A report on Antenna (radio) and Phased array

A stack of "fishbone" and Yagi–Uda television antennas
Animation showing how a phased array works. It consists of an array of antenna elements (A) powered by a transmitter (TX). The feed current for each element passes through a phase shifter (φ) controlled by a computer (C). The moving red lines show the wavefronts of the radio waves emitted by each element.  The individual wavefronts are spherical, but they combine (superpose) in front of the antenna to create a plane wave, a beam of radio waves travelling in a specific direction.  The phase shifters delay the radio waves progressively going up the line so each antenna emits its wavefront later than the one below it.  This causes the resulting plane wave to be directed at an angle θ to the antenna's axis.  By changing the phase shifts the computer can instantly change the angle θ of the beam.  Most phased arrays have two-dimensional arrays of antennas instead of the linear array shown here, and the beam can be steered in two dimensions. The velocity of the radio waves shown have been slowed down in this diagram.
Animation of a half-wave dipole antenna radiating radio waves, showing the electric field lines. The antenna in the center is two vertical metal rods connected to a radio transmitter (not shown). The transmitter applies an alternating electric current to the rods, which charges them alternately positive (+) and negative (−). Loops of electric field leave the antenna and travel away at the speed of light; these are the radio waves. In this animation the action is shown slowed down enormously.
Animation showing the radiation pattern of a phased array of 15 antenna elements spaced a quarter wavelength apart as the phase difference between adjacent antennas is swept between −120 and 120 degrees. The dark area is the beam or main lobe, while the light lines fanning out around it are sidelobes.
Electronic symbol for an antenna
Ferdinand Braun's 1905 directional antenna which used the phased array principle, consisting of 3 monopole antennas in an equilateral triangle. A quarter-wave delay in the feedline of one antenna caused the array to radiate in a beam. The delay could be switched manually into any of the 3 feeds, rotating the antenna beam by 120°.
Antennas of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array.
BMEWS & PAVE PAWS Radars
An automobile's whip antenna, a common example of an omnidirectional antenna.
Mammut phased array radar World War II
Half-wave dipole antenna
Active Phased Array Radar mounted on top of Sachsen-class frigate F220 Hamburg's superstructure of the German Navy
Diagram of the electric fields ( blue ) and magnetic fields ( red ) radiated by a dipole antenna ( black rods) during transmission.
AN/SPY-1A radar installation at National Severe Storms Laboratory, Norman, Oklahoma. The enclosing radome provides weather protection.
Cell phone base station antennas
The radiation pattern of a phased array in polar coordinate system.
Standing waves on a half wave dipole driven at its resonant frequency. The waves are shown graphically by bars of color ( red for voltage, V and blue for current, I ) whose width is proportional to the amplitude of the quantity at that point on the antenna.
An antenna tower consisting of a fixed phase collinear antenna array with four elements
Typical center-loaded mobile CB antenna with loading coil
Polar plots of the horizontal cross sections of a (virtual) Yagi-Uda-antenna. Outline connects points with 3 dB field power compared to an ISO emitter.
The wave reflected by earth can be considered as emitted by the image antenna.
The currents in an antenna appear as an image in opposite phase when reflected at grazing angles. This causes a phase reversal for waves emitted by a horizontally polarized antenna (center) but not for a vertically polarized antenna (left).
frame

In antenna theory, a phased array usually means an electronically scanned array, a computer-controlled array of antennas which creates a beam of radio waves that can be electronically steered to point in different directions without moving the antennas.

- Phased array

A phased array consists of two or more simple antennas which are connected together through an electrical network.

- Antenna (radio)
A stack of "fishbone" and Yagi–Uda television antennas

5 related topics with Alpha

Overall

A telecommunications tower with a variety of dish antennas for microwave relay links on Frazier Peak, Ventura County, California. The apertures of the dishes are covered by plastic sheets (radomes) to keep out moisture.

Microwave

2 links

Form of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths ranging from about one meter to one millimeter corresponding to frequencies between 300 MHz and 300 GHz respectively.

Form of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths ranging from about one meter to one millimeter corresponding to frequencies between 300 MHz and 300 GHz respectively.

