Anthemius

Procopius Anthemius
Anthemius (Latin: Procopius Anthemius Augustus; c. 420 – 11 July 472) was Western Roman Emperor from 467 to 472.wikipedia
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Ricimer

Flavius Ricimer
Anthemius was killed by Ricimer, his own general of Gothic descent, who contested power with him. Therefore, both empires had no emperor, and the power was in the hands of the Western generals, Ricimer and Majorian, and of the Eastern Magister militum, the Alan Aspar.
Flavius Ricimer (Classical ; c. 405 – August 18, 472) was a Romanized Germanic general who effectively ruled the remaining territory of the Western Roman Empire from 461 until his death in 472, with a brief interlude in which he contested power with Anthemius.

Procopius (Romans)

ProcopiusProcopii
Anthemius belonged to a noble family, the Procopii, which gave several high officers, both civil and military, to the Eastern Roman Empire.
Procopius was the name of various Romans who lived during the fourth and fifth centuries, most of whom were connected with the emperor Anthemius.

Procopius (magister militum)

Procopius
His father was Procopius, magister militum per Orientem from 422 to 424, who was descended from the Procopius who had been a cousin of Emperor Julian I and a usurper against the Emperor Valens (365–366).
420s AD) was a general and politician in the Eastern Roman Empire; he was the father of the Western Roman Emperor Anthemius.

Marcia Euphemia

Aelia Marcia Euphemia
In 453 he married Marcia Euphemia, daughter of the Eastern Emperor Marcian (450–457); after the marriage he was elevated to the rank of comes and sent to the Danubian frontier with the task of rebuilding the border defences, neglected after Attila's death in 453.
Marcia Euphemia (also known as Aelia Marcia Euphemia) was the wife of Anthemius, Western Roman Emperor.

Procopius (usurper)

Procopius
His father was Procopius, magister militum per Orientem from 422 to 424, who was descended from the Procopius who had been a cousin of Emperor Julian I and a usurper against the Emperor Valens (365–366).
His first wife was probably Artemisia, having married secondly the dowager Empress Faustina, while the Roman general of the 5th century Procopius and his son, the Emperor Anthemius, were among his descendants, the first being the son of his son Procopius.

Marcellinus (magister militum)

Marcellinus
Born in Constantinople around 420, he went to Alexandria to study in the school of the Neoplatonic philosopher Proclus; among his fellow students there were Marcellinus (magister militum and governor of Illyricum), Flavius Illustrius Pusaeus (Praetorian prefect of the East and Consul in 467), Messius Phoebus Severus (Consul in 470 and praefectus urbi), and Pamprepius (pagan poet).
He appears to have remained ruler of Dalmatia down to 468 and to have preserved his independence except for briefly accepting the authority of the Emperors Majorian and Anthemius.

Western Roman Empire

Western EmpireWesternWest
Perhaps the last capable Western Roman Emperor, Anthemius attempted to solve the two primary military challenges facing the remains of the Western Roman Empire: the resurgent Visigoths, under Euric, whose domain straddled the Pyrenees; and the unvanquished Vandals, under Geiseric, in undisputed control of North Africa.
Severus died in 465 and Leo I, with the consent of Ricimer, appointed the capable Eastern general Anthemius as Western Emperor following an eighteen-month interregnum.

Marcian

Flavius MarcianByzantine emperor of that nameEmperor Marcianus
In 453 he married Marcia Euphemia, daughter of the Eastern Emperor Marcian (450–457); after the marriage he was elevated to the rank of comes and sent to the Danubian frontier with the task of rebuilding the border defences, neglected after Attila's death in 453.
Marcian had his daughter Marcia Euphemia, who came from a previous marriage, marry Anthemius, future Western Roman Emperor, in 453.

