Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986

Anti-Drug Abuse Act
The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 was a law of the War on Drugs passed by the U.S.wikipedia
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United States federal probation and supervised release

supervised releasefederal supervised releaseProbation and supervised release under United States federal law
Among other things, they changed the system of federal supervised release from a rehabilitative system into a punitive system.
However, the system was greatly revamped by the Anti-Drug Abuse Acts of 1986 and 1988.

War on drugs

drug interdictioncounter-narcoticsdrug war
The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 was a law of the War on Drugs passed by the U.S. Congress.
Then, driven by the 1986 cocaine overdose of black basketball star Len Bias, Reagan was able to pass the Anti-Drug Abuse Act through Congress.

Fair Sentencing Act

Fair Sentencing Act of 2010Fair Sentencing Act 2010
This 100:1 disparity was reduced to 18:1, when crack was increased to 28 grams (1 ounce) by the Fair Sentencing Act of 2010.
The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 implemented the initial disparity, reflecting Congress's view that crack cocaine was a more dangerous and harmful drug than powder cocaine.

Crack cocaine

crackcrack-cocainecrack pipe
The appearance of crack cocaine, the June 19, 1986 death of Len Bias (University of Maryland basketball star), the morning after he signed with the NBA champion Boston Celtics, and the June 27, 1986 death of Don Rogers (safety) (Cleveland Browns, 1985 Defensive Rookie of the Year) -- both from cocaine use, encouraged U.S. Rep. Thomas P. (Tip) O'Neill, Jr. (D-MA), the Speaker of the House of Representatives, to mobilize the House Democratic leadership to assemble an omnibus anti-drug bill that became the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986.
The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 increased penalties for crack cocaine possession and usage.

Len Bias

Without Bias
The appearance of crack cocaine, the June 19, 1986 death of Len Bias (University of Maryland basketball star), the morning after he signed with the NBA champion Boston Celtics, and the June 27, 1986 death of Don Rogers (safety) (Cleveland Browns, 1985 Defensive Rookie of the Year) -- both from cocaine use, encouraged U.S. Rep. Thomas P. (Tip) O'Neill, Jr. (D-MA), the Speaker of the House of Representatives, to mobilize the House Democratic leadership to assemble an omnibus anti-drug bill that became the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986.
The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 was signed by President Ronald Reagan on October 27, 1986.

Money laundering

money-launderinglaunderinganti-money laundering
This title criminalized money laundering for the first time in the United States.
The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 expanded the definition of financial institution to include businesses such as car dealers and real estate closing personnel and required them to file reports on large currency transaction.

Freedom of Information Act (United States)

Freedom of Information ActFOIAFreedom of Information
The FOIA amendments were a small part of the bipartisan Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 was a law of the War on Drugs passed by the U.S. Congress.

Designer drug

designer drugsdesigner steroiddesigner
The 1986 Act also prohibited controlled substance analogs.

Mandatory sentencing

mandatory minimum sentencesmandatory minimum sentencemandatory minimum
The bill enacted new mandatory minimum sentences for drugs, including marijuana.
With the passage of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986 Congress enacted different mandatory minimum sentences for drugs, including marijuana.

Cannabis (drug)

marijuanacannabispot
The bill enacted new mandatory minimum sentences for drugs, including marijuana.

Don Rogers (safety)

Don Rogers
The appearance of crack cocaine, the June 19, 1986 death of Len Bias (University of Maryland basketball star), the morning after he signed with the NBA champion Boston Celtics, and the June 27, 1986 death of Don Rogers (safety) (Cleveland Browns, 1985 Defensive Rookie of the Year) -- both from cocaine use, encouraged U.S. Rep. Thomas P. (Tip) O'Neill, Jr. (D-MA), the Speaker of the House of Representatives, to mobilize the House Democratic leadership to assemble an omnibus anti-drug bill that became the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986.

Moral panic

moral panicspublic outcrymoral outrage
The congressional interest and intense news coverage created a moral panic surrounding cocaine use, which had earlier been viewed in a more benign or even positive way.

Cocaine

cokecocaine traffickingcrack
The congressional interest and intense news coverage created a moral panic surrounding cocaine use, which had earlier been viewed in a more benign or even positive way.

Democratic Party (United States)

DemocraticDemocratDemocratic Party
A few House Democrats expressed considerable concern about the provisions of the bill.

Mike Lowry

Representative Mike Lowry (D), who voted against the bill, described the process as "legislation by political panic".

Chuck Schumer

Charles SchumerCharles E. SchumerSchumer
Representative Charles Schumer (D), who voted in favor of the bill, said "the policies are aimed at looking good rather than solving the problem."

Criminalization

criminalizecriminalisationcriminalized
This title criminalized money laundering for the first time in the United States.

Bank Secrecy Act

Bank Secrecy Act of 1970FBARanti-money laundering procedures
It also amended the Bank Secrecy Act, the Change in Bank Control Act, and the Right to Financial Privacy Act

Right to Financial Privacy Act

Right to Financial Privacy Act of 1978Right to Financial Privacy
It also amended the Bank Secrecy Act, the Change in Bank Control Act, and the Right to Financial Privacy Act

Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984

Comprehensive Crime Control Actemergency Schedule I classification
Along with the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984, the act substantially increased the number of drug offenses with mandatory minimum sentences.

Authorization bill

reauthorizeauthorizeauthorizes
The act authorized billions of dollars of spending, although substantially less was actually appropriated.

Appropriations bill (United States)

appropriationsappropriations billappropriation
The act authorized billions of dollars of spending, although substantially less was actually appropriated.

Block grant (United States)

block grantblock grantsblock
Some of this was used to increase the substance abuse treatment federal block grant program, although treatment providers were disappointed at the reduced appropriations following politicians' earlier promises and authorization.