Anti-Masonic Party

Anti-MasonicAnti-MasonAnti-MasonsAMAnti-Masonic movementAntimasonicA-MAnti- Masonicanti-Masonic persecutionsAnti-Masonry
The Anti-Masonic Party, also known as the Anti-Masonic Movement, was the first third party in the United States.wikipedia
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Whig Party (United States)

WhigWhig PartyWhigs
After emerging as a political force in the late 1820s, most of the Anti-Masonic Party's members joined the Whig Party in the 1830s and the party disappeared after 1838. In addition to Palmer and Ritner, Silas H. Jennison, an Anti-Mason, was elected Lieutenant Governor of Vermont with Whig support in 1835.
The Whigs emerged in the 1830s in opposition to President Andrew Jackson, pulling together former members of the National Republican Party, the Anti-Masonic Party, and disaffected Democrats.

William Morgan (anti-Mason)

William MorganMorgan AffairMorgan
The party was founded in the aftermath of the disappearance of William Morgan, a former Mason who had ultimately become a prominent critic of the Masonic organization.
The allegations surrounding Morgan's disappearance and presumed death sparked a public outcry and inspired Thurlow Weed and others to harness the discontent by founding the new Anti-Masonic Party in opposition to President Andrew Jackson's Democrats.

William Wirt (Attorney General)

William WirtAttorney General WirtWirt
The convention chose former attorney general William Wirt as the party's standard bearer in the 1832 presidential election and Wirt won 7.8% of the popular vote and carried Vermont. The Anti-Masonic Party conducted the first presidential nominating convention in the United States history for the 1832 elections, nominating William Wirt (a former Mason) for President and Amos Ellmaker for Vice President in Baltimore.
He was also the Anti-Masonic nominee for president in the 1832 election.

Joseph Ritner

Several Anti-Masons, including William A. Palmer and Joseph Ritner, won election to prominent positions.
Joseph Ritner (March 25, 1780 – October 16, 1869 ) was the eighth Governor of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, elected as a member of the Anti-Masonic Party.

Millard Fillmore

FillmorePresident FillmorePresident Millard Fillmore
In subsequent decades, former Anti-Masonic candidates and supporters such as Millard Fillmore, William H. Seward, Thurlow Weed and Thaddeus Stevens would become well-known members of the Whig Party.
Initially, he belonged to the Anti-Masonic Party, but became a Whig as the party formed in the mid-1830s; he was a rival for state party leadership with editor Thurlow Weed and Weed's protégé, William H. Seward.

1832 United States presidential election

18321832 presidential election1832 election
The convention chose former attorney general William Wirt as the party's standard bearer in the 1832 presidential election and Wirt won 7.8% of the popular vote and carried Vermont. The Anti-Masonic Party conducted the first presidential nominating convention in the United States history for the 1832 elections, nominating William Wirt (a former Mason) for President and Amos Ellmaker for Vice President in Baltimore.
The election saw the first use of the presidential nominating conventions, and the Democrats, National Republicans, and the Anti-Masonic Party all used national conventions to select their respective presidential candidates.

William H. Seward

William SewardWilliam Henry SewardSeward
In subsequent decades, former Anti-Masonic candidates and supporters such as Millard Fillmore, William H. Seward, Thurlow Weed and Thaddeus Stevens would become well-known members of the Whig Party.
Seward was elected to the New York State Senate in 1830 as an Anti-Mason.

1836 United States presidential election

18361836 presidential election1836 election
Harrison campaigned as a Whig in the 1836 presidential election and his relative success in the election encouraged further migration of Anti-Masons to the Whig Party.
The Whig strategy nearly succeeded in forcing the contingent election, as in 1835, a severe state-level Democratic Party split in Pennsylvania had propelled the Whig-aligned Anti-Masonic Party to statewide power.

Thurlow Weed

Weed
In subsequent decades, former Anti-Masonic candidates and supporters such as Millard Fillmore, William H. Seward, Thurlow Weed and Thaddeus Stevens would become well-known members of the Whig Party.
Weed and Seward became leaders of the New York Anti-Masonic Party, and Weed established the Albany Evening Journal.

United States presidential nominating convention

U.S. presidential nomination conventionpresidential nominating conventionpresidential nominating conventions
In 1831, the party held the first presidential nominating convention, a practice that was subsequently adopted by all major parties. The Anti-Masonic Party conducted the first presidential nominating convention in the United States history for the 1832 elections, nominating William Wirt (a former Mason) for President and Amos Ellmaker for Vice President in Baltimore.
In 1831 the Anti-Masonic Party convened in Baltimore, Maryland to select a single presidential candidate agreeable to the whole party leadership in the 1832 presidential election.

John Quincy Adams

AdamsJohn QuincyJohn Q. Adams
In New York, at this time the supporters of President John Quincy Adams, called "Adams men", or Anti-Jacksonians, or National Republicans, were a feeble organization.
He joined the Anti-Masonic Party in the early 1830s before becoming a member of the Whig Party, which united those opposed to President Jackson.