Pamprepius

Born in Constantinople around 420, he went to Alexandria to study in the school of the Neoplatonic philosopher Proclus; among his fellow students there were Marcellinus (magister militum and governor of Illyricum), Flavius Illustrius Pusaeus (Praetorian prefect of the East and Consul in 467), Messius Phoebus Severus (Consul in 470 and praefectus urbi), and Pamprepius (pagan poet).
At the same time he studied philosophy under the neo-Platonic philosopher Proclus, who had, among his students, the Roman general Marcellinus, the Western Roman Emperor Anthemius, and the consuls Illustrius Pusaeus and Messius Phoebus Severus.

Marcian (usurper)

MarcianFlavius Marcianus
The following year the two consuls were Anthemius' son, Marcian, and Leo's son-in-law, Flavius Zeno (later successor of Leo on the Eastern throne).
His father was Procopius Anthemius, Western Roman Emperor between 467 and 472, who descended from Procopius, usurper in 365-366 against Emperor Valens and relative of Emperor Julian's (360-363).

Messius Phoebus Severus

Flavius Messius Phoebus Severus
Born in Constantinople around 420, he went to Alexandria to study in the school of the Neoplatonic philosopher Proclus; among his fellow students there were Marcellinus (magister militum and governor of Illyricum), Flavius Illustrius Pusaeus (Praetorian prefect of the East and Consul in 467), Messius Phoebus Severus (Consul in 470 and praefectus urbi), and Pamprepius (pagan poet). In 470 the consuls were Messius Phoebus Severus, Anthemius' old friend and fellow student at Proclus' school, and the Magister militum per Orientem Flavius Iordanes. Among the new patricii there were Italian senators, e.g. Romanus and Messius Phoebus Severus, but against common practice he also appointed Gallic senators and even aristocrats without noteworthy careers, such as Magnus Felix and the Gallic poet Sidonius Apollinaris.
Born in Rome, he studied at the school of the neoplatonist philosopher Proclus, in Alexandria; among the other students there were the Pagan poet Pamprepius (who was instrumental in the revolt of Illus), the military officer Marcellinus (later semi-autonomous commander in Illyricum), the noble Anthemius (Consul and Western Roman Emperor), and Illustrius Pusaeus (Praetorian prefect of the East in 465 and Consul in 467).

Illustrius Pusaeus

Flavius Pusaeus
Born in Constantinople around 420, he went to Alexandria to study in the school of the Neoplatonic philosopher Proclus; among his fellow students there were Marcellinus (magister militum and governor of Illyricum), Flavius Illustrius Pusaeus (Praetorian prefect of the East and Consul in 467), Messius Phoebus Severus (Consul in 470 and praefectus urbi), and Pamprepius (pagan poet).
Other noteworthy figures belonged to the same pagan circle and studied with Pusaeus, such as Pamprepius (poet and supporter of Illus' usurpation), Marcellinus (later semi-independent military commander of Illyricum), Anthemius (Consul and Western Emperor), and Messius Phoebus Severus (Consul and praefectus urbi).

Alypia (daughter of Anthemius)

Alypia
Anthemius' matrimonial policy also included the marriage of his only daughter, Alypia, and the powerful Magister militum Ricimer.
467–472 AD) was a noblewoman of the Western Roman Empire, daughter of the Western Roman Emperor Anthemius.

Aspar

Flavius AsparArdabur AsparFlavius Ardabur Aspar
Therefore, both empires had no emperor, and the power was in the hands of the Western generals, Ricimer and Majorian, and of the Eastern Magister militum, the Alan Aspar.
Despite the presence of a strong candidate to the purple, the magister militum and Marcian's son-in-law Anthemius, the choice was quite different.

Anthemius (praetorian prefect)

AnthemiusFlavius Anthemius
His mother Lucina, born c. 400, descended from Flavius Philippus, Praetorian prefect of the East in 346, and was the daughter of the influential Flavius Anthemius, Praetorian prefect of the East (404–415) and Consul in 405.
His fate is unknown, but through his daughter's marriage to magister militum Procopius, he became grandfather to the later Western Emperor Anthemius.

Anthemiolus

He collected an army under the nominal leadership of his own son, Anthemiolus, but actually commanded by the generals Torisarius, Everdingus, and Hermianus.
Anthemiolus (died c. 471 AD) was the son of the Western Roman Emperor Anthemius (467–472) and Marcia Euphemia, daughter of the Eastern Roman emperor Marcian.

