Joseph Scaliger's De emendatione temporum (1583) began the modern science of chronology
A Jewish gravestone using the Year After Creation (Anno Mundi) chronology, found just outside the Rotunda of Thessaloniki
Inscription in Ballybough Cemetery, Ireland, indicating Anno Mundi 5618 (AD 1857)
The inscription over the Bevis Marks Synagogue, City of London, gives a year in Anno Mundi (5461) and Anno Domini (1701).

Anno Mundi (from Latin "in the year of the world"; לבריאת העולם), abbreviated as AM or A.M., or Year After Creation, is a calendar era based on the biblical accounts of the creation of the world and subsequent history.

- Anno Mundi

A.M. (or AM) – for the Latin Anno Mundi, meaning "in the year of the world", has its epoch in the year 3761 BC. This was first used to number the years of the modern Hebrew calendar in 1178 by Maimonides. Precursors with epochs one or two years later were used since the 3rd century, all based on the Seder Olam Rabba of the 2nd century. The year beginning in the northern autumn of 2000 was 5761 AM.

- Calendar era
Joseph Scaliger's De emendatione temporum (1583) began the modern science of chronology

3 related topics

Alpha

Anno Domini inscription at Klagenfurt Cathedral, Austria

Anno Domini

The terms anno Domini (AD) and before Christ (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars.

The terms anno Domini (AD) and before Christ (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars.

Anno Domini inscription at Klagenfurt Cathedral, Austria
Statue of Charlemagne by Agostino Cornacchini (1725), at St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City. Charlemagne promoted the usage of the Anno Domini epoch throughout the Carolingian Empire.

This calendar era is based on the traditionally reckoned year of the conception or birth of Jesus, AD counting years from the start of this epoch and BC denoting years before the start of the era.

"However, nowhere in his exposition of his table does Dionysius relate his epoch to any other dating system, whether consulate, Olympiad, year of the world, or regnal year of Augustus; much less does he explain or justify the underlying date."

The Tusculum portrait of Julius Caesar

Julian calendar

Reform of the Roman calendar.

Reform of the Roman calendar.

The Tusculum portrait of Julius Caesar
This is a visual example of the official date change from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian.
Russian icon of the Theophany (the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist) (6 January), the highest-ranked feast which occurs on the fixed cycle of the Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar.

In 537, Justinian required that henceforth the date must include the name of the emperor and his regnal year, in addition to the indiction and the consul, while also allowing the use of local eras.

In the eastern Mediterranean, the efforts of Christian chronographers such as Annianus of Alexandria to date the Biblical creation of the world led to the introduction of Anno Mundi eras based on this event.

Joseph Scaliger's De emendatione temporum (1583) began the modern science of chronology

Epoch

Joseph Scaliger's De emendatione temporum (1583) began the modern science of chronology

In chronology and periodization, an epoch or reference epoch is an instant in time chosen as the origin of a particular calendar era.

Anno Mundi (years since the creation of the world) is used in the Byzantine calendar (5509 BC).