Anti-tank warfare

anti-tankanti-tank weaponanti-armorantitankanti-tank gunsanti-tank weaponsanti-tank rocketanti-tank gunanti-armouranti-tank artillery
Anti-tank warfare originated from the need to develop technology and tactics to destroy tanks during World War I (1914-1918).wikipedia
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Anti-tank grenade

grenadeanti-tank hand grenadeanti-tank hand grenades
The most predominant anti-tank weapons at the start of World War II in 1939 included the tank-mounted gun, anti-tank guns and anti-tank grenades used by the infantry, as well as ground-attack aircraft.
The first anti-tank grenades were improvised devices.

Bazooka

M20 Super Bazookabazookas3.5-inch bazooka
Anti-tank warfare evolved rapidly during World War II (1939-1945), leading to the inclusion of infantry-portable weapons such as the Bazooka, anti-tank combat engineering, specialized anti-tank aircraft and self-propelled anti-tank guns (tank destroyers). The first HEAT rounds were rifle grenades, but better delivery systems were soon introduced: the British PIAT was propelled in a manner similar to the spigot mortar with a blackpowder charge contained in the tailfin assembly, the US Bazooka and the German Panzerschreck used rockets, and the German Panzerfaust was a small recoilless gun.
Bazooka is the common name for a man-portable recoilless anti-tank rocket launcher weapon, widely fielded by the United States Army.

Tank destroyer

tank destroyersself-propelled anti-tank gunself-propelled
Anti-tank warfare evolved rapidly during World War II (1939-1945), leading to the inclusion of infantry-portable weapons such as the Bazooka, anti-tank combat engineering, specialized anti-tank aircraft and self-propelled anti-tank guns (tank destroyers).
A tank destroyer, tank hunter, or tank killer is a type of armoured fighting vehicle, armed with a direct-fire artillery gun or missile launcher, with limited operational capacities and designed specifically to engage enemy tanks.

Tank

tankstank commanderarmor
Anti-tank warfare originated from the need to develop technology and tactics to destroy tanks during World War I (1914-1918).
Armoured forces proved capable of tactical victory in an unprecedentedly short amount of time, yet new anti-tank weaponry showed that the tank was not invulnerable.

RPG-29

RPG-29 Vampir
Since the end of the Cold War in 1992, the only major new threats to tanks and other armored vehicles have been remotely detonated improvised explosive devices (IEDs) used in asymmetric warfare and weapon systems like the RPG-29 and FGM-148 Javelin, which can defeat reactive armor or shell armor.
The RPG-29 is a shoulder-launched, unguided, tube-style, breech-loading anti-tank rocket system with a range of 500 meters.

Ordnance QF 2-pounder

2-pounderOrdnance QF 2 pounderQF 2 pounder
The British Army accepted for service the (40 mm) Ordnance QF 2 pounder, which was developed as a tank gun. Examples of guns in this class include the German 37 mm, US 37 mm (the largest gun able to be towed by the jeep), French 25 mm and 47 mm guns, British QF 2-pounder (40 mm), Italian 47 mm and Soviet 45 mm.
The Ordnance QF 2-pounder (QF denoting "quick firing"), or simply "2 pounder gun", was a 40 mm British anti-tank and vehicle-mounted gun employed in the Second World War.

Armor-piercing shell

armor-piercingarmour-piercingAP
These technologies took three ammunition approaches: use of grenades by infantrymen, including the Geballte Ladung ("Bundled Charge") of several stick grenades bound together by pioneers; early attempts at the small-caliber anti-tank rifles like the 13 mm Mauser bolt-action; and 3.7 cm TaK Rheinmetall in starrer Räder-lafette 1916 anti-tank gun on a light carriage which could destroy a tank using large-caliber armor-piercing ammunition issued in 1917 to special commands; and the existing 77 mm field guns (such as the 7.7 cm FK 16) of the infantry division's artillery regiment were also eventually issued with special armor-piercing (AP) ammunition.
From the 1920s onwards, armor-piercing weapons were required for anti-tank missions.

