Antenna (radio)

antennaantennasradio antennahorizontal polarizationaerialvertical polarizationantennaehorizontalverticalaerials
In radio engineering, an antenna is the interface between radio waves propagating through space and electric currents moving in metal conductors, used with a transmitter or receiver.wikipedia
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Transmitter

radio transmittertransmittersradio transmitters
In radio engineering, an antenna is the interface between radio waves propagating through space and electric currents moving in metal conductors, used with a transmitter or receiver. It is a fundamental property of antennas that the electrical characteristics of an antenna described in the next section, such as gain, radiation pattern, impedance, bandwidth, resonant frequency and polarization, are the same whether the antenna is transmitting or receiving.
In electronics and telecommunications a transmitter or radio transmitter is an electronic device which produces radio waves with an antenna.

Radio

radio communicationradio communicationswireless
Antennas are essential components of all radio equipment.
They are generated by an electronic device called a transmitter connected to an antenna which radiates the waves, and received by a radio receiver connected to another antenna.

Parabolic antenna

dish antennaparabolicparabolic dish antenna
An antenna may include components not connected to the transmitter, parabolic reflectors, horns, or parasitic elements, which serve to direct the radio waves into a beam or other desired radiation pattern.
A parabolic antenna is an antenna that uses a parabolic reflector, a curved surface with the cross-sectional shape of a parabola, to direct the radio waves.

Directional antenna

high-gain antennadirectionalhigh gain antenna
Antennas can be designed to transmit and receive radio waves in all horizontal directions equally (omnidirectional antennas), or preferentially in a particular direction (directional, or high-gain, or “beam” antennas).
A directional antenna or beam antenna is an antenna which radiates or receives greater power in specific directions allowing increased performance and reduced interference from unwanted sources.

Horn antenna

hornhornsCorrugated Horn
An antenna may include components not connected to the transmitter, parabolic reflectors, horns, or parasitic elements, which serve to direct the radio waves into a beam or other desired radiation pattern.
A horn antenna or microwave horn is an antenna that consists of a flaring metal waveguide shaped like a horn to direct radio waves in a beam.

Radio wave

radio wavesradioradio signal
In radio engineering, an antenna is the interface between radio waves propagating through space and electric currents moving in metal conductors, used with a transmitter or receiver.
Radio waves are generated artificially by transmitters and received by radio receivers, using antennas.

Omnidirectional antenna

non-directional antennaomnidirectionalnon-directional
Antennas can be designed to transmit and receive radio waves in all horizontal directions equally (omnidirectional antennas), or preferentially in a particular direction (directional, or high-gain, or “beam” antennas).
In radio communication, an omnidirectional antenna is a class of antenna which radiates equal radio power in all directions perpendicular to an axis (azimuthal directions), with power varying with angle to the axis (elevation angle), declining to zero on the axis.

Radiation pattern

antenna patternbeam patternFar-field pattern
An antenna may include components not connected to the transmitter, parabolic reflectors, horns, or parasitic elements, which serve to direct the radio waves into a beam or other desired radiation pattern. It is a fundamental property of antennas that the electrical characteristics of an antenna described in the next section, such as gain, radiation pattern, impedance, bandwidth, resonant frequency and polarization, are the same whether the antenna is transmitting or receiving.
In the field of antenna design the term radiation pattern (or antenna pattern or far-field pattern) refers to the directional (angular) dependence of the strength of the radio waves from the antenna or other source.

Passive radiator

parasitic elementparasiticparasitic radiator
An antenna may include components not connected to the transmitter, parabolic reflectors, horns, or parasitic elements, which serve to direct the radio waves into a beam or other desired radiation pattern.
In a radio antenna, a passive radiator or parasitic element is a conductive element, typically a metal rod, which is not electrically connected to anything else.

Dipole antenna

dipoledipoleshalf wave dipole
Hertz placed dipole antennas at the focal point of parabolic reflectors for both transmitting and receiving.
In radio and telecommunications a dipole antenna or doublet is the simplest and most widely used class of antenna.

Whip antenna

ground plane antennaWhipwhip-style
A vertical antenna or whip antenna radiates in all directions horizontally, but sends less energy upward or downward.
A whip antenna is an antenna consisting of a straight flexible wire or rod.

Phased array

phased array radarphased-arrayphased-array radar
A phased array consists of two or more simple antennas which are connected together through an electrical network.
In antenna theory, a phased array usually means an electronically scanned array, a computer-controlled array of antennas which creates a beam of radio waves that can be electronically steered to point in different directions without moving the antennas.