A telecommunications tower with a variety of dish antennas for microwave relay links on Frazier Peak, Ventura County, California. The apertures of the dishes are covered by plastic sheets (radomes) to keep out moisture.
The atmospheric attenuation of microwaves and far infrared radiation in dry air with a precipitable water vapor level of 0.001 mm. The downward spikes in the graph correspond to frequencies at which microwaves are absorbed more strongly. This graph includes a range of frequencies from 0 to 1 THz; the microwaves are the subset in the range between 0.3 and 300 gigahertz.
Waveguide is used to carry microwaves. Example of waveguides and a diplexer in an air traffic control radar
Disassembled radar speed gun. The grey assembly attached to the end of the copper-colored horn antenna is the Gunn diode which generates the microwaves.
A satellite dish on a residence, which receives satellite television over a Ku band 12–14 GHz microwave beam from a direct broadcast communications satellite in a geostationary orbit 35,700 kilometres (22,000 miles) above the Earth
The parabolic antenna (lower curved surface) of an ASR-9 airport surveillance radar which radiates a narrow vertical fan-shaped beam of 2.7–2.9 GHz (S band) microwaves to locate aircraft in the airspace surrounding an airport.
Small microwave oven on a kitchen counter
Microwaves are widely used for heating in industrial processes. A microwave tunnel oven for softening plastic rods prior to extrusion.
Absorption wavemeter for measuring in the Ku band.
1.2 GHz microwave spark transmitter (left) and coherer receiver (right) used by Guglielmo Marconi during his 1895 experiments had a range of 6.5 km
ku band microstrip circuit used in satellite television dish.
Heinrich Hertz's 450 MHz spark transmitter, 1888, consisting of 23 cm dipole and spark gap at focus of parabolic reflector
Jagadish Chandra Bose in 1894 was the first person to produce millimeter waves; his spark oscillator (in box, right) generated 60 GHz (5 mm) waves using 3 mm metal ball resonators.
Microwave spectroscopy experiment by John Ambrose Fleming in 1897 showing refraction of 1.4 GHz microwaves by paraffin prism, duplicating earlier experiments by Bose and Righi.
Augusto Righi's 12 GHz spark oscillator and receiver, 1895
Antennas of 1931 experimental 1.7 GHz microwave relay link across the English Channel.
Experimental 700 MHz transmitter 1932 at Westinghouse labs transmits voice over a mile.
Southworth (at left) demonstrating waveguide at IRE meeting in 1938, showing 1.5 GHz microwaves passing through the 7.5 m flexible metal hose registering on a diode detector.
The first modern horn antenna in 1938 with inventor Wilmer L. Barrow
thumb|Randall and Boot's prototype cavity magnetron tube at the University of Birmingham, 1940. In use the tube was installed between the poles of an electromagnet
First commercial klystron tube, by General Electric, 1940, sectioned to show internal construction
British Mk. VIII, the first microwave air intercept radar, in nose of British fighter. Microwave radar, powered by the new magnetron tube, significantly shortened World War II.
Mobile US Army microwave relay station 1945 demonstrating relay systems using frequencies from 100 MHz to 4.9 GHz which could transmit up to 8 phone calls on a beam.

Their short wavelength also allows narrow beams of microwaves to be produced by conveniently small high gain antennas from a half meter to 5 meters in diameter.

Another directive antenna practical at microwave frequencies is the phased array, a computer-controlled array of antennas that produces a beam that can be electronically steered in different directions.

A variety of radio antennas on Sandia Peak near Albuquerque, New Mexico, US

Radio

1 links

Technology of signaling and communicating using radio waves.

Technology of signaling and communicating using radio waves.