Dragon's teeth (fortification)

dragon's teethtank trapsDragon’s Teeth
These included obstacles consisting of natural features such as ditches, streams and urban areas, or constructed obstacles such as anti-tank ditches, minefields, dragon's teeth, or log barriers.
The idea was to slow down and channel tanks into killing zones where they could easily be disposed of by anti-tank weapons.

Junkers Ju 87

StukaJu 87Ju 87 Stuka
The first aircraft capable of engaging tanks was the Junkers Ju 87 "Stuka" using dive bombing to place the bomb close to the target.
After the Battle of Britain the Stuka was used in the Balkans Campaign, the African and Mediterranean theatres and the early stages of the Eastern Front where it was used for general ground support, as an effective specialised anti-tank aircraft and in an anti-shipping role.

Battalion

infantry battalionRegimentbattalion commander
However, the Red Army was almost immediately taught a lesson about anti-tank warfare when a tank battalion sent to aid the Spanish Republicans in the Spanish Civil War was almost entirely destroyed in an engagement.
The support company usually contains anti-tank, machine gun, mortar, pioneer and reconnaissance platoons.

Military tactics

tacticstacticalmilitary tactic
Anti-tank warfare originated from the need to develop technology and tactics to destroy tanks during World War I (1914-1918).

Infantry tactics

infantryinfantry attackinfantry tactic
Naval crews initially used to operate the installed naval guns and machine guns were replaced with Army personnel who were more aware of the infantry tactics with which the tanks were intended to cooperate.
One example of this is how infantry would be sent ahead of tanks to search for anti-tank teams, while tanks would provide cover for the infantry.

T-34

T-34/85T-34-85T-34 tank
Of the major iconic Soviet weapons of the Second World War, two were made exclusively for anti-tank warfare, the T-34 and the Ilyushin Il-2 Shturmovik.
Its 76.2 mm (3 in) high-velocity tank gun provided a substantial increase in firepower over any of its contemporaries while its well-sloped armour was difficult to penetrate by most contemporary anti-tank weapons.

7.5 cm Pak 40

PaK 4075 mm Pak 407.5 cm PaK 40 L/46
By 1943 Wehrmacht was forced to adopt still larger calibers on the Eastern Front, the 75 mm and the famous 88 mm guns.
The 7.5 cm Pak 40 (7,5 cm Panzerabwehrkanone 40 - lit. "7.5cm armour defence cannon 40") was a German 75 millimetre anti-tank gun developed in 1939–1941 by Rheinmetall and used during the Second World War.

45 mm anti-tank gun M1937 (53-K)

45-mm anti-tank gun M1937 (53-K)45mm anti-tank gun45mm antitank guns
Examples of guns in this class include the German 37 mm, US 37 mm (the largest gun able to be towed by the jeep), French 25 mm and 47 mm guns, British QF 2-pounder (40 mm), Italian 47 mm and Soviet 45 mm.
The 45 mm anti-tank gun model 1937 (factory designation 53-K, GRAU index 52-P-243-PP-1), nicknamed the Sorokapyatka (from Russian сорокапятка, or "little forty-five"), was a light quick-firing anti-tank gun used in the first stage of the German-Soviet War.

8.8 cm Flak 18/36/37/41

88 mm gun88 mm88mm gun
By 1943 Wehrmacht was forced to adopt still larger calibers on the Eastern Front, the 75 mm and the famous 88 mm guns.
The 8.8 cm Flak 18/36/37/41 is a German 88 mm anti-aircraft and anti-tank artillery, developed in the 1930s.

