often referred to as one of the "Angry Young Men", a term applied to 1950s writers such as John Braine, John Osborne, Alan Sillitoe and Keith Waterhouse, as radicals who opposed the British establishment and conservative elements of society at that time.

Leslie Paul

It is thought to be derived from the autobiography of Leslie Paul, founder of the Woodcraft Folk, whose Angry Young Man was published in 1951.
The title subsequently became the catchphrase "angry young men" used to describe a generation of British writers, including Kingsley Amis, Colin Wilson and (over-broadly) applied to authors of the "kitchen sink dramas".

Colin Wilson

Wilson, Colin[Colin] Wilson
Also included among the Angry Young Men was a small group of young existentialist philosophers, led by Colin Wilson and also including Stuart Holroyd and Bill Hopkins.
Wilson became associated with the "angry young men" of British literature.

Arnold Wesker

Sir Arnold WeskerShylock
Apart from John Osborne, these included Harold Pinter, John Braine, Arnold Wesker and Alan Sillitoe.
Chicken Soup with Barley (1958) went out to the provinces, and rather than opening in the West End, its premiere was seen at the provincial Coventry Theatre, a locale which typified Wesker's political views as an 'angry young man'.

Stuart Holroyd

Also included among the Angry Young Men was a small group of young existentialist philosophers, led by Colin Wilson and also including Stuart Holroyd and Bill Hopkins.
Wilson and Holroyd, along with the novelist Bill Hopkins, were associated with the literary movement known as the Angry Young Men.

Michael Hastings (playwright)

Michael HastingsHastings, Michael
Michael Hastings
His early plays –Don't Destroy Me (1956), Yes And After (1957) – reflected the influence of the Angry Young Men movement and his brief involvement with the circle surrounding Colin Wilson.

British New Wave

New Waveangry young manAngry Young Men
*British New Wave, also known as the Angry Young Man film genre—a British film genre of the 1960s, featuring working-class heroes and left-wing themes.
There is considerable overlap between the New Wave and the angry young men, those artists in British theatre and film such as playwright John Osborne and director Tony Richardson, who challenged the social status quo.

The Movement (literature)

The MovementMovement
These included Kingsley Amis, Philip Larkin and John Wain, all of whom were also part of the poetic circle known as "The Movement".
The "Angry Young Men" movement occurred in 1956 during the turning point of The Movement.

Kenneth Tynan

Ken TynanKenneth Tynan - In Praise of Hardcore
Kenneth Tynan
Tynan espoused a new theatrical realism, best exemplified in the works of the playwrights who became known as the "Angry Young Men".

Thomas Hinde (novelist)

Sir Thomas HindeSir Thomas Willes Chitty, 3rd BaronetThomas Hinde
Thomas Hinde
His second, Happy As Larry, the story of a disaffected, unemployable, aspiring writer with a failed marriage, led critics to associate him with the Angry Young Men movement.

Working class

working-classlower classworkers
The "angry young men" were a group of mostly working- and middle-class British playwrights and novelists who became prominent in the 1950s.

Middle class

middle-classmiddlemiddle classes
The "angry young men" were a group of mostly working- and middle-class British playwrights and novelists who became prominent in the 1950s.