Hippocampus (brain)

In neurology, anterograde amnesia is a loss of the ability to create new memories after the event that caused amnesia, leading to a partial or complete inability to recall the recent past, while long-term memories from before the event remain intact.

- Anterograde amnesia

One form of evidence cited in favor of the existence of a short-term store comes from anterograde amnesia, the inability to learn new facts and episodes.

- Short-term memory
Hippocampus (brain)

3 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Amnesie

Amnesia

1 links

Deficit in memory caused by brain damage or disease, but it can also be caused temporarily by the use of various sedatives and hypnotic drugs.

Deficit in memory caused by brain damage or disease, but it can also be caused temporarily by the use of various sedatives and hypnotic drugs.

Amnesie

There are two main types of amnesia: retrograde amnesia and anterograde amnesia.

Anterograde amnesia is the inability to transfer new information from the short-term store into the long-term store.

Long-term memory

1 links

Stage of the Atkinson–Shiffrin memory model in which informative knowledge is held indefinitely.

Stage of the Atkinson–Shiffrin memory model in which informative knowledge is held indefinitely.

It is defined in contrast to short-term and working memory, which persist for only about 18 to 30 seconds.

His subsequent total anterograde amnesia and partial retrograde amnesia provided the first evidence for the localization of memory function, and further clarified the differences between declarative and procedural memory.

Molaison in 1953 before his surgery

Henry Molaison

0 links

American who had a bilateral medial temporal lobectomy to surgically resect the anterior two thirds of his hippocampi, parahippocampal cortices, entorhinal cortices, piriform cortices, and amygdalae in an attempt to cure his epilepsy.

American who had a bilateral medial temporal lobectomy to surgically resect the anterior two thirds of his hippocampi, parahippocampal cortices, entorhinal cortices, piriform cortices, and amygdalae in an attempt to cure his epilepsy.

Molaison in 1953 before his surgery
Most of Molaison's two hippocampi were removed bilaterally.

After the surgery, which was partially successful in controlling his seizures, Molaison developed severe anterograde amnesia: although his working memory and procedural memory were intact, he could not commit new events to his explicit memory.

In particular, his apparent ability to complete tasks that require recall from short-term memory and procedural memory but not long-term episodic memory suggests that recall from these memory systems may be mediated, at least in part, by different areas of the brain.