Anita Loos

Anita and John LoosChéri
Anita Loos (April 26, 1889 – August 18, 1981) was an American screenwriter, playwright and author, best known for her blockbuster comic novel, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.wikipedia
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Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (novel)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes1925 novelbest-selling novel of the same name
Anita Loos (April 26, 1889 – August 18, 1981) was an American screenwriter, playwright and author, best known for her blockbuster comic novel, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes: The Intimate Diary of a Professional Lady is a comic novel written by Anita Loos, first published in 1925.

Frances Marion

Loos, Emerson and fellow writer Frances Marion migrated to New York as a group, with Loos and Emerson sharing a leased mansion in Great Neck, Long Island.
Frances Marion (born Marion Benson Owens, November 18, 1888 – May 12, 1973) was an American journalist, author, film director and screenwriter often cited as the most renowned female screenwriter of the 20th century alongside June Mathis and Anita Loos.

The New York Hat

The New York Hat, starring Mary Pickford and Lionel Barrymore and directed by D. W. Griffith, was her third screenplay and the first to be produced.
The New York Hat (1912) is a short silent film directed by D. W. Griffith from a screenplay by Anita Loos, and starring Mary Pickford, Lionel Barrymore, and Lillian Gish.

John Emerson (filmmaker)

John Emerson
Loos returned to California just as Griffith was leaving Triangle Film Corporation to make the longer films he wanted, and she joined director and future husband John Emerson for a string of successful Douglas Fairbanks films.
Emerson was married to Anita Loos from June 15, 1919 until his death; prior to that they had functioned as a writing team for motion pictures and would continue to be credited jointly, even as Loos pursued independent projects.

R. Beers Loos

Loos' father, R. Beers Loos, founded a tabloid for which her mother, Minerva "Minnie" Smith did most of the work of a newspaper publisher.
Loos was the father of Anita Loos, a famous American playwright and author who wrote, among other titles, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.

Douglas Fairbanks

Douglas Fairbanks, Sr.FairbanksDouglas Fairbanks Senior
Loos returned to California just as Griffith was leaving Triangle Film Corporation to make the longer films he wanted, and she joined director and future husband John Emerson for a string of successful Douglas Fairbanks films. She went on to write many of the Douglas Fairbanks films, as well as the stage adaptation of Colette’s Gigi.
His athleticism was not appreciated by Griffith, however, and he was brought to the attention of Anita Loos and John Emerson, who wrote and directed many of his early romantic comedies.

Ross-Loos Medical Group

Loos had two siblings: Gladys and Clifford (Harry Clifford), a physician and co-founder of the Ross-Loos Medical Group.
Ross-Loos was established in 1929 by two physicians, Donald E. Ross and H. Clifford Loos, older brother of writer Anita Loos.

His Picture in the Papers

His Picture in the Papers (1916) was noted for its wry style of discursive and witty subtitles: "My most popular subtitle introduced the name of a new character. The name was something like this: 'Count Xxerkzsxxv.' Then there was a note, 'To those of you who read titles aloud, you can't pronounce the Count's name. You can only think it.' "
Anita Loos also wrote the film's scenario.

Constance Talmadge

Constance
Loos and Emerson turned down another picture with Davies, preferring to write for their old friend Constance Talmadge, whose brother-in-law Joseph Schenck (husband of Norma Talmadge) was an independent producer.
Her friend Anita Loos, who wrote many screenplays for her, appreciated her "humour and her irresponsible way of life".

Gigi

novel of the same namethe same name
She went on to write many of the Douglas Fairbanks films, as well as the stage adaptation of Colette’s Gigi.
In 1951, it was adapted for the stage by Anita Loos.

But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes

She resolved to retire after her next book, But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes, a sequel to Blondes she had promised Harper's Bazaar.
But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes is a 1927 novel written by Anita Loos.

A Virtuous Vamp

Both A Temperamental Wife (1919) and A Virtuous Vamp (1919) were great hits for Talmadge.
It was written by Anita Loos and John Emerson based on the 1909 play The Bachelor by Clyde Fitch.

Norma Talmadge

Norma
Loos and Emerson turned down another picture with Davies, preferring to write for their old friend Constance Talmadge, whose brother-in-law Joseph Schenck (husband of Norma Talmadge) was an independent producer.
For eight months, she starred in seven features for Triangle, including the comedy The Social Secretary (1916), a comedy written by Anita Loos and directed by John Emerson, that gave her an opportunity to disguise her beauty as a girl trying to avoid the unwelcome attentions of her male employers.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1928 film)

Gentlemen Prefer BlondesGentlemen Prefer Blondes'' (1928 film)first film version
The first film version of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, now lost, was released in 1928 starring Ruth Taylor as Lorelei Lee and Alice White as Dorothy.
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes is a 1928 American silent comedy film directed by Mal St. Clair, co-written by Anita Loos based on her novel, and released by Paramount Pictures.