A variety of radio antennas on Sandia Peak near Albuquerque, New Mexico, US
Radio communication. Information such as sound is converted by a transducer such as a microphone to an electrical signal, which modulates a radio wave produced by the transmitter. A receiver intercepts the radio wave and extracts the information-bearing modulation signal, which is converted back to a human usable form with another transducer such as a loudspeaker.
Comparison of AM and FM modulated radio waves
Frequency spectrum of a typical modulated AM or FM radio signal. It consists of a component C at the carrier wave frequency f_c with the information (modulation) contained in two narrow bands of frequencies called sidebands (SB) just above and below the carrier frequency.
Satellite television dish on a residence
Satellite phones, showing the large antennas needed to communicate with the satellite
Firefighter using walkie-talkie
VHF marine radio on a ship
Parabolic antennas of microwave relay links on tower in Australia
RFID tag from a DVD
Satellite Communications Center Dubna in Russia
Communications satellite belonging to Azerbaijan
Military air traffic controller on US Navy aircraft carrier monitors aircraft on radar screen
ASR-8 airport surveillance radar antenna. It rotates once every 4.8 seconds. The rectangular antenna on top is the secondary radar.
Rotating marine radar antenna on a ship
A personal navigation assistant GPS receiver in a car, which can give driving directions to a destination.
EPIRB emergency locator beacon on a ship
Wildlife officer tracking radio-tagged mountain lion
US Air Force MQ-1 Predator drone flown remotely by a pilot on the ground
Remote keyless entry fob for a car
Quadcopter, a popular remote-controlled toy
Television receiver

They are generated by an electronic device called a transmitter connected to an antenna which radiates the waves, and received by another antenna connected to a radio receiver.

Phased-array radar – a radar set that uses a phased array, a computer-controlled antenna that can steer the radar beam quickly to point in different directions without moving the antenna. Phased-array radars were developed by the military to track fast-moving missiles and aircraft. They are widely used in military equipment and are now spreading to civilian applications.

Experimental radar antenna, US Naval Research Laboratory, Anacostia, D. C., from the late 1930s (photo taken in 1945).

Radar

1 links

Detection system that uses radio waves to determine the distance (ranging), angle, and radial velocity of objects relative to the site.

Detection system that uses radio waves to determine the distance (ranging), angle, and radial velocity of objects relative to the site.

Experimental radar antenna, US Naval Research Laboratory, Anacostia, D. C., from the late 1930s (photo taken in 1945).
The first workable unit built by Robert Watson-Watt and his team
A Chain Home tower in Great Baddow, Essex, United Kingdom
Memorial plaque commemorating Robert Watson-Watt and Arnold Wilkins
Commercial marine radar antenna. The rotating antenna radiates a vertical fan-shaped beam.
3D Doppler Radar Spectrum showing a Barker Code of 13
Brightness can indicate reflectivity as in this 1960 weather radar image (of Hurricane Abby). The radar's frequency, pulse form, polarization, signal processing, and antenna determine what it can observe.
Change of wavelength caused by motion of the source.
Radar multipath echoes from a target cause ghosts to appear.
Pulse radar: The round-trip time for the radar pulse to get to the target and return is measured. The distance is proportional to this time.
Continuous wave (CW) radar. Using frequency modulation allows range to be extracted.
Pulse-Doppler signal processing. The Range Sample axis represents individual samples taken in between each transmit pulse. The Range Interval axis represents each successive transmit pulse interval during which samples are taken. The Fast Fourier Transform process converts time-domain samples into frequency domain spectra. This is sometimes called the bed of nails.
Radar components
AS-3263/SPS-49(V) antenna (US Navy)
Surveillance radar antenna
Slotted waveguide antenna
Phased array: Not all radar antennas must rotate to scan the sky.

A radar system consists of a transmitter producing electromagnetic waves in the radio or microwaves domain, a transmitting antenna, a receiving antenna (often the same antenna is used for transmitting and receiving) and a receiver and processor to determine properties of the objects.

Another method of steering is used in a phased array radar.

A common type of array antenna, a reflective array UHF television antenna. This example consists of eight dipole driven elements mounted in front of a wire screen reflector. The X-shaped dipoles give it a wide bandwidth to cover both the VHF (174–216 MHz) and UHF (470–700 MHz) TV bands. It has a gain of 5 dB VHF and 12 dB UHF and an 18 dB front-to-back ratio.

