Anti-Trafficking in Persons Act of 2003

Anti-Trafficking in Persons ActRA 9231
The Anti-Trafficking in Persons Act of 2003, (Republic Acts of the Philippines) R.A. No. 9208, is a consolidation of Senate Bill No. 2444 and House Bill No. 4432.wikipedia
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List of Philippine laws

Republic ActCommonwealth ActAct
The Anti-Trafficking in Persons Act of 2003, (Republic Acts of the Philippines) R.A. No. 9208, is a consolidation of Senate Bill No. 2444 and House Bill No. 4432. It was enacted and passed by Congress of the Philippines' Senate of the Philippines and House of Representatives of the Philippines (12th Congress of the Philippines, 2001–2004) assembled on May 12, 2003 and signed into law (List of Philippine laws) by President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on May 26, 2003.

Prostitution in the Philippines

Philippinesprostitutionprostitutes in the Philippines
Philippines Senator Ramon Bong Revilla, Jr., on July 26, 2006, called for coordination with the Philippine National Police vis-a-vis the public, the whistle blowers and anti-prostitution Internet online petitioner initiators, to shed light and solve the alleged prostitution in the Philippines, sexual slavery or trafficking in human beings dens in Angeles City, Pampanga.
Penalties range up to life imprisonment for those involved in trafficking, which is covered by the Anti-Trafficking in Persons Act of 2003.

Congress of the Philippines

CongressPhilippine CongressPhilippine Legislature
It was enacted and passed by Congress of the Philippines' Senate of the Philippines and House of Representatives of the Philippines (12th Congress of the Philippines, 2001–2004) assembled on May 12, 2003 and signed into law (List of Philippine laws) by President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on May 26, 2003.

Senate of the Philippines

SenateSenatorSenator of the Philippines
It was enacted and passed by Congress of the Philippines' Senate of the Philippines and House of Representatives of the Philippines (12th Congress of the Philippines, 2001–2004) assembled on May 12, 2003 and signed into law (List of Philippine laws) by President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on May 26, 2003.

House of Representatives of the Philippines

DistrictHouse of RepresentativesPhilippine House of Representatives
It was enacted and passed by Congress of the Philippines' Senate of the Philippines and House of Representatives of the Philippines (12th Congress of the Philippines, 2001–2004) assembled on May 12, 2003 and signed into law (List of Philippine laws) by President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on May 26, 2003.

12th Congress of the Philippines

12th Congress12th12th Congress (2001-2004)
It was enacted and passed by Congress of the Philippines' Senate of the Philippines and House of Representatives of the Philippines (12th Congress of the Philippines, 2001–2004) assembled on May 12, 2003 and signed into law (List of Philippine laws) by President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on May 26, 2003.

Law

legallawslegal theory
It was enacted and passed by Congress of the Philippines' Senate of the Philippines and House of Representatives of the Philippines (12th Congress of the Philippines, 2001–2004) assembled on May 12, 2003 and signed into law (List of Philippine laws) by President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on May 26, 2003.

Gloria Macapagal Arroyo

Gloria Macapagal-ArroyoArroyoPresident Arroyo
It was enacted and passed by Congress of the Philippines' Senate of the Philippines and House of Representatives of the Philippines (12th Congress of the Philippines, 2001–2004) assembled on May 12, 2003 and signed into law (List of Philippine laws) by President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on May 26, 2003.

Woman

womenwomanhoodfemale
It institutes policies to eliminate and punish human trafficking, especially women and children, establishing the necessary institutional mechanisms for the protection and support of trafficked persons.

Asia

AsianAsian continentAsian countries
R.A. 9208 made the Philippines one of the few Asian countries in Asia that have enacted an anti-trafficking legislation.

Raul M. Gonzalez

Raul GonzalezRaul GonzalesRaúl Gonzalez
The law establishes an Inter-Agency Council Against Trafficking (IACAT), first chaired by Raul M. Gonzalez, and composed of government agencies, non-government organizations and other civic organizations for the effective formulation of a comprehensive and integrated program to prevent and suppress the trafficking in persons.

Slavery

slaveslavesslave labor
The elimination of slavery throughout the world was campaigned by early abolitionists, but it was not the objective of the earliest organised British movements. Human trafficking as it relates to involuntary servitude and slavery is prohibited by the 13th Amendment.

Abolitionism

abolitionistabolition of slaveryabolitionists
The elimination of slavery throughout the world was campaigned by early abolitionists, but it was not the objective of the earliest organised British movements.

Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade

Society for the Abolition of the Slave Tradeanti-slavery campaignerAbolition Society
The Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade, which established the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade in Britain in 1787, campaigned for an end to the Transatlantic slave trade from Western Africa to the New World, which Britain dominated.

Atlantic slave trade

slave tradetransatlantic slave tradeAfrican slaves
The Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade, which established the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade in Britain in 1787, campaigned for an end to the Transatlantic slave trade from Western Africa to the New World, which Britain dominated.

West Africa

Westwestern AfricaWestern
The Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade, which established the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade in Britain in 1787, campaigned for an end to the Transatlantic slave trade from Western Africa to the New World, which Britain dominated.

New World

NewThe New WorldAmericas
The Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade, which established the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade in Britain in 1787, campaigned for an end to the Transatlantic slave trade from Western Africa to the New World, which Britain dominated.

Anti-Slavery Society

British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Societyanti-slaveryanti-slavery movement
Much later, the Anti-Slavery Society became the everyday name of 2 different British organizations.

United Kingdom

British🇬🇧UK
Much later, the Anti-Slavery Society became the everyday name of 2 different British organizations.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
In America, the United States federal government severely punishes human trafficking both within its borders and beyond, making it, a federal crime under Title 18 of the United States Code.

Federal government of the United States

federal governmentfederalU.S. government
In America, the United States federal government severely punishes human trafficking both within its borders and beyond, making it, a federal crime under Title 18 of the United States Code.

Federal crime in the United States

federal crimefederal offensefederal crimes
In America, the United States federal government severely punishes human trafficking both within its borders and beyond, making it, a federal crime under Title 18 of the United States Code.

Debt bondage

bonded labourbonded labordebt slavery
Section 1584 makes it a crime to force a person to work against his will, whether the compulsion is effected by use of force, threat of force, threat of legal coercion or by "a climate of fear" (an environment wherein individuals believe they may be harmed by leaving or refusing to work); Section 1581 similarly makes it illegal to force a person to work through "debt servitude."

Involuntary servitude

involuntary domestic servitudeinvoluntaryservitude
Human trafficking as it relates to involuntary servitude and slavery is prohibited by the 13th Amendment.