Flapper

flappersflapper girlflapper era
The heroine of the stories, Lorelei Lee, was a bold, ambitious flapper, who was much more concerned with collecting expensive baubles from her conquests than any marriage licenses, in addition to being a shrewd woman of loose morals and high self-esteem.
Writers in the United States such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Anita Loos and illustrators such as Russell Patterson, John Held, Jr., Ethel Hays and Faith Burrows popularized the flapper look and lifestyle through their works, and flappers came to be seen as attractive, reckless, and independent.

Mount Shasta, California

Mount ShastaMount Shasta CityMt. Shasta
Anita Loos was born Corinne Anita Loos in Sisson, California (today Mount Shasta), to Richard Beers Loos and Minnie Ellen Smith.
Anita Loos - writer and author of the screenplay Gentlemen Prefer Blondes was born in Sisson (now Mount Shasta) in 1888.

Red-Headed Woman

The first project Thalberg handed Loos was Jean Harlow's Red-Headed Woman because F. Scott Fitzgerald was having no luck adapting Katherine Brush's book.
Red-Headed Woman is a 1932 American pre-Code romantic comedy film, produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, based on a novel of the same name by Katharine Brush, and with a screenplay by Anita Loos.

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (musical)

Gentlemen Prefer BlondesBye Bye Baby1949 musical
Two Broadway producers had their eye on a musical version of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and brought in Joseph Fields as co-author.
Gentlemen Prefer Blondes is a musical with a book by Joseph Fields and Anita Loos, lyrics by Leo Robin, and music by Jule Styne, based on the best-selling novel of the same name by Loos.

San Diego High School

San DiegoSan Diego (CA)San Diego High
After graduating from San Diego High, Loos devised a method of cobbling together published reports of Manhattan social life, mailing them to a friend in New York who would submit them under their own name for publication in San Diego.
Anita Loos, Screenwriter, playwright, and author

Aldous Huxley

HuxleyAldousAldous Huxley’s
Loos garnered fan letters from fellow authors William Faulkner, Aldous Huxley and Edith Wharton, among others.
During this period, Huxley earned a substantial income as a Hollywood screenwriter; Christopher Isherwood, in his autobiography My Guru and His Disciple, states that Huxley earned more than $3,000 per week (an enormous sum in those days) as a screenwriter, and that he used much of it to transport Jewish and left-wing writer and artist refugees from Hitler's Germany to the US. In March 1938, Huxley's friend Anita Loos, a novelist and screenwriter, put him in touch with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM), which hired him for Madame Curie which was originally to star Greta Garbo and be directed by George Cukor.

Lucy Stone League

Loos was among the first to join Ruth Hale's Lucy Stone League, an organization that fought for women to preserve their maiden names after marriage.
Anita Loos, playwright-author

H. L. Mencken

H.L. MenckenMencken, H. L.Mencken
Loos had become a devoted admirer of H. L. Mencken, a literary critic and intellect.
In his capacity as editor, Mencken became close friends with the leading literary figures of his time, including Theodore Dreiser, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Joseph Hergesheimer, Anita Loos, Ben Hecht, Sinclair Lewis, James Branch Cabell, and Alfred Knopf, as well as a mentor to several young reporters, including Alistair Cooke.

Lillian Lorraine

Dorothy Shaw was modeled after herself and Constance Talmadge and Lorelei most closely resembled acquisitive Ziegfeld showgirl, Lillian Lorraine, who was always looking for new places to display the diamonds bestowed by her suitors.
Her personality and private life reportedly was a large influence on Anita Loos in the creation of the character of Lorelei for the novel Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.

Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend

Sparkling DiamondsDiamonds Are a Girl's Best Friends
At the memorial service, friends Helen Hayes, Ruth Gordon, and Lillian Gish, regaled the mourners with humorous anecdotes and Jule Styne played songs from Loos' musicals, including "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend".
It was based on a novel by Anita Loos.

Helen Hayes

Helen Brown
At the memorial service, friends Helen Hayes, Ruth Gordon, and Lillian Gish, regaled the mourners with humorous anecdotes and Jule Styne played songs from Loos' musicals, including "Diamonds Are a Girl's Best Friend". In the fall of 1946, Loos returned to New York to work on Happy Birthday, a Saroyanesque cocktail party comedy written for Helen Hayes.
Hayes, who spoke with her good friend Anita Loos almost daily on the phone, told her, "I used to think New York was the most enthralling place in the world. I'll bet it still is and if I were free next summer, I would prove it."