Antenna array

0 links

A common type of array antenna, a reflective array UHF television antenna. This example consists of eight dipole driven elements mounted in front of a wire screen reflector. The X-shaped dipoles give it a wide bandwidth to cover both the VHF (174–216 MHz) and UHF (470–700 MHz) TV bands. It has a gain of 5 dB VHF and 12 dB UHF and an 18 dB front-to-back ratio.
Large planar array antenna of a VHF Russian mobile air defense radar, the Nebo-M. It consists of 175 folded dipole antennas. An early phased array, the antenna radiated a vertical fan-shaped beam which could be swept horizontally across the airspace in front of the antenna.
Animation showing how a phased array works.
A rooftop television antenna, an endfire parasitic array consisting of a combination of a Yagi and log periodic antenna
VHF collinear array of folded dipoles
Sector antennas (white bars) on cell phone tower. Collinear dipole arrays, radiating a flat, fan-shaped beam.
108 MHz reflective array antenna of an SCR-270 radar used during World War II consists of 32 half-wave dipole antennas in front of a reflecting screen.
US Air Force PAVE PAWS phased array 420 - 450 MHz radar antenna for ballistic missile detection, Alaska. The two circular arrays are each composed of 2677 crossed dipole antennas.
Some of the crossed-dipole elements in the PAVE PAWS phased array antenna, left
Batwing VHF television broadcasting antenna
Crossed-dipole FM radio broadcast antenna
Curtain array shortwave transmitting antenna, Austria. Wire dipoles suspended between towers
Turnstile antenna array used for satellite communication
Flat microstrip array antenna for satellite TV reception.
The Very Large Array, a radio telescope made of a Y-shaped array of 27 dish antennas in Socorro, New Mexico
HAARP, a phased array of 180 crossed dipoles in Alaska which can transmit a 3.6 MW beam of 3 - 10 MHz radio waves into the ionosphere for research purposes
Array of four helical antennas used as a satellite tracking antenna, Pleumeur-Bodou, France

An antenna array (or array antenna) is a set of multiple connected antennas which work together as a single antenna, to transmit or receive radio waves.

Some antenna arrays (such as military phased array radars) are composed of thousands of individual antennas.

Patch antenna gain pattern

Directional antenna

0 links

Patch antenna gain pattern
An early example (1922) of a directional AM radio transmitter, built for WOR, then in New Jersey and targeting both New York City and Philadelphia.
Karl Jansky and his rotating directional radio antenna (1932) in Holmdel, New Jersey, which was the world's first radio telescope, discovering radio emissions from the Milky Way.
Grote Reber's homemade antenna in Wheaton, Illinois (1937), world's second radio telescope and first parabolic radio telescope
Holmdel Horn Antenna in Holmdel, New Jersey (1960s). Built to support the Echo satellite communication program,<ref>{{cite journal |author=Crawford, A.B., D.C. Hogg and L.E. Hunt |title=Project Echo: A Horn-Reflector Antenna for Space Communication |journal=The Bell System Technical Journal |date=July 1961 |pages=1095–1099}}</ref> it was later used in experiments that revealed the cosmic background radiation permeating the universe.<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/butowsky5/astro4k.htm |title=National Park Service: Astronomy and Astrophysics (Horn Antenna) |access-date=2008-05-23 |date=2001-11-05 |url-status=dead |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20080512093810/http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/butowsky5/astro4k.htm |archive-date=2008-05-12 }}</ref>
Parabolic antenna – the 70 m antenna at Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex in the Mojave Desert, California
Voyager 2 spacecraft. The HGA (a parabolic antenna) is the large bowl-shaped object.
A giant phased-array radar in Alaska
A Yagi-Uda antenna. From left to right, the elements mounted on the boom are called the reflector, driven element, and director. The reflector is easily identified as being a bit (5%) longer than the driven element, and the director a bit (5%) shorter.

A directional antenna or beam antenna is an antenna which radiates or receives greater power in specific directions allowing increased performance and reduced interference from unwanted sources.

There are many ways to make a high-gain antenna; the most common are parabolic antennas, helical antennas, yagi antennas, and phased arrays of smaller antennas of any kind.