Zeno (emperor)

ZenoEmperor ZenoFlavius Zeno
The following year the two consuls were Anthemius' son, Marcian, and Leo's son-in-law, Flavius Zeno (later successor of Leo on the Eastern throne).
Marcian was the son of the Western Roman Emperor Anthemius (467–472) and a grandson of Emperor Marcian (450–457).

Olybrius

Anicius OlybriusFlavius Anicius Olybrius
Gaiseric had his own candidate, Olybrius, who was related to Gaiseric because both Olybrius and a son of Gaiseric's had married the two daughters of Emperor Valentinian III.
Gaiseric was again his major supporter, but the Eastern Emperor Leo I the Thracian chose the noble Procopius Anthemius.

Ecdicius

Ecdicius Avitus
Even though Arelate and Marseilles in Southern Gaul were still governed by the Western court, Avernia was isolated from the rest of the Empire and governed by Ecdicius, son of Emperor Avitus, while the territory later included in the so-called Domain of Soissons was located further north.
In the 460s he was one of the richest and most important persons in the western Empire and he was present at the court of Anthemius until 469.

Flavius Iordanes

Flavius Jordanes
In 470 the consuls were Messius Phoebus Severus, Anthemius' old friend and fellow student at Proclus' school, and the Magister militum per Orientem Flavius Iordanes.
He was holding the office of magister militum per Orientem when the Western Emperor Anthemius appointed him consul with Messius Phoebus Severus for 470.

Sidonius Apollinaris

SidoniusGaius Sollius Modestus Apollinaris SidoniusGaius Sollius Apollinaris Sidonius
The poet Sidonius Apollinaris arrived in Rome on the occasion of the wedding at the end of 467 and described the celebrations in which all social classes were involved; he also hints that Alypia might have not liked her husband, a barbarian. Among the new patricii there were Italian senators, e.g. Romanus and Messius Phoebus Severus, but against common practice he also appointed Gallic senators and even aristocrats without noteworthy careers, such as Magnus Felix and the Gallic poet Sidonius Apollinaris.
In 467 or 468 the emperor Anthemius rewarded him for the panegyric which he had written in honour of him by raising him to the post of Urban Prefect of Rome until 469, and afterwards to the dignity of Patrician and Senator.

Battle of Cape Bon (468)

Battle of Cape BonBattle of Cap BonCape Bon
The fleet was defeated in the Battle of Cape Bon, however, with Marcellinus killed at Roman hands in its wake.
The plan was concerted between Eastern Emperor Leo, Western Emperor Anthemius, and General Marcellinus, who enjoyed independence in Illyricum.

Basiliscus

Flavius BasiliscusBasilicusGreat Fire of Constantinople
The commander-in-chief of the operation was Leo's brother-in-law Basiliscus (who would become Eastern emperor seven years later).
The plan was concerted between Eastern Emperor Leo, Western Emperor Anthemius, and General Marcellinus, who enjoyed independence in Illyricum.

Romanus (usurper)

Romanus
Among the new patricii there were Italian senators, e.g. Romanus and Messius Phoebus Severus, but against common practice he also appointed Gallic senators and even aristocrats without noteworthy careers, such as Magnus Felix and the Gallic poet Sidonius Apollinaris.
Romanus (died 470) was a Roman usurper in the West Roman Empire who unsuccessfully rebelled against the Emperor Anthemius in 470 before being executed at Rome.

Libius Severus

SeverusFlavius '''Libius [Severus]''' Serpentius AugustusFlavius Libius Severus Serpentius
After the death of Libius Severus in 465, the Western Empire had no Emperor.
Some coins exist issued in Severus' name yet bearing a monogram sometimes identified with Ricimer; even if these coins were actually issued in the period between the reign of Severus and of his successor, Anthemius, it is nonetheless an honour unheard of for a barbarian, who was even mentioned on the inscriptions just after the emperors («salvis dd. nn. et patricio Ricimere», ).