Attack aircraft

ground-attack aircraftground attack aircraftattack
The most predominant anti-tank weapons at the start of World War II in 1939 included the tank-mounted gun, anti-tank guns and anti-tank grenades used by the infantry, as well as ground-attack aircraft.
Jet attack aircraft were designed and employed during the Cold War era, such as the carrier-based nuclear strike Douglas A-3 Skywarrior and North American A-5 Vigilante, while the Grumman A-6 Intruder, F-105 Thunderchief, F-111, F-117 Nighthawk, LTV A-7 Corsair II, Sukhoi Su-25, A-10 Thunderbolt, Panavia Tornado, AMX, Dassault Étendard, Super Étendard and others were designed specifically for ground-attack, strike, close support and anti-armor work, with little or no air-to-air capability.

Shell (projectile)

shellshellsartillery shell
Designers also developed new varieties of artillery munitions in the form of top-attack shells, and shells that were used to saturate areas with anti-armor bomblets.
At the beginning of the war, APHE was common in anti-tank shells of 75 mm caliber and larger due to the similarity with the much larger naval armor piercing shells already in common use.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
The most predominant anti-tank weapons at the start of World War II in 1939 included the tank-mounted gun, anti-tank guns and anti-tank grenades used by the infantry, as well as ground-attack aircraft.
Many means of destroying tanks, including indirect artillery, anti-tank guns (both towed and self-propelled), mines, short-ranged infantry antitank weapons, and other tanks were used.

PIAT

Projector, Infantry, Anti TankBritish PIATPIAT guns
The first HEAT rounds were rifle grenades, but better delivery systems were soon introduced: the British PIAT was propelled in a manner similar to the spigot mortar with a blackpowder charge contained in the tailfin assembly, the US Bazooka and the German Panzerschreck used rockets, and the German Panzerfaust was a small recoilless gun.
The Projector, Infantry, Anti Tank (PIAT) Mk I was a British man-portable anti-tank weapon developed during the Second World War.

M36 tank destroyer

M36 JacksonM3690 mm Gun Motor Carriage M36
Late in 1944, the Sherman-origin M36 appeared, equipped with a 90 mm cannon.
U.S. tanks were expected to fight any hostile tanks they encountered in their attack, but the mission of destroying massed enemy armored thrusts was assigned to a new branch, the Tank Destroyer Force.

Panzerfaust

Panzerfaust 30FaustpatronePanzerfaust 100
The first HEAT rounds were rifle grenades, but better delivery systems were soon introduced: the British PIAT was propelled in a manner similar to the spigot mortar with a blackpowder charge contained in the tailfin assembly, the US Bazooka and the German Panzerschreck used rockets, and the German Panzerfaust was a small recoilless gun.
The Panzerfaust (, "armor fist" or "tank fist", plural: Panzerfäuste) was an inexpensive, single shot, recoilless German anti-tank weapon of World War II.

Panzerschreck

88 rakh/B 54anti-tank weaponsbazooka
The first HEAT rounds were rifle grenades, but better delivery systems were soon introduced: the British PIAT was propelled in a manner similar to the spigot mortar with a blackpowder charge contained in the tailfin assembly, the US Bazooka and the German Panzerschreck used rockets, and the German Panzerfaust was a small recoilless gun.
"tank fright", "tank's fright" or "tank's bane") was the popular name for the Raketenpanzerbüchse 54 ("Rocket Anti-armor Rifle model 54" abbreviated to RPzB 54), an 88 mm reusable anti-tank rocket launcher developed by Nazi Germany in World War II.

Winter War

Soviet-Finnish WarSoviet invasion of FinlandRusso-Finnish War
The successful test of the latter was during the Battles of Khalkhin Gol although the Red Army foundered on the Mannerheim Line in 1940, largely due to the purge in the Officer Corps, claiming many of the senior proponents of the new doctrine.
The Finns had few anti-tank weapons and insufficient training in modern anti-tank tactics.

Trench warfare

trenchestrenchentrenchment
The tank had been developed to negate the German system of trenches, and allow a return to maneuver against enemy's flanks and to attack the rear with cavalry.
At the First Battle of Cambrai in 1917, improved tanks in larger numbers demonstrated the potential of tank warfare, though German improvised anti-tank tactics, including using direct fire from field artillery, also proved effective.