Solomon Southwick

Southwick
Though its candidate for Governor of New York, Solomon Southwick, was defeated, the Anti-Masonic Party became the main opposition party to the Jacksonian Democrats in New York.
Solomon Southwick (December 25, 1773 – November 18, 1839) was an American newspaper publisher and political figure who was a principal organizer of the Anti-Masonic Party.

Thaddeus Stevens

Thad StevensU.S. Representative Stevens
In subsequent decades, former Anti-Masonic candidates and supporters such as Millard Fillmore, William H. Seward, Thurlow Weed and Thaddeus Stevens would become well-known members of the Whig Party.
By 1829, Anti-Masonry had evolved into a political party, the Anti-Masonic Party, that proved popular in rural central Pennsylvania.

1828 United States elections

United States elections, 18281828 election1828 elections
After experiencing unexpected success in the 1828 elections, the Anti-Masons began to adopt positions on other issues, most notably support for internal improvements and a protective tariff.
Additionally, this election saw the Anti-Masonic Party win a small number of seats in the House, becoming the first third party to gain representation in Congress.

National Republican Party

Anti-JacksonianNational RepublicanNational Republicans
In New York, at this time the supporters of President John Quincy Adams, called "Adams men", or Anti-Jacksonians, or National Republicans, were a feeble organization. The Anti-Masons emerged as an important third-party alternative to Andrew Jackson's Democrats and Adams's National Republicans.
National Republicans, Anti-Masons and others joined the new party.

Batavia, New York

BataviaBatavia, NYCity of Batavia
Morgan then attempted unsuccessfully to help establish or visit lodges and chapters in Batavia, but was denied participation in Batavia's Masonic activities by members who were uncertain about Morgan's character and claims to Masonic membership.
Anti-Masonry was a factor in politics for many years afterward, leading to the creation of the Anti-Masonic Party, as well as religion.

Augustine Clarke

Palmer's brother-in-law Augustine Clarke was an Anti-Masonic presidential elector in 1832, served as Vermont state treasurer from 1833 to 1837 and was appointed to the Anti-Masonic National Committee in 1837.
Augustine Clarke (c.1780 – June 17, 1841) was a Vermont attorney, banker and politician who was a leader of the Anti-Masonic Party and served as Vermont State Treasurer.

Silas H. Jennison

Silas Hemenway Jennison
In addition to Palmer and Ritner, Silas H. Jennison, an Anti-Mason, was elected Lieutenant Governor of Vermont with Whig support in 1835.
Silas Hemenway Jennison (May 17, 1791 – September 30, 1849) was an American Anti-Masonic and Whig politician who served as Vermont's lieutenant governor and governor – the first born in the state.

Andrew Jackson

JacksonJacksonianPresident Andrew Jackson
The Anti-Masons emerged as an important third-party alternative to Andrew Jackson's Democrats and Adams's National Republicans.
The Anti-Masonic Party emerged by capitalizing on opposition to Freemasonry, which existed primarily in New England, after the disappearance and possible murder of William Morgan.

Presidency of John Quincy Adams

administrationJohn Quincy Adams6
Before and during the presidency of John Quincy Adams, there was a period of political realignment.
Adams also failed to rally strong support from the fledgling Anti-Masonic movement or from the followers of influential New York Governor DeWitt Clinton.

Martin Van Buren

Van BurenPresident Martin Van BurenPresident Van Buren
Adams supporters used the strong anti-Masonic feeling to create a new party in opposition to the rising Jacksonian Democracy nationally and the Albany Regency political organization of Martin Van Buren in New York.
Meanwhile, Clinton's death from a heart attack in 1828 dramatically shook up the politics of Van Buren's home state, while the Anti-Masonic Party emerged as an increasingly important factor.

Amos Ellmaker

Ellmaker, Amos
The Anti-Masonic Party conducted the first presidential nominating convention in the United States history for the 1832 elections, nominating William Wirt (a former Mason) for President and Amos Ellmaker for Vice President in Baltimore.
He served as the Pennsylvania Attorney General and was the Anti-Masonic vice presidential candidate in the 1832 presidential election.

Freemasonry

FreemasonFreemasonsMasonic
It strongly opposed Freemasonry as a single-issue party and later aspired to become a major party by expanding its platform to take positions on other issues.
The short-lived Anti-Masonic Party was formed, which fielded candidates for the presidential elections of 1828 and 1832.

William A. Palmer

William Adams PalmerWilliam Palmer
Several Anti-Masons, including William A. Palmer and Joseph Ritner, won election to prominent positions.
Palmer organized the first convention of Vermont's Anti-Masonic Party in Montpelier in 1829.

Vermont State Treasurer

State TreasurerTreasurerstate treasury
Palmer's brother-in-law Augustine Clarke was an Anti-Masonic presidential elector in 1832, served as Vermont state treasurer from 1833 to 1837 and was appointed to the Anti-Masonic National Committee in 1837.