A report on Choir and Anthem

Evensong rehearsal in the quire of York Minster, showing carved choirstalls
Egyptian Alexandria Jewish choir of Rabbin Moshe Cohen at Samuel Menashe synagogue, Alexandria, Egypt
The boychoir Cantores Minores in the Helsinki Cathedral in 2013
Lambrook School choir in the 1960s, a typical boys' school choir of the time
One possible layout
Choir in front of the orchestra
Relief, now in Athens, showing Dionysus with actresses (possibly from The Bacchae) carrying masks and drums
Church singing, Tacuinum Sanitatis Casanatensis (14th century)
Luca della Robbia's Cantoria, Museo dell'Opera del Duomo, Florence
Baroque cantata with one voice per part

Originally, and in music theory and religious contexts, it also refers more particularly to short sacred choral work (still frequently seen in Sacred Harp and other types of shape note singing) and still more particularly to a specific form of liturgical music.

- Anthem

Chief among these are the Anglican and Roman Catholic churches; far more common however is the performance of anthems or motets at designated times in the service.

- Choir
Evensong rehearsal in the quire of York Minster, showing carved choirstalls

3 related topics with Alpha

Overall

The first page from the manuscript of J. S. Bach's Baroque music era motet, entitled Der Geist hilft unser Schwachheit auf (BWV226)

Motet

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Mainly a vocal musical composition, of highly diverse form and style, from high medieval music to the present.

Mainly a vocal musical composition, of highly diverse form and style, from high medieval music to the present.

The first page from the manuscript of J. S. Bach's Baroque music era motet, entitled Der Geist hilft unser Schwachheit auf (BWV226)

In the latter part of the 16th century, Giovanni Gabrieli and other composers developed a new style, the polychoral motet, in which two or more choirs of singers (or instruments) alternated.

In English similar compositions are called anthems.

17th-century copy of a lost original portrait by an unknown artist.
Orlando Gibbons' Signature (vect).svg

Orlando Gibbons

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English composer and keyboard player who was one of the last masters of the English Virginalist School and English Madrigal School.

English composer and keyboard player who was one of the last masters of the English Virginalist School and English Madrigal School.

17th-century copy of a lost original portrait by an unknown artist.
Orlando Gibbons' Signature (vect).svg
James Sargant Storer's drawing of, Orlando Gibbons's baptism place, St Martin's Church, Oxford, dated sometime before its renovations in 1820
16th-century Cambridge (Map by Braun and Hogenberg)
Employer of Orlando Gibbons, James I, who raised the annual salary of Gentleman of the Chapel Royal from £30 to £40 in 1604
Portrait of Charles, employer of Gibbons, as Prince of Wales after Daniel Mytens, c. 1623
Gibbons' memorial in Canterbury Cathedral designed by Nicholas Stone.

Orlando was born into a musical family: not only was his father a musician, but his oldest brother, Edward, was a composer and master of the Choir of King's College, Cambridge.

Earlier that year King James I had ascended to the throne; in all likelihood Gibbons took part in the hymns and anthems of the 25 July coronation.

Arvid Liljelund's Man Singing Hymn (1884)

Hymn

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Type of song, usually religious and partially coincident with devotional song, specifically written for the purpose of adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a deity or deities, or to a prominent figure or personification.

Type of song, usually religious and partially coincident with devotional song, specifically written for the purpose of adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a deity or deities, or to a prominent figure or personification.

Arvid Liljelund's Man Singing Hymn (1884)
In Christianity, church congregations often sing hymns together as part of their worship (Pictured: worshippers at Uffington Parish Church in England, 1944)
Hymns are often accompanied by organ music
Sanskrit manuscript page from the "Vivaha sukta" Rigveda, dated 1500-1200 BCE

Shape notes were important in the spread of (then) more modern singing styles, with tenor-led 4-part harmony (based on older English West Gallery music), fuging sections, anthems and other more complex features.

By the 1860s musical reformers like Lowell Mason (the so-called "better music boys") were actively campaigning for the introduction of more "refined" and modern singing styles, and eventually these American tune books were replaced in many churches, starting in the Northeast and urban areas, and spreading out into the countryside as people adopted the gentler, more soothing tones of Victorian hymnody, and even adopted dedicated, trained choirs to do their church's singing, rather than having the entire congregation participate.