Annapolis Royal

Annapolis Royal, Nova ScotiaAnnapolis, Nova ScotiaAnnapolisTown of AnnapolisTownship of AnnapolisPort-RoyalPort RoyalRaid on Annapolis RoyalAnnapolis Royal, NSPort Royal Administration
Annapolis Royal, formerly known as Port Royal, is a town located in the western part of Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, Canada.wikipedia
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Halifax, Nova Scotia

HalifaxHalifax Regional MunicipalityHalifax, NS
The town was the capital of Acadia and later Nova Scotia for almost 150 years, until the founding of the City of Halifax in 1749.
The establishment of the Town of Halifax, named after the 2nd Earl of Halifax, in 1749 led to the colonial capital being transferred from Annapolis Royal.

Siege of Port Royal (1710)

Conquest of AcadiaSiege of Port Royalcapture
It was attacked by the British six times before permanently changing hands after the Siege of Port Royal in 1710.
After the French surrender, the British occupied the fort in the capital with all the pomp and ceremony of having captured one of the great fortresses of Europe, and renamed it Annapolis Royal.

Bay of Fundy

FundybayFundy Bay
The Bay of Fundy is just over the North Mountain, 10 kilometres north of the town.
The Annapolis Royal Generating Station, a 20 MW tidal power station on the Annapolis River upstream of Annapolis Royal, is one of the few tidal generating stations in the world, and the only one in North America.

Port-Royal (Acadia)

Port RoyalPort-RoyalBattle of Port Royal
It was also called Port Royal and it developed into the capital of the French colony of Acadia.
Port-Royal was a settlement on the site of modern-day Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, part of the French colony of Acadia.

Port-Royal National Historic Site

Port RoyalHabitation at Port-RoyalPort-Royal
Today's Annapolis Royal is the second French settlement known by the same name and should not be confused with the 1605 French settlement of Port-Royal National Historic Site also known as the Habitation. The original French year-round settlement at present-day Port Royal, known as the Habitation at Port-Royal, was established in 1605 by François Gravé Du Pont, Samuel de Champlain, with and for Pierre Dugua, Sieur de Mons.
France relocated the settlement and capital 8 km upstream and to the south bank of the Annapolis River (see Port-Royal (Acadia)); the site of the present-day town of Annapolis Royal.

Annapolis Basin

Goat Island
The town is on south bank of the Annapolis River facing the heavily tidal Annapolis Basin.
The basin takes its name from the Annapolis River, which drains into its eastern end at the town of Annapolis Royal.

Fort Anne

Fort Anne National Historic SiteAnnapolis RoyalFort Anne National Park
The British renamed the town Annapolis Royal and Fort Anne after Queen Anne (1665–1714), the reigning monarch.
Fort Anne is a four-star fort built to protect the harbour of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia.

National Historic Sites of Canada

National Historic Site of CanadaNational Historic SiteHistoric Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
As the site of several pivotal events during the early years of the colonisation of Canada, the historic core of Annapolis Royal was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1994.
Fort Anne in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia was also designated in 1917.

Annapolis County, Nova Scotia

Annapolis CountyAnnapolisCounty of Annapolis
Annapolis Royal, formerly known as Port Royal, is a town located in the western part of Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, Canada.
The county seat is Annapolis Royal.

Annapolis River

AnnapolisCanadian river
The town is on south bank of the Annapolis River facing the heavily tidal Annapolis Basin.
An Acadian settlement at the mouth of Allains Creek, ten kilometres upriver from Port Royal, was renamed Annapolis Royal, in honour of the reigning monarch, Queen Anne.

Battle of Bloody Creek (1711)

Battle of Bloody CreekFirst Battle of Bloody Creek1711
After success in the local Battle of Bloody Creek (1711), 600 Acadians and native warriors attempted to retake the Acadian capital.
The battle was part of an orchestrated attempt by the leaders of New France to weaken the British hold on Annapolis Royal.

Acadia

Acadiel'AcadieHistory of Acadia
The town was the capital of Acadia and later Nova Scotia for almost 150 years, until the founding of the City of Halifax in 1749. It was also called Port Royal and it developed into the capital of the French colony of Acadia.
Under potential siege by the Confederacy, in May 1722, Lieutenant Governor John Doucett took 22 Mi'kmaq hostage at Annapolis Royal to prevent the capital from being attacked.

