A report on Antenna (radio) and Antenna array

A stack of "fishbone" and Yagi–Uda television antennas
A common type of array antenna, a reflective array UHF television antenna. This example consists of eight dipole driven elements mounted in front of a wire screen reflector. The X-shaped dipoles give it a wide bandwidth to cover both the VHF (174–216 MHz) and UHF (470–700 MHz) TV bands. It has a gain of 5 dB VHF and 12 dB UHF and an 18 dB front-to-back ratio.
Animation of a half-wave dipole antenna radiating radio waves, showing the electric field lines. The antenna in the center is two vertical metal rods connected to a radio transmitter (not shown). The transmitter applies an alternating electric current to the rods, which charges them alternately positive (+) and negative (−). Loops of electric field leave the antenna and travel away at the speed of light; these are the radio waves. In this animation the action is shown slowed down enormously.
Large planar array antenna of a VHF Russian mobile air defense radar, the Nebo-M. It consists of 175 folded dipole antennas. An early phased array, the antenna radiated a vertical fan-shaped beam which could be swept horizontally across the airspace in front of the antenna.
Electronic symbol for an antenna
Animation showing how a phased array works.
Antennas of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array.
A rooftop television antenna, an endfire parasitic array consisting of a combination of a Yagi and log periodic antenna
An automobile's whip antenna, a common example of an omnidirectional antenna.
VHF collinear array of folded dipoles
Half-wave dipole antenna
Sector antennas (white bars) on cell phone tower. Collinear dipole arrays, radiating a flat, fan-shaped beam.
Diagram of the electric fields ( blue ) and magnetic fields ( red ) radiated by a dipole antenna ( black rods) during transmission.
108 MHz reflective array antenna of an SCR-270 radar used during World War II consists of 32 half-wave dipole antennas in front of a reflecting screen.
Cell phone base station antennas
US Air Force PAVE PAWS phased array 420 - 450 MHz radar antenna for ballistic missile detection, Alaska. The two circular arrays are each composed of 2677 crossed dipole antennas.
Standing waves on a half wave dipole driven at its resonant frequency. The waves are shown graphically by bars of color ( red for voltage, V and blue for current, I ) whose width is proportional to the amplitude of the quantity at that point on the antenna.
Some of the crossed-dipole elements in the PAVE PAWS phased array antenna, left
Typical center-loaded mobile CB antenna with loading coil
Batwing VHF television broadcasting antenna
Polar plots of the horizontal cross sections of a (virtual) Yagi-Uda-antenna. Outline connects points with 3 dB field power compared to an ISO emitter.
Crossed-dipole FM radio broadcast antenna
The wave reflected by earth can be considered as emitted by the image antenna.
Curtain array shortwave transmitting antenna, Austria. Wire dipoles suspended between towers
The currents in an antenna appear as an image in opposite phase when reflected at grazing angles. This causes a phase reversal for waves emitted by a horizontally polarized antenna (center) but not for a vertically polarized antenna (left).
Turnstile antenna array used for satellite communication
frame
Flat microstrip array antenna for satellite TV reception.
The Very Large Array, a radio telescope made of a Y-shaped array of 27 dish antennas in Socorro, New Mexico
HAARP, a phased array of 180 crossed dipoles in Alaska which can transmit a 3.6 MW beam of 3 - 10 MHz radio waves into the ionosphere for research purposes
Array of four helical antennas used as a satellite tracking antenna, Pleumeur-Bodou, France

An antenna array (or array antenna) is a set of multiple connected antennas which work together as a single antenna, to transmit or receive radio waves.

- Antenna array

A number of such dipole elements can be combined into an antenna array such as the Yagi-Uda in order to favor a single horizontal direction, thus termed a beam antenna.

- Antenna (radio)
A stack of "fishbone" and Yagi–Uda television antennas

4 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Animation showing how a phased array works. It consists of an array of antenna elements (A) powered by a transmitter (TX). The feed current for each element passes through a phase shifter (φ) controlled by a computer (C). The moving red lines show the wavefronts of the radio waves emitted by each element.  The individual wavefronts are spherical, but they combine (superpose) in front of the antenna to create a plane wave, a beam of radio waves travelling in a specific direction.  The phase shifters delay the radio waves progressively going up the line so each antenna emits its wavefront later than the one below it.  This causes the resulting plane wave to be directed at an angle θ to the antenna's axis.  By changing the phase shifts the computer can instantly change the angle θ of the beam.  Most phased arrays have two-dimensional arrays of antennas instead of the linear array shown here, and the beam can be steered in two dimensions. The velocity of the radio waves shown have been slowed down in this diagram.