Monopole antenna

monopolemonopolesquarter-wave monopole
The vertical antenna is a monopole antenna, not balanced with respect to ground.
A monopole antenna is a class of radio antenna consisting of a straight rod-shaped conductor, often mounted perpendicularly over some type of conductive surface, called a ground plane.

Beverage antenna

Beverage
For reception, a long Beverage antenna can have significant directivity.
The Beverage antenna or "wave antenna" is a long-wire receiving antenna mainly used in the low frequency and medium frequency radio bands, invented by Harold H. Beverage in 1921.

Log-periodic antenna

log periodic antennalog-periodicLog-periodic dipole array
A log-periodic dipole array consists of a number of dipole elements of different lengths in order to obtain a somewhat directional antenna having an extremely wide bandwidth.
A log-periodic antenna (LP), also known as a log-periodic array or log-periodic aerial, is a multi-element, directional antenna designed to operate over a wide band of frequencies.

Feed line

feedlinefeeder linefeeding line
An antenna lead-in is the transmission line, or feed line, which connects the antenna to a transmitter or receiver.
In a radio antenna, the feed line (feedline), or feeder, is the cable or other transmission line that connects the antenna with the radio transmitter or receiver.

Transmission line

transmission linestransmissiontransmission-line
An antenna lead-in is the transmission line, or feed line, which connects the antenna to a transmitter or receiver.
Transmission lines are used for purposes such as connecting radio transmitters and receivers with their antennas (they are then called feed lines or feeders), distributing cable television signals, trunklines routing calls between telephone switching centres, computer network connections and high speed computer data buses.

Antenna feed

feed antennafeedfeed antennas
The “antenna feed” may refer to all components connecting the antenna to the transmitter or receiver, such as an impedance matching network in addition to the transmission line.

Antenna tuner

Pi networktunertuners
An antenna coupling network is a passive network (generally a combination of inductive and capacitive circuit elements) used for impedance matching in between the antenna and the transmitter or receiver.
Antenna tuner, matching network, matchbox, transmatch, antenna tuning unit (ATU), antenna coupler, and feedline coupler are all equivalent names for a device connected between a radio transmitter and its antenna, to improve power transfer between them by matching the specified load impedance of the radio to the combined input impedance of the feedline and the antenna.

Coaxial cable

coaxialcoax cablecable
Such a structure is normally connected to the return connection of an unbalanced transmission line such as the shield of a coaxial cable.
It is used in such applications as telephone trunklines, broadband internet networking cables, high speed computer data busses, carrying cable television signals, and connecting radio transmitters and receivers to their antennas.

Broadcast engineering

radio engineeringbroadcast engineerradio engineer
In radio engineering, an antenna is the interface between radio waves propagating through space and electric currents moving in metal conductors, used with a transmitter or receiver.
New equipment from the transmitter to the radio antenna to the receiver may be encountered by engineers new to the field.

Ground plane

ground plane antennareference planereflector screen
An antenna counterpoise, or ground plane, is a structure of conductive material which improves or substitutes for the ground.
In antenna theory, a ground plane is a conducting surface large in comparison to the wavelength, such as the Earth, which is connected to the transmitter's ground wire and serves as a reflecting surface for radio waves.

Radio receiver

receiverreceiversRadios
In radio engineering, an antenna is the interface between radio waves propagating through space and electric currents moving in metal conductors, used with a transmitter or receiver. It is a fundamental property of antennas that the electrical characteristics of an antenna described in the next section, such as gain, radiation pattern, impedance, bandwidth, resonant frequency and polarization, are the same whether the antenna is transmitting or receiving.
It is used with an antenna.

Antenna gain

gaindirective gaingain of an antenna
It is a fundamental property of antennas that the electrical characteristics of an antenna described in the next section, such as gain, radiation pattern, impedance, bandwidth, resonant frequency and polarization, are the same whether the antenna is transmitting or receiving.
In electromagnetics, an antenna's power gain or simply gain is a key performance number which combines the antenna's directivity and electrical efficiency.

Counterpoise (ground system)

counterpoisecounterpoise wirescounterpoises
An antenna counterpoise, or ground plane, is a structure of conductive material which improves or substitutes for the ground.
In electronics and radio communication a counterpoise is a network of suspended horizontal wires or cables (or a metal screen), used as a substitute for an earth (ground) connection in a radio antenna system.