Port Royal, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia

Port RoyalPort Royal, Nova ScotiaPort-Royal
The original French year-round settlement at present-day Port Royal, known as the Habitation at Port-Royal, was established in 1605 by François Gravé Du Pont, Samuel de Champlain, with and for Pierre Dugua, Sieur de Mons.
It is situated on the north bank of the Annapolis Basin approximately 8 km downstream from the discharge point of the Annapolis River and the town of Annapolis Royal.

John Doucett

Doucett
Under potential siege, in May 1722, Lieutenant Governor John Doucett took 22 Mi'kmaq hostage at Annapolis Royal to prevent the capital from being attacked.
He was appointed lieutenant-governor of Annapolis Royal in May, 1717 and arrived in Nova Scotia in October.

Duc d'Anville expedition

a major expeditionDuc d’Anville ExpeditionA French expedition
They never received the assistance they required from the Duc d'Anville Expedition and were forced to retreat.
This effort was the fourth and final French attempt to regain the Nova Scotian capital, Annapolis Royal, during King George's War.

Charles Deschamps de Boishébert et de Raffetot

Charles Deschamps de BoishébertBoishébertBoishebert
The Maliseet took them to one of Charles Deschamps de Boishébert et de Raffetot's refugee camps for the fleeing Acadians, which was at Beaubears Island.
From October until 3 November 1746, Boishebert took part in the unsuccessful Siege of Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia (N.S.), the British administrative and military headquarters in Acadia.

William Alexander (the younger)

William AlexanderWilliam Alexander the younger
In 1629 Scottish settlers, under the auspices of Sir William Alexander, established their settlement, known as Charlesfort, at the mouth of the Annapolis River (present site of Annapolis Royal).
1602 – 18 May 1638) was the founder, in 1629, of the Scottish colony at Port-Royal, now the site of modern Annapolis Royal.

Rose Fortune

Another notable Black Loyalist was Rose Fortune who founded a freight business and policed the Annapolis Royal waterfront.
Rose came to Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, with the Black Loyalists, where she became a successful businesswoman and the first female police officer in Canada.

Raid on Annapolis Royal (1781)

attacked the undefended town
The next year, on 29 August 1781, two large American privateer schooners attacked the undefended town.
The raid involved two American privateers attacking and pillaging Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia to revenge the British destruction of the Penobscot Expedition.

Annapolis Valley

ValleyAnnapolis Valley, Nova ScotiaVallée d'Annapolis
Annapolis Royal is situated in a good but shallow harbour at the western end of the fertile Annapolis Valley, nestled between the North and South mountains which define the valley.

King George's War

King Georges WarWarin the American colonies
During King George's War there were four attempts by the French, Acadians and Mi'kmaq to retake the capital of Acadia.
Concerned about their overland supply lines to Quebec, they raided the British fishing port of Canso on May 23, and then organized an attack on Annapolis Royal, the capital of Nova Scotia.

Dummer's War

Father Rale's War1724against Canada
During Father Rale's War, in July 1722 the Abenaki and Mi'kmaq attempted to create a blockade of Annapolis Royal, with the intent of starving the capital.
In response to the New England attack on Father Rale at Norridgewock in March 1722, 165 Mi'kmaq and Maliseet fighters gathered at Minas (Grand Pre, Nova Scotia) to lay siege to Annapolis Royal.

Windsor and Annapolis Railway

W&AWindsor & Annapolis Railway
The town had a minor boom in 1869 when the Windsor and Annapolis Railway arrived, with two large railway piers built along the waterfront and several factories constructed in the area.
The railway ran from Windsor to Annapolis Royal and leased connections to Nova Scotia's capital of Halifax.

Dominion Atlantic Railway

DAR
However, the completion of the railway to Digby in 1893, followed by the creation of the Dominion Atlantic Railway to Yarmouth, shifted most of the steamship commerce to those cities as steel-hulled vessels began to require deeper and deeper waters.
The W&A owned the track between its namesake port towns of Windsor and Annapolis Royal, and had also negotiated trackage rights to operate over the Intercolonial Railway's former Nova Scotia Railway "Windsor Branch" between Windsor Junction and Windsor, as well as on the IRC mainline from Windsor Junction into Halifax.

84th Regiment of Foot (Royal Highland Emigrants)

Royal Highland Emigrants84th Regiment of Foot84th Regiment
During the American Revolution, the 84th Regiment of Foot (Royal Highland Emigrants) were stationed at Annapolis Royal to guard Nova Scotia against American Privateers.
There were constant attacks by American privateers, such as the Sack of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia (1782), numerous raids on Liverpool, Nova Scotia (October 1776, March 1777, September, 1777, May 1778, September 1780) and a raid on Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia (1781).