Phased array

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Animation showing how a phased array works. It consists of an array of antenna elements (A) powered by a transmitter (TX). The feed current for each element passes through a phase shifter (φ) controlled by a computer (C). The moving red lines show the wavefronts of the radio waves emitted by each element.  The individual wavefronts are spherical, but they combine (superpose) in front of the antenna to create a plane wave, a beam of radio waves travelling in a specific direction.  The phase shifters delay the radio waves progressively going up the line so each antenna emits its wavefront later than the one below it.  This causes the resulting plane wave to be directed at an angle θ to the antenna's axis.  By changing the phase shifts the computer can instantly change the angle θ of the beam.  Most phased arrays have two-dimensional arrays of antennas instead of the linear array shown here, and the beam can be steered in two dimensions. The velocity of the radio waves shown have been slowed down in this diagram.
Animation showing the radiation pattern of a phased array of 15 antenna elements spaced a quarter wavelength apart as the phase difference between adjacent antennas is swept between −120 and 120 degrees. The dark area is the beam or main lobe, while the light lines fanning out around it are sidelobes.
Ferdinand Braun's 1905 directional antenna which used the phased array principle, consisting of 3 monopole antennas in an equilateral triangle. A quarter-wave delay in the feedline of one antenna caused the array to radiate in a beam. The delay could be switched manually into any of the 3 feeds, rotating the antenna beam by 120°.
BMEWS & PAVE PAWS Radars
Mammut phased array radar World War II
Active Phased Array Radar mounted on top of Sachsen-class frigate F220 Hamburg's superstructure of the German Navy
AN/SPY-1A radar installation at National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma. The enclosing radome provides weather protection.
The radiation pattern of a phased array in polar coordinate system.
An antenna tower consisting of a fixed phase collinear antenna array with four elements

In antenna theory, a phased array usually means an electronically scanned array, a computer-controlled array of antennas which creates a beam of radio waves that can be electronically steered to point in different directions without moving the antennas.

A modern high-gain UHF Yagi television antenna with 17 directors, and one reflector (made of four rods) shaped as a corner reflector.

Yagi–Uda antenna

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A modern high-gain UHF Yagi television antenna with 17 directors, and one reflector (made of four rods) shaped as a corner reflector.
Drawing of Yagi–Uda VHF television antenna from 1954, used for analog channels 2–4, 54–72 MHz (USA channels). It has five elements: three directors (to left) one reflector (to right) and a driven element which is a folded dipole (double rod) to match the 300 Ω twin lead feedline. The beam direction (direction of greatest sensitivity) is to the left.
Quartet of two-dipole Yagi arrays '(Hirschgeweih) of the German FuG 220 VHF-band radar on the nose of a late-World War II Bf 110 night fighter aircraft.
Yagi–Uda antenna with a reflector (left), half-wave driven element (centre), and director (right). Exact spacings and element lengths vary somewhat according to specific designs.
A portable Yagi–Uda antenna for use at 144 MHz (2 m), with segments of yellow tape-measure ribbon for the arms of the driven and parasitic elements.
Two Yagi–Uda antennas on a single mast. The top one includes a corner reflector and three stacked Yagis fed in phase in order to increase gain in the horizontal direction (by cancelling power radiated toward the ground or sky). The lower antenna is oriented for vertical polarization, with a much lower resonant frequency.
A Nakajima J1N1-S night fighter with quadruple Yagi radar transceiver antennas
Close-up of Yagi arrays of the ASV Mark II radar fitted beneath a Bristol Beaufort aircraft for anti-submarine warfare.
How the antenna works. The radio waves from each element are emitted with a phase delay, so that the individual waves emitted in the forward direction (up) are in phase, while the waves in the reverse direction are out of phase. Therefore, the forward waves add together, (constructive interference) enhancing the power in that direction, while the backward waves partially cancel each other (destructive interference), thereby reducing the power emitted in that direction.
Illustration of forward gain of a two element Yagi–Uda array using only a driven element (left) and a director (right). The wave (green) from the driven element excites a current in the passive director which reradiates a wave (blue) having a particular phase shift (see explanation in text, note that the dimensions are not to scale with the numbers in the text). The addition of these waves (bottom) is increased in the forward direction, but leads to partial cancellation in the reverse direction.

A Yagi–Uda antenna or simply Yagi antenna, is a directional antenna consisting of two or more parallel resonant antenna elements in an end-fire array; these elements are most often metal rods acting as half-wave dipoles.

Diagram showing directivity: the highest power density of this antenna is in the direction of the red lobe

Directivity

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Diagram showing directivity: the highest power density of this antenna is in the direction of the red lobe

In electromagnetics, directivity is a parameter of an antenna or optical system which measures the degree to which the radiation emitted is concentrated in a single direction.

In an antenna array the directivity is a complicated calculation in the general case.

A shortwave loop antenna

Loop antenna

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A shortwave loop antenna
A quad antenna is a self-resonant loop in a square shape; this one also includes a parasitic element.
Car roof-mounted 6 meter halo antenna for mobile amateur radio (WA8FJW). Note the triple-loop.
Although a full 2.7 m in diameter, this receiving antenna is a "small" loop compared to LF and MF wavelengths.
Small loop antenna used for receiving, consisting of about 10 turns around a 12 x rectangle.
Amount of atmospheric noise for LF, MF, and HF spectrum according CCIR 322
The full wave loop (left) has maximum signal broadside to the wires with nulls off the sides, the small loop (right) has maximum signal in the plane of its wires with nulls broadside to the wires. (Pink and red represent "hot" or intense radiation; blue and indigo represent "cold" or low / no radiation.)
Loop antenna, receiver, and accessories used in amateur radio direction finding at 80 m wavelength (3.5 MHz).
Ferrite loopstick antenna from an AM radio having two windings, one for long wave and one for medium wave (AM broadcast) reception. About 10 cm long. Ferrite antennas are usually enclosed inside the radio receiver.
A loop antenna for amateur radio under construction

A loop antenna is a radio antenna consisting of a loop or coil of wire, tubing, or other electrical conductor, that is usually fed by a balanced source or feeding a balanced load.

There may be one or more additional loops stacked parallel to the first as parasitic elements or driven elements, creating an antenna array which is unidirectional with increased gain.