Modern artistic depiction of Solomon's Temple, at the Israel Museum
A Jewish gravestone using the Year After Creation (Anno Mundi) chronology, found just outside the Rotunda of Thessaloniki
Modern-day reconstruction of Jerusalem during the reign of Solomon (10th century BCE). The temple stands on the original Mount Moriah, as it looked prior to its expansion by King Herod in the 1st century BCE
Inscription in Ballybough Cemetery, Ireland, indicating Anno Mundi 5618 (AD 1857)
King Solomon dedicates the Temple at Jerusalem. Painting by James Tissot or follower, c. 1896–1902
The inscription over the Bevis Marks Synagogue, City of London, gives a year in Anno Mundi (5461) and Anno Domini (1701).
Chaldees destroy the Brazen Sea, Painting by James Tissot, c. 1900
Proposed reconstruction of Solomon's Temple (2013) based on 10th century BCE shrine model discovered in Khirbet Qeiyafa
Plan of Solomon's Temple, published 1905
Plan of Solomon's Temple with measurements
Molten Sea, illustration in the Holman Bible, 1890
Asherah was worshipped until King Josiah
Digital rendering of Solomon's Temple (2010)
Model of the First Temple, included in a Bible manual for teachers (1922)
Depiction of Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem by the 16th-century French scholar François Vatable

There are also discrepancies between methods of dating based on the text of the Bible vs. modern academic dating of landmark events used to calibrate year counts, such as the destruction of the First Temple—see Missing years (Jewish calendar).

- Anno Mundi

Rabbinic sources state that the First Temple stood for 410 years and, based on the 2nd-century work Seder Olam Rabbah, place construction in 832 BCE and destruction in 422 BCE (3338 AM), 165 years later than secular estimates.

- Solomon's Temple
Modern artistic depiction of Solomon's Temple, at the Israel Museum

2 related topics

Alpha

Jewish calendar, showing Adar II between 1927 and 1948

Missing years (Jewish calendar)

Jewish calendar, showing Adar II between 1927 and 1948

The missing years in the Hebrew calendar refer to a chronological discrepancy between the rabbinic dating for the destruction of the First Temple in 423 BCE (3338 Anno Mundi) and the academic dating of it in 587 BCE.

The Jewish calendar's reference point is traditionally considered to be about one year before the creation of the world.

Seder Olam Rabbah

2nd-century CE Hebrew language chronology detailing the dates of biblical events from creation to Alexander the Great's conquest of Persia.

2nd-century CE Hebrew language chronology detailing the dates of biblical events from creation to Alexander the Great's conquest of Persia.

The Jewish calendar's reference point is traditionally considered to be about one year before the creation of the world.

The dating system of numbering the years from creation was adopted sometime before 3925 Anno Mundi (165 CE), and based on the calculation of Rabbi Yose ben Halafta during about 160 CE in the book Seder Olam Rabbah.

For example, the Jewish year for the destruction of the First Temple has traditionally been given as 3338 AM or 421/2 BC. This differs from the modern scientific year, which is usually expressed using the Proleptic Julian calendar as 587 BC. The scientific date takes into account evidence from the ancient Babylonian calendar and its astronomical observations.